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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A very good book ideal for those who play Inquisitor
Inquisitor follows in the footsteps of the Guant Ghost books in brining new levels of depth and detail to teh 40K univers. It is ideal for those who play inquisitor and is sure to start of several scenario ideas. The story line is fast paced with multiply twists and turns to keep you guessing what will happen next
All in all a good read
Published on 17 Jun 2001

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Pretty ok for a typical sci-fi style fiction novel
Barcode: 9781841541464

I say typical, but of course it isn't. For about 4 years i was massive fan of Games Workshop games and i got this book to read over the summer. Looking back now, it was surprising good. Warhammer 40,000 is one of the most imaginative sci-fi worlds ever and even though i don't play anymore, i still admire the world and it's workings...
Published on 28 Feb 2008 by L. Green


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A very good book ideal for those who play Inquisitor, 17 Jun 2001
By A Customer
Inquisitor follows in the footsteps of the Guant Ghost books in brining new levels of depth and detail to teh 40K univers. It is ideal for those who play inquisitor and is sure to start of several scenario ideas. The story line is fast paced with multiply twists and turns to keep you guessing what will happen next
All in all a good read
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5.0 out of 5 stars Edge-of-your-seat excitement - the true spirit of 40K, 18 Nov 2003
Dan Abnett, all your sins have been forgiven.
This is an absolutely FANTASTIC book. Abnett switches to the 1st person perspective to bring us the horrifying adventures of Inquisitor Eisenhorn, an Ordo Xenos Inquisitor (he's an alien hunter, basically). And believe me, it does get pretty grisly!
Through some of the most memorable environments ever conceived, Eisenhorn brings the Emperor's hammer down upon anyone and everyone who would try to harm humanity. And the hammer descends in sensational style. The action sequences in this book have to be read to be believed.
All of the characters genuinely suffer for the greater good, even Bequin, who throughout the Eisenhorn trilogy nags our hero like an old fishwife and substitutes the phrase "Shut up" for any hint of sarcastic wit.
The characters are pretty realistic although Eisenhorn is a bit too "I'm a great hero" for me at times. Abnett works very hard at making his female characters 3-dimensional, but there's still something about Alizabeth Bequin that isn't quite right. Eisenhorn even employs her when she's been consorting with the enemy. She may only have been their concubine, but she's still consorting with them - isn't that how an inquisitor would think?
I think a fundamental mistake was made in assigning Eisenhorn to the Ordo Xenos (this may be something the GW did since Eisenhorn is actually a character from one of their tabletop games). He spends his entire time chasing human heretics and dissidents. When aliens do get in the way, Eisenhorn doesn't try to understand them (beyond the knowledge he needs to kill or capture the humans they are working with); he barely even shows an interest before blowing them away.
Best moments: investigating the corpse in the mortuary near the beginning, with its hidden defence mechanism; the speeder chase through the Imperial Guard festival; following the Imperial Navy battleships into the warped domain of the Saruthi.
Action, humour, scenery, plot: this book has got it all. Fans of the Inquisitor game and 40K alike are going to be in heaven from start to finish. You do need an active knowledge of the Warhammer 40,000 universe to fully understand anything about the story but knowledge of the Inquisitor game is not essential - Abnett hits you over the head with background at any opportunity.
The imagination and attention to detail shown throughout this book easily rivals that of Stephen King or James Herbert. trust me, I read a lot of both.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Dark and moody..., 4 Mar 2004
By 
Isen (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
Inquisitor Eisenhorn of the Ordo Xenos, the key character of the book is an Alien/Heretic Hunter. Assigned to the Ordo Xenos - The Inquisitions anti alien department - he is tasked with searching out human interaction with aliens, searching for aliens themselves or searching for Alien technology and wiping it off the face of the universe. Eisenhorn pulls no punches in his tasks, you resist, you die.
The environment portrayed in the Warhammer 40,000 universe is dark, supressive, moody, Gothic, dangerous, and Corrupt to the core. The stories from this era are themselves violent, dark and moody. Some great characters have emerged and Eisenhorn is one of them.
Searching for Xenos technology Eisenhorns investigations take him all over the universe, culminating in a typical Inquisition response to overwhelming proof of Xenos existance. Even the Inquisition can overstep the mark.....
A very entertaining story and character set. Glorious fight scenes and a genre that will leave you wanting more......its a good job there are more for you to digest. This book is well worth its 5 *s and I'd recommend it to anyone who likes this genre on thier bookshelf.
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5.0 out of 5 stars High Quality Sci-Fi, 22 May 2013
Thirlling and well written book.
The first about the incredible image of Eisenhorn, described so well from this great Writer.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A great start of the Eisenhorn trilogy, 11 Mar 2012
By 
Roy Hall - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Xenos (Eisenhorn Trilogy) (Paperback)
I was new to the warhammer universe and Eisenhorn was a great place to start. The book itself is pretty dark and moody, but not so dark it will depress you while you're reading this ... I liked the main character, Eisenhorn, all his dedication and belief in the justice of his way, the willingness with which he was willing (or accepted) sacrifices in order to achieve his goals and nothing else matters, even the horrendous wounds he sustained in the meantime.

