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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This Woman Is Remarkable
I have just read this book and all I can say is, Thank God for women like Somaly Mam. This inspiring, courageous woman is a lifeline for so many young girls, whom without her, would be lying in the gutter. I truly hope that her organisation receives the funding it really deserves and that her work can go on and become an even bigger success. Somaly, you are not only...
Published on 11 Jun. 2009 by C. Martin

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Somaly Mam is a Fraud! She was NEVER a sex trafficking victim She resigned
It is amazing how many people still don't know that Somaly Mam resigned from her foundation on May 28, 2014 because of lies she told about her life story and her fake "victims" Look up "Somaly Mam resignation" on the internet if you don't believe me. Somaly Mam is a fraud, cheat, liar, scam artist. She was NEVER a sex trafficking victim. She lived a normal...
Published 7 months ago by Amazon book reader


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Somaly Mam is a Fraud! She was NEVER a sex trafficking victim She resigned, 11 Sept. 2014
This review is from: The Road Of Lost Innocence (Paperback)
It is amazing how many people still don't know that Somaly Mam resigned from her foundation on May 28, 2014 because of lies she told about her life story and her fake "victims" Look up "Somaly Mam resignation" on the internet if you don't believe me. Somaly Mam is a fraud, cheat, liar, scam artist. She was NEVER a sex trafficking victim. She lived a normal life. Her own foundation SMF doesn't want anything to do with her and in fact "fired her" she not only lied about herself, but forced girls to lie to the cameras to scam money from donors and government officials. Somaly Mam abused the girls in her care and forced them to lie, and live in bad conditions. Somaly Mam committed human trafficking herself by forcing girls to commit fraud and holding them in centers against their will. Somaly Mam is a BAD person NOT a good person. She does not help anyone but herself. DON'T BE FOOLED !!

HIS ENTIRE BOOK IS A LIE AND IS PURE FICTION!

SOMALY MAM SEX TRAFFICKING IS A SCAM AND FRAUD.
SOMALY MAM HAS RESIGNED FROM HER ORGANISATION BECAUSE OF LIES SHE TOLD TO THE
WORLD!
On May 28, 2014 Somaly Mam was forced to resign from the Somaly Mam Foundation and was proven to be lying about being a victim of Sex Trafficking and forcing girls to lie about being victims. She was then forced to step down from one of the most successful anti-sex trafficking organizations in the world. She was committing fraud and stealing money from the public by providing them with false sex trafficking horror stories that were lies to send money to the Somaly Mam and Afesip charities. These charities then committed human trafficking themselves by forcing women and girls to stay in their (rescue) centers against their will and to lie about being forced into sex trafficking to the western media and donors.
Somaly Mam, the celebrated Cambodian anti-sex-trafficking activist who, according to a recent Newsweek expose, http://www.newsweek.com/2014/05/30/somaly-mam-holy-saint-and-sinner-sex-trafficking-251642.html
fabricated her entire life story and those of the alleged victims she advocated for. The revelations have disillusioned many of Mam’s loyal supporters and left the press looking gullible. Just as importantly, they’ve highlighted the public’s seemingly insatiable desire for heroic narratives—and the willingness of many in the media to trick the public and provide them even if they are fake.
News reports:
http://www.cnn.com/2014/05/30/world/asia/cambodia-sex-slavery-foundation-hero-resign/
http://www.newsweek.com/2014/05/30/somaly-mam-holy-saint-and-sinner-sex-trafficking-251642.html

Not only had Somaly Mam not been an orphaned trafficking victim – she grew up with both parents and graduated from high school – but she also forced, encouraged, coached and paid girls to lie as well. One of these girls was Long Pross, who, actually lost her eye to a tumor and was sent to Afesip for vocational training. The same was reportedly true of Meas Ratha, a teenager allegedly coached by Mam to say she had been trafficked when in fact she was sent to Afesip by an impoverished farming family. These two girls were never prostitutes and never forced sex trafficking victims! -Neither was Somaly Mam.

"It appears Nicholas Kristof knew, long before most, that journalists were calling Pross’s story into question. On October 15, 2012, a week and a half before the Cambodia Daily story went to press, SMF board member Brandee Barker emailed Marks with a warning. “I also spoke with Nick Kristof yesterday about my concern for the way you choose to report,” Barker wrote. “I suggested that, curiously, you seem to have it out for Somaly, other survivors of sex trafficking and the Foundation. He suggested he broker a meeting with your Editor in Chief. We're considering this advice.” Barker, a former head of global communications at Facebook, subsequently confirmed to me that she had conversations with Kristof about Marks’s story prior to publication."

"No reporter went quite as far as Kristof in elevating Mam’s profile. The crusading journalist has promoted her work in half a dozen columns and blog posts, as well as his documentary, Half the Sky. He even penned the foreword to her autobiography, The Road of Lost Innocence, in which he called her “the Harriet Tubman of Southeast Asia’s brothels.”
-Pat Joseph
The Atlantic
Kristof appeared with Somaly Mam at many fund raising events. He acted as her press, marketing and celebrity agent. It seemed like Kristof was working for Somaly Mam. Was he getting a kick-back from her? Why was he doing all this work for her? Of riding shotgun with Mam on a raid of one of those brothels—a stunt he also “live-tweeted” to his million-plus followers and filmed for inclusion in Half the Sky—Kristof wrote in his column of November 12, 2011: Against my better judgment, I found myself the other day charging into a well-armed brothel in a police raid. But I was comforted to be with one of my heroes, Somaly Mam.
Somaly dedicates her life to battling forced prostitution, for she herself was sold as a child to a Cambodian brothel. After enduring torture and rapes, Somaly escaped and reinvented herself as an anti-trafficking activist.
That last bit is an accurate capsule summary of the story Mam tells in her memoir and the one she has dutifully recounted (albeit with some discrepancies) in countless public appearances around the world, including at the White House and the UN. It’s also, as we know from Newsweek's story, largely untrue.

According to the article’s author, Simon Marks, during the years Somaly Mam was supposedly trapped in a Phnom Penh brothel she was actually attending school in her hometown of Thloc Chhroy. Her fellow villagers remember her as a happy, pig-tailed teenager. In her memoir, Mam claims she was orphaned at a young age and brought to Thloc Chhroy by a man she called “grandfather”—the man who sold her into slavery. The former commune chief remembered her arrival differently. “Somaly came here with her parents,” he said. “She is a daughter of Mam Khon and Pen Navy.” No one recalled the mysterious ‘grandfather’ figure.

Not only had Somaly Mam not been an orphaned trafficking victim – she grew up with both parents and graduated from high school – but she also forced, encouraged, coached and paid girls to lie as well. One of these girls was Long Pross, who, actually lost her eye to a tumor and was sent to Afesip for vocational training. The same was reportedly true of Meas Ratha, a teenager allegedly coached by Mam to say she had been trafficked when in fact she was sent to Afesip by an impoverished farming family. These two girls were never prostitutes and never forced sex trafficking victims.

Extreme scenarios Mam often invoked - girls put in cages, tortured with electricity, having their eyes gouged out by pimps. “We never encountered any such thing, and we certainly looked for it,” the study’s author, Thomas Steinfatt, said this week. “We couldn’t find any instances of that … In terms of people tortured, I think they’ve been watching too many movies.” Somaly Mam was never sold for sex. Nor was Long Pross. When Pross was 13, a nonmalignant tumor which covered her eye was surgically removed. There were no electrical currants. No rape. No torture. No piece of metal gouged deeply into her eye. Those were lies. Lies propagated by Somaly Mam and lies encouraged by the Western media with Nicholas Kristof who had been captivated by increasingly fake horrific tales of sexual predation.

Phnom Penh, Cambodia - In early 2011, Srey Mao, 28, and two friends were captured and taken to a shelter run by Afesip, a Cambodian organisation that prides itself on helping sex-trafficking victims.

There was just one problem: The women claim they hadn’t actually been trafficked. Instead, the women said they were willing sex workers who had been rounded up off the street during a police raid and sent to Afesip, headed by the internationally renowned anti-sex-slavery crusader Somaly Mam with funding from the foundation that bears her name. They said they were confined there against their will for months as purported victims of sex trafficking. Srey Mao claimed that she, her friends and a number of other sex workers in the centrer were instructed by a woman to tell foreign visitors they had been trafficked.“I was confined against my will by Somaly Mam,” Srey Mao said on Saturday. The person she said instructed ordered her and others to lie was Somaly Mam.

