Customer Reviews


7 Reviews
5 star:
 (4)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


20 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant
This is a fascinating, original, and utterly absorbing study of the Eighteenth Century. It is worth buying for the illustrations alone! Gatrell writes with warmth and insight - this is what literary history should be!
Published on 26 Oct 2007 by R. Wright

versus
3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Excess... good or bad?
I wrote a review of this book a few years ago but oddly enough it seems to have disappeared.

Essentially I said that this was an excellent book for its picture record of comic prints of the eighteenth century, but that the reader is likely to weary of the insistent maleness of it all (the bodily functions, the fact that the pictures repeat the same two or three...
Published on 25 Aug 2008 by A. Crowther


Most Helpful First | Newest First

20 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 26 Oct 2007
By 
R. Wright (Methil) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is a fascinating, original, and utterly absorbing study of the Eighteenth Century. It is worth buying for the illustrations alone! Gatrell writes with warmth and insight - this is what literary history should be!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars massive, 6 Jan 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
love this book, can just pick it up and read any page and it will make you smile, love the 18th century and this is one of the best, big heavy gorgeous book, all round one to treasure well done loved it....
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars city of laughter, 30 Aug 2009
By 
C. O. Smith (East Sussex United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: City of Laughter: Sex and Satire in Eighteenth-century London (Hardcover)
very well written,and well illustrated
would recommend to anyone who likes books with reference to the
18th century.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic book with lovely illustrations - and a sense of humour, 14 Sep 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is worth buying for the illustrations alone.

But the rest is great too, despite the velvet clawed cattiness of academics in other reviews (why on earth should this be 'less male' and why should this author have waffled on about feminist theory? I bet your books are tedious if you do that, love!)

Wonderful explanations and detail - and unlike most academic books, it is well-written with panache and verve - and a sense of humour.

This is THE book to buy on this period and to learn about Gillray's world. Read it or dip into it before any other.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Excess... good or bad?, 25 Aug 2008
By 
A. Crowther (Bradford, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I wrote a review of this book a few years ago but oddly enough it seems to have disappeared.

Essentially I said that this was an excellent book for its picture record of comic prints of the eighteenth century, but that the reader is likely to weary of the insistent maleness of it all (the bodily functions, the fact that the pictures repeat the same two or three jokes repeated ad nauseam, the "robust" chauvinism of the attitudes, etc.) It is a book of excess, and depending on your point of view excess is either just what's needed or... excessive.

The writer is understandably enamoured of his subject, but this means his approach is unbalanced, and he fails to take into account that modern attitudes may show an advance on the 18th century (eg the insistence that prostitutes were jolly because Rowlandson depicted them as such, and that Victorians were just being killjoys for suggesting otherwise).

So two stars knocked off for scholarship; I remember writing in my original review that Gatrell's text would have been much better for a little reading in feminist theory. But for enthusiasm and especially for the very generous selection of print reproductions, at least three stars.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I wish I liked it better, 8 Feb 2012
By 
Peasant (Deepest England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Three stars, sez Amazon, means "It's OK". I wish I could give it 4 ("I like it") but it defeated me. It should have been so much fun. Before Victorian prudery clamped down a lid of stern disapproval on British behaviour, we were a rowdy, randy lot. The cartoons of Georgian England are Rabelasian, earthy and frequently libellous. The wave of bad behaviour - and of artistic depiction of same - crested in the Regency, and happily this book deals with the "long 18th century"; the four Georges and even, to avoid an abrupt cut-off, tailing off into the 1840s.

There is no doubt Catrell is the master of the subject; the book is authoritative, indeed exhaustive. For, sadly, the light-hearted nature of his subject matter has failed to rub off on him and, for all its intrinsic interest, this is far from being a light read. To be literal, the book itself (printed throughout on glazed paper) is heavy enough to make your arms hurt; don't try it last thing at night unless you fancy combining your bedtime reading with a little weight-lifting.

I feel mean criticising this book on this account; clearly two other reviewers loved every word. And don't get me wrong, the book is full of stuff. I just wish the author's style had been lighter, the print less microscopic, and a good editor had persuaded him to cut the word-count drastically. On the plus side, that heavy paper means the illustrations are numerous, good quality and inset in the text; something which goes quite a way to counterbalance my other quibbles.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Fielding, Cleland and others did a better job - and wrote better., 15 July 2013
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A guide for the prurient with prim circumspection and no literary skill. The 18th century in London was richer in thought, less inhibited in action and much more multi-faceted than this pale review.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

City of Laughter: Sex and Satire in Eighteenth-century London
City of Laughter: Sex and Satire in Eighteenth-century London by Vic [V.A.C.] Gatrell (Hardcover - 12 Oct 2006)
Used & New from: £7.39
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews