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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars a correction to a previous review
I already have this book and was quite worried when I read a review on this site claiming that Blum had claimed Tibetans welcomed the Chinese occupation. Luckily, while the chapter in question has some faults, it claims no such thing.
I checked the chapter on China and in fact only 2 pages - 25 and 26 refer to Tibet at all. No-where in them is any reference to...
Published on 19 Jun. 2004 by Mr. Duncan Macfarlane

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8 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Mainly Latin America/ Africa
I was expecting more on Indian Sub-continent and to my amazement Mr Blum ejected CIA's cunning strategy towards Pakistan and India. Some accounts of Patrice Lumumba (Congo) are also questionable - read "Patrice Lumumba" by Kanza. Overall, not as 'in-dept' as one hoped!
Published on 11 Mar. 2001


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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars a correction to a previous review, 19 Jun. 2004
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I already have this book and was quite worried when I read a review on this site claiming that Blum had claimed Tibetans welcomed the Chinese occupation. Luckily, while the chapter in question has some faults, it claims no such thing.
I checked the chapter on China and in fact only 2 pages - 25 and 26 refer to Tibet at all. No-where in them is any reference to Tibetans welcoming the invasion or occupation. It does say that and that Tibetan guerillas opposed 'Peking rule and/or the profoundsocial changes being instituted by the revolution (serfdom and slavery were, literally, still prevalent in Tibet'). This may give the wrong impression - since it could be interpreted to mean the Chinese occupation led to a fairer or freer society while the reverse is undoubtedly the case. While Chinese human rights abuses and killings should have been mentioned for balance I feel the book is not as unbalanced as the previous reviewer suggests.
As for charges that the book is unbalanced or favours Chinese Communism here is an excerpt (from pages 26-27 - so people can check it for themselves)
'The Chinese devoted a great deal of effort to publicising their claim that the United States ....had dropped large quantities of bacteria and bacteria-laden insects over China. It presented the testimony of about 38 captured American airmen...It should be noted that some of the American's statements were so full of communist rhetoric...that their personal authorship of them must be seriously questioned. Moreover it was later learned that most of the airmen had only confessed after being subjected to physical abuse'
This seems fairly balanced to me (with the exception that in this context the euphemism 'physical abuse' should not be used in place of 'torture').
Overall I found the information in this book to be well sourced - with any problems being ommissions (e.g on Chinese human rights abuses) - but then the focus is on CIA and US military interventions - it does not pretend to analyse those of other governments and militaries.
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28 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Stars and Stripes' red? For innocent BLOOD!, 21 Feb. 1999
By A Customer
I am an honors history major and studied US history and US foreign policy. I was aware of some mistakes by the US, such as giving Japanese occupiers of Korea power and then, Korean collaborators of the Japanese over regional people's committees; ignoring the gross corruption of Chiang Kai-shek's Nationalist regime during the 1945-1949 civil war; ignoring the blatantly unfair practices of the Shah of Iran prior to the 1979 revolution; meddling in Brazil's internal affairs in the mid-1960s. But after reading this book, all I can say is that I wish it had been part of my college material, for although I read many books, this would have enriched my education.
The United States remains a wonderful country full of opportunities for its citizens and for legal immigrants who obey the law and contribute to the nation's well being; its freedoms, natural beauties, and cultural advancement are not to be questioned. But as far as American integrity abroad... The United States IS NOT a force for democracy. It has continually labeled internal rebellions and legitimately elected officials "communists" whenever Washington disliked the ruler or disagreed with the country's independent and non-hostile foreign policy.
I regret to confess that I have lost respect for the government of the US, and that I must rank it with the hypocritical Japanese government in terms of honesty about its past--it has not only been communist dictatorships that lied and used propaganda to deceive its own people. American foreign policy has killed millions of innocent people, and it is their blood that colors the red square in the Stars and Stripes.
A must reading for all history lovers and for all who really want to know what this great country of ours is doing abroad.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Spreading Democracy, 19 Aug. 2009
By 
J. R. Carroll (Sheffield) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Killing Hope: US Military and CIA Interventions Since World War II (Paperback)
A thoroughly good read and recommended for anyone studying history, politics, sociology etc. It certainly gives food for thought and prompts you ask some very searching questions, one being, hasn't the US learned anything from intervening in other countries affairs. Especially where they are not welcome by the majority of the population. The book is laid out in easy to read sections covering each country. If you are writing anything to do with a country then this is a good starting point to see how 'freely' it has developed.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Intriguing book about the perfidy of U.S. foreign policy, 10 Jun. 1997
By A Customer
Blum's work is written in an easy-to-understand style and will thoroughly shock anyone not familiar with United States escapades around the world since the end of World War II. Blum has done excellent research and discusses the incidents with a high degree of objectivity. Although he is highly critical of the United States during the Cold War, this is by no means a pro-Soviet book, for Blum condemns the actions of both superpowers in his work. Excellent reading--packed with information (the book has relatively small print so 400+ pages is a lot).
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25 of 31 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Redressing the balance, 18 Mar. 2002
By A Customer
This book is by no means a thorough investigation of world affairs nor an exercise in balanced reporting, the USA vs. 'Communism'.
It is however what it says it is, a detailed review of tactics used by the USA which have been forgotten or ommitted from general western history, which itself is slanted against other 'powers' or ideologies in order to create the idea that the allies are always 'the good guys' and can do no wrong.
This even in the face of copiuos evidence that the 'good guys' were in fact agent provocateurs and subversive, working with the aim of futhering Multi-national business and the commercial economy of the USA, Britain and its allies.
Good will, righteousness and press coverage can be shown as having served to engender this in our collective westernised society.
Hence any terrorism has to be based on Greed and Envy, instead of any nefarious actions on our behalf.
The wolrds view on Communism is both well documented and biassed. This book serves to redress the balance
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Genocide from Americans? I thought we were the good guys., 25 Jun. 1998
By A Customer
This book made my brain and american spirit look into an abyss of uncertainty and conspiratorial thinking. William Blum's book was a great account of american misdeeds from the 1950's to the fun and more loving 1990's , or so I thought. At first I began to look for holes in his story and faulty sources but that was sadly impossible and my mind began to shudder with all this book told. It was a great book because of the simple fact that for most who have been politically socialized in American homes and American schools it leaves one to come away feeling that we're just another government and just another country whos vile misdeeds will come back and scratch at our skin until the blood of truth pours from every vein. Truly this was a great book for those who believe that we're the good guys.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Never ending story., 7 May 2014
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This review is from: Killing Hope: US Military and CIA Interventions Since World War II (Paperback)
The book is well written and I see no flaws in places / names / numbers. A very convincing history lesson that focuses on the motivs. It is an eye opener with regards to the integrity of the "free press" of the western world.

Recommend the book for everyone interested i politics.
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16 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What schools don't tell ya in History class!!, 12 July 1999
By A Customer
Have you ever wondered or questioned our country's foreign policy? Then this shocking, factual book is definitely for you. I definitely recommend that you buy it. Very informative and the author has done his tedious homework on factual information(many declassified). Do not let the 400+ pages fool ya. There are no more than 10 pages per country and it is easy to take a break if need be.( I finished the book in only a few days) An oustounding altenative to our history books!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Book you need to read, 10 Jun. 2014
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This review is from: Killing Hope: US Military and CIA Interventions Since World War II (Paperback)
Very good and interesting book. I have bought it for my husband and he have read it during one week! I would recomend it to everyone who is interesting in politics.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Blum's chapters are short, well documented and eye opening., 17 May 1999
By A Customer
I was in Baghdad during the first week of the air war (Jan 91) and the Chapter on the Gulf War is extrodinary in the way it covers salient points in about 20 pages. If you need to quickly read up on the Gulf War, this is the way to do it. The rest of the chapters are also concise and to the point. The documentation is valuable and profuse - a good source for further research. I hope Mr Blum will write a 3rd edition.
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