Customer Reviews


108 Reviews
5 star:
 (80)
4 star:
 (16)
3 star:
 (5)
2 star:
 (5)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


38 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very touching novel
While the classic "Rebecca" is widely regarded as Daphne du Maurier's best work, I believe that "Frenchman's Creek" is also worthy of recognition. This is a lovely tale of an upper-class woman who is bored of her pompous daily life and desperately desires the freedom to do as she pleases, and as I found this theme interesting I was absorbed in the novel from the first...
Published on 10 Jun. 2005 by J. McKay

versus
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully written escapism
A holiday in Cornwall would not be complete without a Du Maurier to read. I have just reread this one many years after I first enjoyed it, and I still loved it.
Dona St Columb is a spoilt aristocratic lady who is married to a man that she doesn't care for. She has indulged in wilder and wilder pranks in order to keep boredom at bay, becoming the talk of London in the...
Published on 3 Dec. 2007 by Elizabeth Trigg


‹ Previous | 1 211 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

38 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very touching novel, 10 Jun. 2005
This review is from: Frenchman's Creek (VMC) (Paperback)
While the classic "Rebecca" is widely regarded as Daphne du Maurier's best work, I believe that "Frenchman's Creek" is also worthy of recognition. This is a lovely tale of an upper-class woman who is bored of her pompous daily life and desperately desires the freedom to do as she pleases, and as I found this theme interesting I was absorbed in the novel from the first page. As ever, du Maurier uses extensive, sophisticated vocabulary, which makes this novel a great challenge for teenagers and upwards, but possibly too difficult to follow for younger readers. While this novel is not a relentless page-turner, the plot is more adventurous than that of other du Maurier novels and I found myself wishing to read on more often than not, eager to discover what Lady Dona and her newly found true love, Jean-Pierre Aubery, would encounter next as they sailed on Aubery's pirate ship.
If you are not a romance or history lover, do not be discouraged from purchasing this wonderful novel. I generally stay clear of this genre, but I thoroughly enjoyed reading "Frenchman's Creek"; the romance is slight and is not over-the-top. The characters have been deeply thought out and are in no way superficial, while du Maurier's carefully chosen words perfectly paint a picture of the beautiful setting, whether it is in the middle of the English Channel or at the trademark grand house in the midst of breathtaking gardens. A refreshing read for lovers of intelligently written work.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars blown away, 28 July 2005
This review is from: Frenchman's Creek (VMC) (Paperback)
If you're a romantic like me or a fan of history (like me again)you've just got to read this, and even if you're not still read it (don't worry it doesnt go all soppy or go into huge long descriptions of period costume!) The book is basically about Lady Dona St Column who is bored of her life and longing, not only for some excitement, but for something with some meaning. She escapes to the cornish coast where she meats a dashing pirate wanted by all her "friends" and embarks on an exciting adventure. This is a must-read for everyone 13 and over! It'll blow you away!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully written escapism, 3 Dec. 2007
This review is from: Frenchman's Creek (VMC) (Paperback)
A holiday in Cornwall would not be complete without a Du Maurier to read. I have just reread this one many years after I first enjoyed it, and I still loved it.
Dona St Columb is a spoilt aristocratic lady who is married to a man that she doesn't care for. She has indulged in wilder and wilder pranks in order to keep boredom at bay, becoming the talk of London in the process. At the opening of the story, she has finally become disgusted and ashamed of her behaviour and is fleeing with her children to her husband's remote Cornish estate. There she finds the freedom, and adventure that she has craved when a French pirate ship is moored in the creek below her house. As ever, Du Maurier's descriptions of Cornwall are beautiful, and so wonderfully evocative. The opening passage, where a modern day holiday maker ventures a little way down the mysterious and silent creek in his boat is a perfect taster for what is to come. As one other reviewer has mentioned, Du Maurier obviously wasn't striving for realism in this story. But if you are going to write about a romance between a pirate and a lady, you might as well let yourself go - which she has done most enjoyably.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Delectable!!, 8 Mar. 2004
