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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Essential for any Bond or Moore fans....
An abridged version of the recently released Roger Moore biography read by the great man himself - which is a big bonus. Extremely witty, enjoyable and modest, this will have you longing for Moore (pardon the pun) after listening to the two and a half hour running time of this two disk set. Disk one takes a very in depth look at his childhood (i had no idea he spent time...
Published on 16 Oct. 2008 by Mr. Matthew C. Wolski

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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Stirred But Not Shaken
This is a very interesting and amusing book, but sadly Mr Moore fails to allow the reader to get anywhere near his heart. We read a great deal about his happy childhood (notwithstanding the Blitz and evacuation) and his long and successful career - in which he appears to have either met or worked with almost everybody important in the entertainment industry - but we don't...
Published on 28 Oct. 2011 by Big Andy


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Moore like this, please!, 12 Mar. 2009
By 
Victor (Hull, England) - See all my reviews
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This really is a charming audiobook. Roger Moore, best known for his role as James Bond, reveals himself to be a witty, modest and captivating speaker. Unlike many celebrities, this isn't a 'me me me' tale, or a point scoring exercise. It's the story of a very likeable chap who has quite appropriately made it big, and happens to have done some interesting things and met some interesting people along the way. As Roger Moore reads you are caught up in the fascinating story of someone who really can be described as a Gentleman. You get the impression that the suave sophisticate with the wide streak of gallantry and biting humour seen in Bond was actually quite close to the real Roger Moore. He has a story to tell, and it's quite fascinating. It also helps that he has an excellent reading voice. After listening to it I was left wanting Moore, and am now off to get the book so as to get the full, unabridged, story.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Light read, not terrible, 22 Jun. 2009
By 
Charles "mrfreedom" (England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: My Word Is My Bond (Hardcover)
Moore's anecdotes are okay-ish - they're not bad but a lot of them aren't great. Delivered by the man himself at a dinner table or on a chat show they would presumably be sublime, but not always here. Plus, a few of them are quite difficult to understand. I have no idea what the story about the Grace Jones love scene concerns, I really don't. He doesn't tell the story properly.
Moore comes across as just a tad - just a tad - supercilious, but then a lot of celebrity memoirs read like this. I was a bit disappointed that so many of the anecdotes involve f-words or c-words, but that seems to be the celebrity way.
It's okay holiday reading, for maybe three days, but no classic: nowhere near the standard of Errol Flynn's My Wicked Wicked Ways for instance.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A truly great English gentleman, 19 Feb. 2010
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This review is from: My Word is My Bond: The Autobiography (Hardcover)
It is a fact of modern life that many people publish biographies when, in truth, they have achieved little or are at the start of their careers. Of course who can blame them? Usually they are being packaged by a marketing team keen to exploit their brief flicker of celebrity in order to maximise their earnings while they can - I guess that many of us, if in a similar position would do the same. Anyway, this book, as you will be aware, is nothing like that.
I grew up in the 1970s and always saw Roger Moore as the archetypal English gent, whether he was fooling around with Tony Curtis in The Persuaders or saving the world as Bond whilst bedding a string of beauties along the way. His performances were always so effortless (and similar!) that it is easy to believe that this was who he was in real life. However, the reality was that Roger Moore hails from humble origins in south London and he grew up not too far from Michael Caine. He describes his background, drive for success and his career with considerable modesty. A considerable strength of the book and, I suggest, of his character, is that he refrains from dishing dirt on people he has worked with along the way. If that's what you're after the internet supplies plenty of suitable websites. Granted there are times when one can read between the lines but even then he is extremely gracious in how he describes the characteristics of some of the more highly strung people in his trade.
Roger Moore will never be regarded as a 'Laurence Olivier' style of actor and nor does he claim to be. In this book you get a real sense of the man, his work and what drives him, in particular the amazing work he has achieved for Unicef. Yes, there's the trappings of wealth and glamour plus the occasional grimmace (usually with a good dollop of humour) but this is due to his honesty rather than a desire to produce a work that is only favourable to his own conceit. What emerges is an actor and a man with a longevity of career and breadth of work that deserves more credit than has being generated by the infamous 'moving eyebrow' Spitting Image puppet that many of us will remember.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of the good guys, 31 May 2009
One of the more regrettable aspects of SPITTING IMAGE in the 1980s was the fact that it managed to diminish the public perception of Roger Moore as an actor. This is a pity, because, despite the fact that he is too much of a gentleman to take himself that seriously, he has created, over an incredibly long and successful career a body of work that has been much admired around the world (His Simon Templar remains the most popular to many people, and despite recently falling out of favour, his James Bond was undeniably hugely popular), and, to be blunt, if he wasn't a good at what he does, he would never have been that successful.

In this book he is typically self-deprecating about his abilities and puts a great deal of his life down to being lucky, but I think that you get to see behind that a person dedicated to the work he does and as caring about the final product as any who might be considered greater actors. Maybe many of the roles he has been offered and played haven't stretched him (but then that could be said of many movie stars), and maybe he was just very comfortable at being himself on screen, but rarely has he given less than 100% and he is a genuine movie star.

He is also very true to his adage that "if you can't say anything nice about someone, don't say anything at all" so this is not a "warts and all" look into the darker corners of his life, of which, it seems there have been quite a few. He doesn't hold back from naming those he doesn't like, but leaves it at that and instead concentrates on the many friendships and happy times of a life, on the whole, much enjoyed. And hurrah for that! Too many autobiographies concentrate on the sleaze instead of the sunshine, but (Sir) Roger is too much of a gentleman for that kind of thing and instead is an entertaining and erudite companion through the story of his life. The later sections of the book concentrate on both his health problems and, to a much more satisfying extent, his work for UNICEF of which he seems justly proud and which seems to have given him more pleasure generally than his acting career did. The final chapter, an A-Z of the countries he has visited for UNICEF and his experiences therein does tend to put any thespian fluff into a much more real perspective.

So, on the whole, a likable book about a very liked man. No real Saint, I'm sure he'd be the first to admit, but still one of the good guys.

My paperback copy did, rather strangely, have the same photograph section included twice, instead of two separate distinct ones, I expect, which I imagine was a publishing error. I was more interested in the text anyway, so it didn't bother me, but is worth checking if you intend this as a gift or if that sort of thing bothers you.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Charming................., 21 Oct. 2008
By 
This review is from: My Word is My Bond: The Autobiography (Hardcover)
My sister is a major Roger Moore fan so I bought this for her as an early Christmas present - I have to say I had a sneaky peak and once I started reading I could not put it down - loved it - what a charming read it was. A great tone and it was just so funny. This is a proper autobiography by someone who has lead a life and a half. I love old fashioned Hollywood stories and there are plenty in here to keep me happy.
Will have to buy a new copy for my sister as this one is staying firmly on my bookcase!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Moore, please!, 28 Oct. 2009
This review is from: My Word is My Bond: The Autobiography (Hardcover)
If Sir Roger Moore were to be hit by the current recession, I would be mightily surprised; over the years, he's shrewdly managed his finances as well as his career. No-one could accuse Moore of being a great actor, but he's a very competent one and a great screen presence who has always acted well within his limitations.

Now, he's turned his talents to writing and I believe that this is the best film star's autobiography I've read since Niven's `The Moon's a Balloon.' There's an art in storytelling and Moore has captured it. A natural raconteur, it's not always easy or indeed possible to turn one's talents from the spoken word into the written one but Moore has achieved it and very well written his stories are, too.

His account of the confrontation between his then wife, Dorothy Squires and the comedian, Lennie Bruce, had me in stitches and this, plus his very nicely laconic accounts of other high and low points in his career all add up to a very readable book.

His chum, David Niven, followed up his initial success with another book about the Hollywood glitterati; I wonder if Sir Roger Moore will? If he does, I shall be the first in the queue for a copy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My Word is My Bond: The Autobiography, 9 Mar. 2014
By 
B. Dunn "badunn" (Maldon) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: My Word is My Bond: The Autobiography (Hardcover)
I enjoyed the book. I enjoyed RMs style of writing. You can understand, after reading this, why he played Bond the way he did. There are plenty of quips, and little self jaunts at himself - which makes him an even more likeable person. There's even some quite choice language he's quoted some very famous British actors saying - which even raised my eyebrow (sorry!) He recognised his limitations - but played to their strengths - which is why he got away with it. No - he didn't get away with it - he made a Bond interpretation that millions loved. His work with UNICEF is so commendable. A good read; a nice guy.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Does what it says on the cover, 24 Oct. 2009
By 
Jo D'Arcy (Portsmouth, UK) - See all my reviews
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Roger Moore's word is his bond. A wonderful autobiography which if you are looking for warts and all about others he has worked with then you will be sorely disappointed. Even when in the story you come across Moore working with Grace Jones in a Bond film, he readily admits that he would rather not say anything. That to me speaks volumes. So less is probably Moore in this autobiography's case.

Moore starts from the very beginning and we are introduced to him from birth, what follows is his journey throughout childhood, on stage, on TV and into films as well as his many sojourns into hospital and it becomes apparent that although he calls himself a `hypochondriac' he has merely had a run of bad luck. There are many tales about his time as `The Saint' and also the `Persuaders' shows which I have never seen but that did not matter, as I learnt much about them from this book. Perhaps the Bond films could have been covered a bit more, but I sense from reading that although they were fun to make there was a lot of wrangling behind the scenes before the finished article was premiered and perhaps it is best not to ruin an illusion that has been created and still survives to this day.

Moore is honest in his life with his wives, I knew he had been married more than once, but did not realise, he had been married 4 times. I hope from the reading that he has found solace and peace with Kristina. Honesty is shown throughout his descriptions of UNICEF. Again like other reviewers I thought this was a recent venture but it has been going on behind the scenes for many years. Moore and his family, as he got them involved, have tirelessly travelled the world to see children in the poor circumstances they have to live, work and play in. Parts of this brought a tear to my eye. Forget that a famous film actor is telling you this, this is really happening out there.

A good autobiography, which covers from beginning of life to the here and now. Told in anecdotes in some places throughout the book, it feels like as he was writing, another memory popped up and that was recorded, even if it did not fall into a true timeline. It is clear that this is not all his own work and Gareth Owen who obviously helped him is given recognition at the front of the book and in Moore's thanks. Do not let this put you off though, as I sometimes do if it is not all their own work and narrative, here it works for this actor and his autobiography.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful read and insight into a British tv/movie icon, 19 Sept. 2009
By 
Jeffery Keast "Bobbybaggio" (Gloucester, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: My Word is My Bond: The Autobiography (Hardcover)
Read this book on holiday last week and couldn't put it down. The book very much comes from the soul of Roger Moore briefly highlighting a happy but eventful childhood and upbringing during the war years before charting his early attempts to get into acting and then recruitment into the British army. His writing is charming, witty and often hilarious, the chapters detailing his early break into movie making are the big highlight of the book as you realise some of the big stars that he worked with before his big break with the TV show The Saint. He describes fondly his relationships with Lew Grade, David Niven and Tony Curtis, the funny stories associated with various directors and writers are a delight. The Bond years are covered over a reasonable number of pages but in decreasing detail as each film passes. The disappointment for me was that his work on The Wild Geese was only described briefly over a couple of pages, I would liked to have read more about what it was like to work with the screen greats that were Richard Burton and Richard Harris and what it was like to film in such a difficult environment as South Africa under apartheid. The later part of the book covers his charity work with UNICEF which has obviously given him much satisfaction. Some of the name dropping that he does in the second half of the book does grate a little, a man of his stature shouldn't need to turn to such sickly measures but this is a small gripe. Roger Moore is a man who is truly grateful for what life has given him, a great career and a loving family, and this warmth and joy comes through in abundance in his book. Highly recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not very revealing!, 11 July 2010
By 
V. Ballinger "Remy booker" (France) - See all my reviews
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A gentle read - great to have on holiday or around the pool but Roger Moore has deliberately remained more than discreet about his life. I sometimes wonder why celebrities bother to "write" an autobiography if they can't be completely honest. Whilst readers don't want salacious details, we do buy biographical books to inform us about the person in whom we're interested.

As I said a gentle read about a man who perhaps has achieved more in his life after retiring from films. The work he has done and still does with UNICEF is admirable.
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My Word is My Bond: The Autobiography by Roger Moore (Hardcover - 2 Oct. 2008)
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