When it comes to Sex trafficking the only people the media speak with are the anti-sex trafficking organizations or zealous politicians and no one else. This is a biased one-sided conversation. The media will never question, check or research any of the claims that these groups make. Always taking their word for it and never once researching or questioning their statistics or anything they say. This results in misleading and false reporting by the media and news organizations.

Prostitutes are NOT forced! They do sex work of their own free will. The media, NGO’s and government officials will never admit this or ask the sex workers rights groups or prostitutes themselves about the sex industry.

Here are some good websites about this:
http://bebopper76.wordpress.com/
http://humantraffickingstatistics.wordpress.com/
http://www.lauraagustin.com/
http://www.policeprostitutionandpolitics.com/
http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2014/06/somaly-mam-scandal-victims-can-lie/372188/
http://www.newsweek.com/2014/05/30/somaly-mam-holy-saint-and-sinner-sex-trafficking-251642.html
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This Woman Is Remarkable, 11 Jun. 2009
By 
C. Martin - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Road Of Lost Innocence (Paperback)
I have just read this book and all I can say is, Thank God for women like Somaly Mam. This inspiring, courageous woman is a lifeline for so many young girls, whom without her, would be lying in the gutter. I truly hope that her organisation receives the funding it really deserves and that her work can go on and become an even bigger success. Somaly, you are not only beautiful on the outside, you are a strong caring human being with an even more beautiful heart. Keep fighting girl, you may not win the war but every little girl you rescue is a single battle won. Take care x
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cambodian sex slavery., 22 Dec. 2011
By 
Maha Upasika Gotami (Wales) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: The Road Of Lost Innocence (Paperback)
'When I was sold to a brothel, I was sixteen. Today, there are virgins for sale in every large town. To make sure of their virginity some of the girls are as young as five or six years old.'
They are sold, stolen, raped, beaten and often killed. This is their story told in a beautifully written style, with some photographs, by a Cambodian who escaped the system and has spent the rest of her life trying to help, save and rebuild the lives of her fellow countrywomen, and to tell the world, particularly men, what is actually going on and what it is like for the women.
She says that there are more than 50,000 sex slaves in Cambodia; 1 in 40 girls will be sold into sex slavery.
Writing the book, she says, makes her sick, gives her nightmares; she showers and cries, but 'what can one do?'

Although the subject is horrifying, there is no hint of 'Poor Me!' - the whole book is powerful, informative and inspirational.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A candid account of an uncomfortable subject to many people, 21 Jan. 2013
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This review is from: The Road Of Lost Innocence (Paperback)
This is an autobiography that would give one a heavy heart. I have had it on my shelf for a while. The subject matter is not a pleasant one - it is not for enjoyment that I want to read it but to understand a life that is beyond my experience. During the snowy days of confinement, I read this through in less than 24 hours, but I feel this is a book written with blood and hardship of one's experience, which took her a lifetime, first to live through the actual events and then live with the constant torments of the emotional and psychological scars. Must we know about the extent of wickedness that exists in the world? Yes, because I believe we share a collective responsibility of human wickedness. We may not be directly involved in the wicked acts, but we may have participated through our negligence. Does our ignorance shield us from being guilty of inaction? It is true that there are a lot of social issues around the world and we cannot possibly be well informed of every single one of them. But I feel it is our duty to choose a handful of them that are close to our hearts, learn more about them and then decide how we would like to follow up.

