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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE DEFINITIVE REFERENCE BOOK, 1 Oct 2001
By 
Mr. R. P. Richardson "adanaman" (Northolt, Middlesex UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Encyclopaedia of Type Faces (Paperback)
Can it really be half a century since Jaspert, Berry and Johnson produced their famous tome?
I have three editions on my bookshelf, each one improving upon its predecessor. The Encyclopaedia of Typefaces was conceived at a time when typefaces were manufactured in printing metal for print reproduction. Faces which were originally created by skilled "punch cutters", engraving upon steel, dominate the book. Those who expect to find more recent, outlandish, digital faces in the index will be disappointed, but the Encyclopaedia remains a globally unrivalled work of reference, giving designers, dates and typefoundries for all of the greatest faces created in the last 150+ years. No Graphic Designer should be without it; letterpress printers regard it as their Bible.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The definitive guide to typeface identification, 14 Nov 1999
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Mr. R. P. Richardson "adanaman" (Northolt, Middlesex UK) - See all my reviews
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The Encyclopaedia of Typefaces has been around for 40 years or more and this latest edition is a great improvement on earlier volumes. Faces are classified by a much easier system of reference, although it is still difficult to identify random designs at will. The proliferation of new typefaces, particularly since the advent of home computers, has also left the book lagging behind a little, but as no-one has yet attempted to catalogue the latest wave of typographic innovation the Jaspert/Berry/Johnson volume remains the leader in its field. A must for every printer's/designer's bookshelf.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Fonts - Their origins and development, 27 Mar 2011
This review is from: Encyclopaedia of Type Faces (Paperback)
Fonts! You just can't get away from them! This book is a guide to over 2000. What particularly interested me is the origin of the names of some of them. Garamond for instance derives from the type designer Claude Garamond, active in Paris in the 16th Century.

As a frequent user of the London Underground I could not be unaware of the sense of unity and corporate identity conferred by the 1916 Johnston sans serif typeface. I also learnt with interest that the street signage of the City of London which at first glance looks Roman is in fact Albertus which features thicker terminals to the letters rather than the serifs of traditional Roman.

I did notice however that the book does appear to have one or two omissions; for instance I could find no mention of Arial or Comic Sans. Fortunately these are detailed in a companion volume 'Just My Type' by Simon Garfield

Review by: Ken Burnett
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Encyclopaedia of Type Faces
Encyclopaedia of Type Faces by Johnson (Paperback - 26 July 2001)
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