This review is from: Frenchman's Creek (VMC) (Paperback)
This book is outstanding.Full of romance,danger and excitmeant.Another one of Daphne Du mauier's great novels.It wasn't something i was planning to read but i'm glad i did.There is nothing dull or plain about this book.I would recommend this book to anyone over 13.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Escape!!!, 16 Mar. 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Frenchman's Creek (VMC) (Paperback)
If you crave adventure and romance, read this. Dona and her Frenchman will captivate you. As you would expect from Daphne du Maurier, the language is so rich that you can see, hear, smell and taste Cornwall. This story is a joy from start to finish. Read it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One for the Girls, 13 April 2010
This review is from: Frenchman's Creek (VMC) (Paperback)
Despite being a work of fiction, this book feels as though it tells a real-life tale of the author's personal feelings of isolation and longing. Set in the reign of Charles II, `Frenchman's Creek' tells the story of the restless and unhappy Lady Dona St Columb, who flees London after playing a practical joke on an unfortunate countess, egged on by the rake Rockingham. Feeling guilty about what she has done and unhappy at what her life has become, she seeks isolation at her husband's Cornish estate and finds joy in the simple pleasures of playing with her children and exploring the coast. On one such walk, she encounters a French pirate, Jean Aubrey, and her life takes an unexpected turn... Du Maurier wrote this book while in Langley End, Hertfordshire, away from the wild Cornish landscape which she loved, perhaps inspiring Dona's sense of longing in the story. Also, according to Sheila Hodges, Du Maurier's editor, Dona carries many of the authors own feelings about wanting to be a boy, the Cornish countryside and her passion for freedom (P. 30, the Daphne Du Maurier Companion, Ed. Helen Taylor). This was certainly the feeling I got while reading the book. Unfortunately, this view of the female experience has become a bit of a cliché in recent years and as a modern feminist, it made me a bit uncomfortable. I stuck with the book, however, and am glad that I did because the pace and adventure quickens as the story progresses, leading to a satisfying ending. Although I don't feel this is Du Maurier's best work and wouldn't recommend it to a first time reader (unless in their mid-teens!), it was enjoyable and should be accepted for what it is - a bit of romantic escapism.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb reading of this classic., 6 Jan. 2004
By 
brindybob "foxhole" (Nr.Penryn, Cornwall United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
John Castle's reading gives real feeling to this wonderful audiobook, his pace is good and once listening, one forgets it a man reading-one is taken directly into the plot,such is his skill. Unhurried and excellent quality recording.Unabridged at 8 hours.45 mins.[6 casettes] The plot is set in the latter part of 17th.century Cornwall, on the Helford river and it's mysterious and winding creeks. The charcters spring to life, and once begun, cannot stop listening!Highly recommended both as a romantic story and as a high quality reading and recording.Never tire of listening to this one,I will never part with it!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Romance, the wild ocean, and finding your inner pirate..., 22 Aug. 2009
By 
This review is from: Frenchman's Creek (Paperback)
I started this book with a few expectations, I suppose. On some I was correct - the plot, of which I knew a little, is straight out of Mills and Boon, for example... On others I was not. Having 'Rebecca' as my only du Maurier reference point so far, I was interested to find that 'Frenchman's Creek' could have been written by an entirely different writer. The only obvious similarity stems from the descriptive prose, which I recognised from the haunting passages about the path down through the rhodedendrons to the little cove in 'Rebecca'.

'Frenchman's Creek' is like a very, very well written trashy romance novel. Mills and Boon taken a few welcome steps in the right direction. Or maybe Pocahontas in reverse - wild man arrives and turns everything upside down, teaching civilised woman her own strength in the process. Basic plot: Lady Dona St Columb leaves London for the family retreat, Navron House in Cornwall, to escape her oafish husband and her bad behaviour in the face of her sheer boredom. At Navron she can enjoy the sun and the garden and find her 'inner Dona', the woman she has always wanted to be. Then she hears about a ruthless French pirate and his marauding crew who have been terrorising the coastline, robbing the wealthy and escaping into thin air... and so the tale really begins.