The only thing that is lacking in my opinion is something of Eisenhorn's background. It was pretty clear he was jealous about doing the Emperor's work, it was just not very clear why, what made him value it above anything else. In the book, it was just a given and it took away a little bit of my fun.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Sweeping the galaxy from chaos scum and villainy !!, 3 Aug 2009
By 
Mr. R. Coleman (Marlow, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Xenos (Eisenhorn Trilogy) (Paperback)
Firstly I have to admit that my review of this book takes place some eight years after publication of Xenos, book one in Dan Abnett's Eisenhorn trilogy - it was just one of those Black Library series that had sat on my shelf waiting for me to get Malleus (2nd in the series), which I had been in no particular hurry to find ! And to be honest after reading this novel I wish I had started the series many years before.

Our main character in this book is Inquisitor Gregor Eisenhorn, whose main object in life is hunting out and eliminating of all things Chaotic,alien and generally bad for the Imperial universe of Warhammer 40K, which he does with the ample aid of his quite superbly written collection of close assosiates. I have always felt that Abnett has a great ability to populate his stories with a few interesting and well backgounded characters that you come to really enjoy - though I also have to admit that I find this also to be one of his downsides in-so-much as like his Gaunt series the characters, positions and histories sometimes tend to come thick and fast and leave the poor reader somewhat baffled trying to picture characters they met 50 pages or so before !

Basic story ? Whilst tracking down a previous nemesis and recidivist, Eisenhorn gets embroiled in a plot involving the richest, most powerful and chaos influennced Houses of the local Star System, to trade ancient Xeno artifacts to an alien race for the Necroteuch - an ancient book of chaos origin. Eisenhorn eventually finds himself not only battling human and xeno's alike, but also Chaos Marines and a mysterious unknown character that is haunting his dreams.

The book reads smoothly and I read it in just a few days, which to me in generally the sign of money well worth spent - though I did feel that the proof reader should have been a little more stringent and corrected alot of gramatical errors !

Bad things about this book ? Well as stated, far too numerous characters for my own liking, indeed on many occasions I found myself looking back a few pages to get the description of the character back into my head. I also feel that the stories in Abnetts mind are more colourful and detailed than comes out on the pages of the BL novels. He creates massive amounts of trees, flowers and creatures that have no more detail to them other tham a name - its a little like creating a tree called the Oingo Boingo tree and leaving the reader to just imagine what an Oingo Boingo tree looks like and where it might have come from. But, if he did give the depth - which he does usually on character - then the book would probably be too heavy to life without the aid of a servitor !

Lastly I would say that I feel Abnett is to the Black Library and the Warhammer universe what Stephen King is to horror - I just can't imagine it without him ! However, I would also say that unlike a lot of BL books that can be read by anyone who does not have atleast a brief knowledge of the workings of the genre, this one really would need a little understanding of the way of life in the 40K universe.

Still, I will start on Malleus now with all due haste - even if it means returning to Xeno's for reference if I need a reminder on anything ! 5 out of 5.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Pretty ok for a typical sci-fi style fiction novel, 28 Feb 2008
By 
L. Green "Feltano" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Xenos (Eisenhorn Trilogy) (Paperback)
Barcode: 9781841541464

I say typical, but of course it isn't. For about 4 years i was massive fan of Games Workshop games and i got this book to read over the summer. Looking back now, it was surprising good. Warhammer 40,000 is one of the most imaginative sci-fi worlds ever and even though i don't play anymore, i still admire the world and it's workings.

When i say typical, i mean the style of writing has that same slightly cheap, stereotypical feel that a large amount of fantasy/sci-fi novels have. That said, this book, the first in a series is the story of an Inquisitor, in simplest terms, a kind of James Bond of the future. Although i struggle to remember the exact details of the plot, the book was quite a pleasant read. I've never read any other Black Library novels so for those looking to try their first one i guess this is as good a place to start as any.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fast paced thrilling and utterly dark, 11 Sep 2001
This review is from: Xenos (Eisenhorn Trilogy) (Paperback)
This is the first of the Xenos trilogy in which you follow Inquisitor Eisenhorn on a fast paced journey through the known galaxy and into the unknown. From start to beginning I was hooked and even when the story slowed down to explain some finer points of it's history action and thrill lay around the corner. I greatly anticipate the next of these novels as this one really caught my interest.
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Xenos (Eisenhorn Trilogy)
Xenos (Eisenhorn Trilogy) by Dan Abnett (Paperback - 28 Jun 2001)
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