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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not a trilogy people!
Oh... My...
I thought it was a Trilogy and was getting towards the end of this book thinking 'wow - they have a lot of plot to wrap up here and not many pages to do it in'... Now I have to wait for the next installment. I'm torn between loving that this isn't the end and hating that I don't know what's going to happen for another couple of years!

There's a...
Published 9 months ago by Hollie

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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The weakest of the series so far
I don't think that this book is anywhere close to the quality of the first two.

Weeks has previously written crisply and engagingly, drawing the reader along at a brisk pace. In this book, however, it appears that he's decided to try out some new ideas and new styles, and they simply don't work. There are chapters interspersed in the books which simply destroy...
Published 8 months ago by Dave


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not a trilogy people!, 11 Sept. 2014
Oh... My...
I thought it was a Trilogy and was getting towards the end of this book thinking 'wow - they have a lot of plot to wrap up here and not many pages to do it in'... Now I have to wait for the next installment. I'm torn between loving that this isn't the end and hating that I don't know what's going to happen for another couple of years!

There's a lot of plot development that goes on here. I think it's totally worth the time and feel much more connected to the characters (and the expanded world and cast) now, but I can see how some people might think it a lot slower than books one and two.

My one issue with this book is (without giving too much away) the scenes like that with Kip and the 'Library' towards the end. I know it's kind of ridiculous to say about a fantasy book that's built on the unbelievable, but these scenes were... well... unbelievable! I get sucked into books and build up limits of their 'world' in my mind. These limits are extrapolated from my understanding of the text, and I find it quite uncomfortable when the author steps outside my so-called understanding of the rules. It makes me feel something akin to reading a historical text about WWII for example, and finding a passage on Brent Weeks' Drafting stuffed in there! Obviously it's up to the individual reader to determine for themselves whether they think that these elements fit, but for me it was a step too far.

Saying that, this is a fab book and I can't wait for the next installment!
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The weakest of the series so far, 15 Oct. 2014
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I don't think that this book is anywhere close to the quality of the first two.

Weeks has previously written crisply and engagingly, drawing the reader along at a brisk pace. In this book, however, it appears that he's decided to try out some new ideas and new styles, and they simply don't work. There are chapters interspersed in the books which simply destroy any momentum and offer little in the way of reason for their presence.

The book is unremittingly bleak, which is not a fault in and of itself. However, the bleakness in the plot seems to have tainted Weeks' relationship with his characters. It's almost as though he now despises them, in particular Kip who he seems to take delight in abusing.

Yes. We get that Kip has body image issues, but an incessant focus on his BMI doesn't make for interesting reading.

What I find deeply frustrating is that there are still passages of Week's trademark writing: dynamic prose with the perfect amount of texture to make the world and the characters interesting and engaging. It's just dragged down by the burden of the much weaker sections.

Some sharper editing (and self-editing), and a return to the style of the previous books, and this could become an epic series.

