Customer Reviews


3 Reviews
5 star:
 (1)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Minor Works
This nice little release is of two film treatments written by Greene at the peak of his career, just after 'The End of the Affair'. The two tales, 'No Man's Land' and 'A Stranger's Hand', are both barely novella length, but they grip the reader's attention in an efficient way. The former is perhaps more recognisably set in 'Greeneland', as it concerns a cold war spy...
Published on 21 Jun 2007 by Colin C

versus
0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Terrible
If you like stilted, unnatural dialogue and unbelievable situations, this is the book for you. I've lived in Germany a long time and have experienced both sides of the wall. This doesn't come close to describing reality. Don't waste your money on this drivel, the author is obviously relying on his reputation to make this unrealistic rubbish "acceptable".
Published on 10 Jan 2010 by J. Marshall


Most Helpful First | Newest First

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Minor Works, 21 Jun 2007
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: No Man's Land (Hesperus Modern Voices) (Hardcover)
This nice little release is of two film treatments written by Greene at the peak of his career, just after 'The End of the Affair'. The two tales, 'No Man's Land' and 'A Stranger's Hand', are both barely novella length, but they grip the reader's attention in an efficient way. The former is perhaps more recognisably set in 'Greeneland', as it concerns a cold war spy mission, a hesitant and flawed hero, and plenty of Catholic imagery (the climactic scenes are in a Pilgrim's Shrine). Overall it is quite a satisfying tale, and a genuine sense of danger and tension in crossing the Iron Curtain is generated. In that regard, the story is an interesting companion piece perhaps not so much to Green's greatest works such as 'The Heart of the Matter', but to earlier thrillers like 'A Gun for Hire' and 'Stamboul Train'.

'A Stranger's Hand' meanwhile, is a fairly standard tale of a young boy seperated from his mysterious father in Venice. This work is in fact unfinished and the book concludes with a summary of how the story was continued and ended in the film adaptation.

For fans of Greene's work, this nicely produced hardback book is unmissable, although I would argue that only the title story is really recognisable as a story by him.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Two stunning novellas, 17 Nov 2006
By 
HORAK (Zug, Switzerland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
The two short novels in this book are Graham Greene's two Cold-War thrillers.

In No Man's Land the main themes are security measures taken by the Russians against information on the uranium workings on the Czech-Austrian border and a kind of Teresa Neumann character who attracts religious pilgrims from outside the area. Actually Greene later changed that aspect of the story in favour of a visitation from the Virgin Mary herself, who appears, holding a rose, to two children, in an area that had recently come under the control of the Russian occupying forces in the Harz mountains. Greene wanted to exploit the recent uranium discoveries at Eisleben in the Soviet zone.

In both stories the personal and political are entwined. Then Stranger'sHand features the plight of an eight-year boy, Roger Court, who is posted like a parcel by his aunt to a strange city, Venice, to meet a long-absent father who fails to turn up. Greene writes memorably about an alienated childhood and the rituals with which the boy seeks to distract himself, the improvised game of cricket, and the moments when his courage and self-control suddenly give way to helpless tears, are beautifully judged. Here again the background is Cold War espionage and intrigue so that the confrontation across the frontiers of disputed territory serves as a metaphor for moral and emotional disconnection.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Terrible, 10 Jan 2010
By 
J. Marshall (Oxford, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: No Man's Land (Hesperus Modern Voices) (Hardcover)
If you like stilted, unnatural dialogue and unbelievable situations, this is the book for you. I've lived in Germany a long time and have experienced both sides of the wall. This doesn't come close to describing reality. Don't waste your money on this drivel, the author is obviously relying on his reputation to make this unrealistic rubbish "acceptable".
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

No Man's Land (Hesperus Modern Voices)
No Man's Land (Hesperus Modern Voices) by James Sexton (editor) (Hardcover - 18 Nov 2005)
£9.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews