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Published 3 months ago by Gemma

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3.0 out of 5 stars William Samuel
Year 8 students from Central Foundation Boys' School have studied this period in depth. They were asked to agree/disagree with Godfrey and Lawrence's claim that `By the final quarter of the nineteenth century, both the idea and experience of policing had undergone a dramatic change. What has subsequently been popularly perceived as a "golden age" of policing had...
Published 18 months ago by William Samuel


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3.0 out of 5 stars William Samuel, 18 Jun 2013
This review is from: Crime and Justice 1750-1950 (Paperback)
Year 8 students from Central Foundation Boys' School have studied this period in depth. They were asked to agree/disagree with Godfrey and Lawrence's claim that `By the final quarter of the nineteenth century, both the idea and experience of policing had undergone a dramatic change. What has subsequently been popularly perceived as a "golden age" of policing had begun.'

They said:
I think the golden age was in 1829 - 1848 because they had lots of improvements and that's when the police was created.
I disagree with Godfrey and Lawrence (they said 1875 onwards is the golden age) because at that time there was a lot of high suicide rates making the police look bad and there are less police officers it was stagnated . Furthermore, there were commissioners that resigned because they were not doing a good job making it look bad for the police. I think 1829 - 1848 was the golden age because they created the police and they were doing well and they made detectives to find out the murders that happened.
In conclusion, I think the late 19th century was not the golden age and I think it was during the earlier period of the 19th century.

I disagree with Godfrey and Lawrence because I believe there was a certain time period where the police were at their greatest point. This period of golden policing was from 1849-1879. For example this was when the CID was first set up, when they acquired nine new police stations and also when the use of hand ambulance was introduced! This was a steady change as it wasn't rapid neither sluggish they progressed at an even pace.

I disagree with B.Godfrey and P.Lawrence, because we believe that there wasn't a golden age, not even today! If you think about it the "golden age" is never going to happen because we are advancing daily and will never be able to perfect anything we do! Also problems are happening every day!
In the 19th century there was a high suicide rate from the police department, also "Jack the Ripper" caused grief for the police department throughout the 19th century. Also during this time period Sir Charles warren resigns from the police force.

I think the golden age was not very sudden but happened in a very slow pace. I think this because the sources that I read showed that it was and wasn't a golden age. This came to tell me that the golden age for policing wasn't very golden after all. Policing became a golden age during the middle of that time because that's when the police stated to react at a vast amount. Towards the end of the time span around 1901 policing started to fall, due to sir Charles resigning because he wasn't able to catch Jack the riper!

I think that the quote made by B. Godfrey and P. Lawrence is true because `the final quarter of the nineteenth century' is also known as the years 1825-1900which is when great evolutions is the police force were made such as the Bertillon system (which is the use of forensics to find criminals)these also included the use of finger prints, but this wasn't though to be important until 1901 where the bureau of finger prints was introduced, but this period in this period in time had extremely low moments as well because there was a large protest in Trafalgar square where a commission was forced to resign from his post and another was had resigned because of the jack the ripper incident and this is though to be the reason of the high suicide rate of police officers
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 17 Sep 2014
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This review is from: Crime and Justice 1750-1950 (Paperback)
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2 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Just not there, 11 April 2011
This review is from: Crime and Justice 1750-1950 (Paperback)
I had to get this book for my Masters degree.
While it has some good infomation it lacks detail, the writers seem to love to repeat themselves and part of the book just makes no sence whatsoever.
there are better books out there.
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Crime and Justice 1750-1950
Crime and Justice 1750-1950 by Paul Lawrence (Paperback - 1 Oct 2005)
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