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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars understanding what psychogeography is
This book out of all others I have looked at for understanding psychogeography - its history, influences, definition, and urban wandering and the people involved.Its an easy read and really motivates you to do your own psychogeography whilst walking - you can take yourself, your dog, friend, child or invisible traveler - who knows!
It has been so beneficial for me in...
Published on 5 Jan 2011 by nigel7738

versus
26 of 29 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing and narrow
I bought this on the strength of the other reviews and wish now I hadn't wasted my money. The book is badly produced (you need a better editor, proof reader, and setter, Mr C), is extremely narrow in its scope, and concentrates only on those aspects of the subject that are already well known.

As a subject, psychogeography predates civilization (pagan peoples...
Published on 29 May 2008 by G Talboys


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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Psychogeography by Merlin Coverley, 27 Nov 2006
A great introduction to psychogeography from Defoe and De Quincey via Debord and the Situationists and on to the present day. Lively, fluent and well researched, this book takes you on a fascinating journey through London, Paris and the literature that these cities have inspired. Highly Recommended.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good starting point, 20 Nov 2008
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I had heard about psychogeography but couldn't quite work out what people were talking about so this book provided a really good introduction. It looked at the literary tradition and the flaneur and the situationists, looking mostly at Paris and London (and very briefly New York) and it gave me a long list of novels, nonfiction books and films to look into.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Meandering., 9 Mar 2014
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Good introduction to the range of ideas, and books on the subject. Trouble is that Psychogeography is now institutionalized. Psychogeography is a lost radical field that should be reinengaged with on radical terms. We are now exploring the realm of things written about the things. None the less, Covererly encourages all to read the texts. Nowhere does he pretend to mastery. Well done.
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5.0 out of 5 stars using it for an article, 14 Aug 2013
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It has a complete overview of the concept of psychogeography which is what I wanted so good material. Very useful.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Nice intro, 24 April 2013
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Great introduction and history to the
subject and a starting point further reading about this subject for any one new to the subject
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19 of 27 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Psychogeography by Merlin Coverley, 16 Oct 2006
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Psychogeography by Merlin Coverley is a Pocket Essentials Guide book that offers an introduction to Psychogeography in an easily-digested form. Coverley's drift covers what he calls the literary tradition of psychogeogaphy and concentrates on the London-Paris axis. He traces an outline back to the surrealists' exploration of the magical city, back through John Michell, Walter Benjamin and Alfred Watkins to William Blake and forwards to J G Ballard, Iain Sinclair, Stewart Home & the London Psychogeographic Association (LPA).

I find the book valuable in both its narrow view and in what it leaves out. One thing that has been very distinctive about psychogeography is that it trangresses artificial borders and externally imposed taxonomies. Blake is known as both a radical literary figure and as the guy who did the words to "Jerusalem" that they sing at the Tory party conference. His self-published work blurred the boundaries between "literature" and "visual art" in much the same way as today's "graphic novels" do.

In the other examples Coverley refers to, the psychogeographer's work often uses text, but in a way that text dematerialises, where fiction blurs with fact, rumour and hearsay. Iain Sinclair's books are often heavily illustrated and he also regularly collaborates with photographers and film-makers. According to Jeff Nuttall's book, Bomb Culture the novellist JG Ballard, whose work is firmly rooted in surrealism as it is in the suburban landscape was also a pioneer of Installation Art. The output of the LPA has included experiments with hypertext on the [...] The LPA's publications often make no sense at all without the collision of text, photographs and diagrams. In short Psychogeography occurs as a literary stream, within hypertext. By hypertext I mean not only text that is linked to other text via mark-up language, but also text that refers to and is made up of existing texts, twisting the memetic structure of the infosphere.

While finding a centre has been a concern of many psychogeographers, it has long been clear that the centre (or Omphalos) is a shifting and a rambling thing, so it could be London, it could be Paris, but the chances are that is really elsewhere.

Within the text Coverley plays with the psychogeographers' tricks of bilocation. Stewart Home's novel 69 Things to Do With A Dead Princess, a novel apparently set in Scotland, becomes a "London Novel". So London is explored using a Hobbit's map of the Scottish stone circles.

The pocket guide probably belongs as a small chapter in a bigger book about psychogeography, but until that one is written, it is a welcome introduction to the subject.
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 23 Jan 2012
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This review is from: Psychogeography (Pocket Essentials) (Paperback)
Really well written and stimulating introduction to Psychogeography with loads of pointers as to what to read next. Book arrived very quickly.
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6 of 35 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars purely for train-spotters, 11 Oct 2011
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J. M. Pepper "buckle" (england) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Psychogeography (Pocket Essentials) (Paperback)
say no more?... Pedantic drivel. Fascinating subject though.. Now referred to as transdimentional crochet. Please write at least twenty words......
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Psychogeography (Pocket Essentials) by Merlin Coverley (Paperback - 3 Aug 2010)
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