Even at its climax, the novel is far gentler in its manner than 'Rebecca', but this isn't by any means a bad thing. Althought it starts in a slightly dry fashion and occasionally slows enough for a bit of cliche and clunk to show through, I really appreciated the lyrical descriptions of Cornwall and the exploration of love and freedom. Likewise, though the characters aren't really fleshed out as much as I might have liked, the two sets of conflicting individuals, experiences and values at its core play against each other very well. I'll definitely be reading more Du Maurier and I'm looking forward to seeing where her style and stories will take me next.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 25 Nov. 2008
This review is from: Frenchman's Creek (VMC) (Paperback)
Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier is my favourite book so I am always a bit anxious when I read anything else by her although I loved My Cousin Rachel.
I have to say that I was not disappointed, unfortunately I hurt my back last week so was forced into a very upright chair with a bag of frozen peas to ease the pain; I couldn't really do much but read and this book was perfect for such an occasion. Once I had started reading I could not put it down and it was finished within two days.
The main character is Lady Dona St Columb- she is beautiful and rebellious and in search of an escape from the courtly life which she has to share with her odious husband. She takes leave to Navron House; the family estate in Cornwall, leaving her husband and her other persona behind. At first Dona is content in enjoying the solitude and playing with her children. Yet everything changes when she accidentally comes across a sailing ship anchored in the hidden creek on the estate; this leads her to an encounter with the enigmatic Captain Jean Aubrey. As the two become close she involves herself in a dangerous plot to steal another ship- exactly the kind of excitement she had been yearning for.
Daphne Du Maurier does what she does best with this book and challenges the reader. On face-value this book could seem like a very typical romance with the lady of the manor falling for the mysterious, dangerous man that she knows full well she should really avoid. However, there is more to it than that; I really struggled with my opinion of Dona throughout the book. Initially I was pleased that she had escaped her annoying husband and then excited when she meets her match in Jean Aubrey but then you are led to question whether she should really have just left her children just so she could go on an adventure. So towards the last few chapters I found myself disliking her a little as I saw her to be selfish yet I still wanted her to have a happy ending. For me though this is what I love about the author; she raises so many issues with such clever subtlety that you know when you have finished that it was not just some soppy romance novel but that you will be thinking about it long after you have turned the last page.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The most romantic of Du Maurier's novels, 7 May 2009
This review is from: Frenchman's Creek (VMC) (Paperback)
Exquisitely crafted, mesmerisingly descriptive and rather more warm hearted that some of Du Maurier's other work, the reader is transported back to a beautiful 17th century Cornish summer, into which Lady Dona St Columb retreats from London society.

Dona; beautiful, scandalous and the mother of two small children, is fast approaching thirty and searching both for courageous adventure and for an equally elusive peace of mind. The startling entrance of Jean Aubrey, philosopher, gentleman and wanted pirate into Dona's existance seems to answer her unvoiced desires, but the noose is tightening both figuratively as regards Dona's resonsibilites to her family, and literally as the law decides once and for all to banish the scourge of piracy...

Adventure and desirous abandonment war with responsibility and obligation in this exciting tale of hearts, minds and piracy. The poignant, poetic relationship between Dona and her pirate is all the more fascinating because they are not star crossed, starry-eyed teenage lovers, but adults with life experience behind them and responsibilities they are bound to undertake. The plot is the perfect escapism where love, even between a lady and a pirate, is possible and yet the end of adventure can bring with it, not dissapointment, but lasting peace of mind. A warm, witty love story that powerfully contrasts pessimism and monotony.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 211 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Frenchman's Creek (VMC)
Frenchman's Creek (VMC) by Daphne Du Maurier (Paperback - 1 May 2003)
£6.79
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews