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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Zakia's story
I had to read it, if only for the name of the main character. I bought the book 12 years ago and it gathered dust for a couple of years before I read it. But when I well got down to reading it, it opened a whole new world for me. Nawal El-Saadawi is not only one of the absolutely best novelists ever to come out of the Middle East, she is also one of the best novelists...
Published on 18 Jun 2008 by Zakia Khan

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3.0 out of 5 stars 'We are God's slaves when it's time to say our prayers only But we are the mayor's slaves all the time'
The god in the title is not a deity but the mayor of a small village where, assisted by his henchmen, he governs with total corruption- forcing young girls to work for him, abusing them and ditching them once pregnant, and even committing murder or framing the innocent to remove unwanted people.
One family in particular suffers at his hands...
Saadawi does a...
Published 20 months ago by sally tarbox


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Zakia's story, 18 Jun 2008
By 
Zakia Khan - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I had to read it, if only for the name of the main character. I bought the book 12 years ago and it gathered dust for a couple of years before I read it. But when I well got down to reading it, it opened a whole new world for me. Nawal El-Saadawi is not only one of the absolutely best novelists ever to come out of the Middle East, she is also one of the best novelists alive.

Zakia's story is haunting. I was never quite sure whether it was set in modern day Egypt or at a point in history, but somehow it dedn't matter. It was a beautiful portrait of an ordinary woman's plight - of powerlessness and strength. I don't know whether Saadawi is shortlisted for the nobel prize in literature (all her books are amazing) - she ought to be.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why Does God Die By The Nile?, 19 Jun 2001
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Well Read "saro319" (Norhampton England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
God Dies By The Nile was my introduction to Nawal Saadawi's novels. It has remained a firm favourite that is frequently revisited. A master of her craft, this medical doctor and Egyptian feminist writes about Arab women's passions, dilemmas, and their refusal to be bowed that resonates with many women in the West. A story of vengeance, Zakiya the central character leaps from the first page as a woman of some mystery and defiance. The tension created is immediate through Saadawi's portrait of the unbowed woman and the juxtaposition of her shuffling resigned water buffalo. Those two opposing contrasts have layers of meaning. Zakiya, a poor peasant, is focused upon some distant horizon. A single minded woman with a mission The contrast of the water buffalo is a device that draws the reader into the story. One immediately begins to ask questions. Who is this woman and what is the horizon of her thoughts? As to the book title, that is also intriguing. Why does God die by the Nile? There is no way I can do justice to the story other than to state, that the first page captures the reader to go with the central character to find out the answers to the questions that it evokes. Past reviewers have described the book as a tale of lust and deception, but also a political allegory. As a favourite Saadawi novel, it has to be given five stars.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Egypistian Nietziche, 22 July 2013
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Wow, greed and lust has no bounds. The message may read too fantastic for a Western reader but all too real for anyone hailing from Middle East. I think the book wonderfully depicts the political scene with this heart wrenching tale of helpless peasents living in a obscure village on the bank of the great Nile. Saadawi is indeed a courageous woman to have made the claim almost as big as Nietziche's that Allah is dead and is buried on the banks of the Nile. Only now can I begin to understand the impetus behind the Arab Spring. Writers like her can really help change the collective thinking of a nation. My hats off to your courage and conviction my lady.
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3.0 out of 5 stars 'We are God's slaves when it's time to say our prayers only But we are the mayor's slaves all the time', 4 Aug 2012
By 
sally tarbox (aylesbury bucks uk) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: God Dies by the Nile: 1 (Paperback)
The god in the title is not a deity but the mayor of a small village where, assisted by his henchmen, he governs with total corruption- forcing young girls to work for him, abusing them and ditching them once pregnant, and even committing murder or framing the innocent to remove unwanted people.
One family in particular suffers at his hands...
Saadawi does a good job of evoking rural life- the heat, the unceasing farm work and also the superstitious beliefs of the people. I was surprised to discover towards the end that it's actually set comparatively recently, just after the Suez/Sinai conflict - it feels as if it's much further back in time.
The author tells us this is based on a story she heard in her youth.
Quite interesting and well written although the 'angry defiance' that is quoted in every description of Zakeya became a little repetitive!
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God Dies by the Nile: 1
God Dies by the Nile: 1 by Nawal El Saadawi (Paperback - 16 Jun 2007)
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