It is hard to believe that life for these girls could be worse than it was, but this seems to be the reality. Even though the author is open and honest about her experience, with her naked emotions, I don't think we can truly comprehend what life is like for them even after reading such a candid account. She keeps asking, with almost child-like honesty, why would human do this to other human beings, whether it was the family who sold the girls to the trade, or husbands who abused their wife, or the pimps who "punished" their girls with physical or psychological tortures, or the clients who were violent? Do we feel collectively we, the human race, owe them an answer? I think the author says it well: "I'd like to say, in this book, that my story isn't important. The point is not what happened to me. I'm writing about it to make visible the lives of so many thousands of other women. They have no voice, so let this one life stand for their story." (p.207) Will we listen to the voice? She also says, "I spent a lot of time thinking about why, in Cambodia, people felt justified in treating women and children this way." (p.167) "Trying to explain it is not what I do. I keep my head down and try to help one girl after another. It is a big enough task." (p.203)If we want to ask why, the cause is so wide in scope and deep-rooted that it will paralyse us. We should keep asking why, but it should not stop us from firefighting.

Finally, I think her observation is spot on, when she says,"It's a global industry and for some reason the world puts up with it." (p.180) "Sometimes it's hard to convince the donors to visit...We have a great deal of support from many people around the world, and for that we are very grateful. But we sometimes have the impression that for the benefactors giving money is a way of getting rid of the problem - they don't want to hear any more about it." (Are we guilty as charged?) "But it goes without saying that we can't do this work alone. It's too big for us. We want our action to be part of a whole chain of action, because it is not enough to look after some of the victims: we want the traffic in women to end." (p.182) Something for us to reflect on; it is indeed mind-boggling how the demand seems insatiable, and in turn profits lucrative in this trade to sustain and deepen it. When we can go to our warm bed at night and sleep soundly, these girls can't as they forever have nightmares, and the workers put their own life on the line too rescuing these girls. What should we do? It's up to us to decide how we would like to follow up the awakening of our conscience.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars very moving, 3 Aug. 2008
By 
Paul (Birmingham, West Midlands United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This book raises lots of questions for me. Somaly Mam is a modern day Mother Theresa.
But how do so many, many people get to be so indifferent or normalised to - to use her blunt words - rape? That's what haunts me from reading this. I've read about Cambodia's history. But still. I still don't get it. She says as much, too.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unputdownable - a story of a very different life, 20 Jan. 2008
By 
P. L. Brennan "winanoscar" (Leeds UK) - See all my reviews
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Well written,so very interesting,thought provoking,touches the heart and is also inspiring. An unusual story of a different kind of life. Make time to read this book because I really had to force myself to break off when necessity called. A book I will read again and buy copies for friends. In a word: EXCELLENT.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars EVERYONE should read this, especially men !, 1 Dec. 2009
By 
This is both shocking and disturbing that this is a reality for many children and girls in the World.

We think we have hardship in the West, for the majority we truly are unthankful and ungrateful and dont know what hardship is! It would help everyone if they had to study something like this at school....would recommend as a captivating read for men women and youth.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Disturbing but necessary reading, 9 May 2010
By 
This review is from: The Road Of Lost Innocence (Paperback)
Somaly Mam is an amazing woman, and she has written an amazing book. An utterly disturbing and haunting book which tells her own life story as well as focuses on the factors in Cambodia and its neighbouring countries which allow the exploitation, rape, forced prostitution and slavery of women and girls. It is a horrific story but Somaly Mam tells it in gentle terms but also with a certain natural distance. Her ability to overcome the terrible things that were done to her during her childhood and youth is almost as impressive as her present struggle against the corrupt police and central administration in Cambodia.

The situation in Cambodia today is even worse than when Somaly Mam was growing up, so her fight for freedom and respect for the young girls and women held in giant brothels has never been more relevant. Read this book before going on holiday in Cambodia, Thailand or Vietnam!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read, 6 April 2008
By 
Suzanne Fox - See all my reviews
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I agree with the previous reviewer, completely unputdownable.
I bought this book yesterday and have finished it already.
Everyone should read this book...the first step to action is awareness.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Shocking and moving, 20 Mar. 2010
By 
Natalie J. Mounter (Australia) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Road Of Lost Innocence (Paperback)
This book is written with suitable directness and shocking honesty. As a result, is it extremely moving and, like many others who have read it, i was unable to put it down and read it one day. Despite the disturbing content, you will not be sorry you picked it up. It opens your eyes to the plight of so many unfortunate women and girls, and the story of the writer herself is both touching and inspiring. This book will have a lasting effect on you.
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The Road Of Lost Innocence by Somaly Mam (Paperback - 3 Dec. 2009)
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