More of this style, though, and it looks as doomed as the characters that Weeks portrays.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars What a shame, could have been as brilliant as his previous books if he stuck to the trilogy format and cut out the waffle., 29 Sept. 2014
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Really enjoyed the first 2 books of this series (not trilogy). I found this depressing. The book started good, as usual. but then something seemed to change and I reread a page or two to make sure I hadn't missed something. It became unendingly bleak with pages of prose that seemed irrelevant to the story line. (Maybe another 2 books along they may have some reason but I will not be there to find out). A book looses its appeal when i know everything that can go wrong will and there is no let up. Kip remained the only chapters that were worth reading (and maybe Gavin). I only carried on reading because I thought it was a trilogy and having got so far wanted the threads pulling together. Some hope.
It reminded me of 'The Game of Thrones' that started out well but became unenjoyable for me. Maybe I am a lightweight but I like to read a book because I enjoy it not to be led by the nose from one disaster to the next.
Brent Weeks, we know you can write well. Conclude this quickly and turn your talents to a new series. Don't hang on in there, you're not good enough.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Generally a disappointment and not the same calibre as the previous two ..., 14 Oct. 2014
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Generally a disappointment and not the same calibre as the previous two books. I'm not sure I'll be continuing with this series.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars lightbringer, 25 Sept. 2014
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What could have been an exciting follow up to the previous books was a massive let down. Parts of the book were repetitive, much was irrelevant and the whole plot could have been told in a third of the time. Disappointing and you will probably have to wait two years for the next instalment.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars this was a good story but has been dragged out way too long, 27 Nov. 2014
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this was a good story but has been dragged out way too long. Not only could each book have lost a hundred pages without the story losing anything but to drag it out past a trilogy--- poor writing, poor editing greedy publishing? take your pick but as a reader dissapointing
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Hugely Disappointed, 2 Sept. 2014
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I'm a fan of the author having enjoyed the Night Angel trilogy and the first books in this series, but not this latest installment. The problems I had with this book are many but the main one being the lack of plot progress over such a lengthy book. Other reviewers have stated it is fast paced but I found it anything but.

The war with the Colour Prince is going on but we find out little to nothing about it or the character of the enemy leader. Too much time spent by Kip and friends researching in libraries for my liking and far too frequently I had to refer to the ever expanding glossary to try to decipher what and whom they were referring to in their conversations.

In the first books I found myself warming to Kip and Gavin but by the end of this book that connection had been lost for various reasons to the point of not caring about their fate.

I have the feeling this series is going to keep expanding in the way that the 'Wheel of Time' series did, My advice would be to wait until the series is finished before continuing. I won't be reading more until then, maybe not at all unless reviews suggest the failings I have noted in this book have been addressed.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good But Not Great, 20 Sept. 2014
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Mr. G. Patmore (England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Broken Eye: Book 3 of Lightbringer (Hardcover)
The Broken Eye. A part of me considers this 'The Broken Dream'.
When I read 'The Black Prism' I was blown away. Fresh characters, an engaging world, and a thrilling - if sometimes convoluted - magic system. Queue 'The Blinding Knife', and not only was my mind further blown, but terrified. The characters visibly developed, and the new ones that emerged were rounded and intense. Things changed drastically, the stakes increased, and plots thickened. I spoke to a friend of mine after I'd lent (more like attacked) her with the second book, and told her I was so scared. That if we were only two books in, I dreaded to think how good the third would be.

I hate to waffle on, but this is how passionately I feel about these books.

And then came the... well, not disappointment, per se, because this book was by no means bad, or poorly written, but it had several glaring flaws in its aspect that I couldn't help but notice from page one. I won't go too much into detail, because not only would it be nit-picking but it might spoil the plot for others, so I will sum up in short my issues with 'The Broken Eye'.

In terms of pacing, it dragged. For such a large book a lot of its content is spent milling around the Chromeria, and the deck of a ship. Seven Satrapies, and we only see about two of them in this book. Weeks has written on his website, on the writing advice section, that to make a story interesting imagine a character in a situation, and how it could get worse, and then make it worse. He does this... all the time. Just when you were getting bored of the tension, he adds more tension, which, to me, added more boredom.
Gavin's plot drags, I think, because he is such a key figure that he needs more focus than Weeks' plans for him allowed. What I mean to say is that the author had a timeline of 'when' something would happen to Gavin, so he had to fill in those gaps when he didn't with a lot of things that didn't have any impact. Karris gains a new role, but doesn't achieve anything with it beyond self-doubt, falling into her old role as a Blackguard etc - right up until the very end.
In fact, kip's story is the only one that gives anything to the overall story in large and consistent quantities, through character development, insight into Andross Guile, and in developing the story overall in a big, big way.

One of the things that really interested me about 'The Blinding Knife' was Aliviana Danavis's POV, though which we saw the Color Prince. I think I can count on a hand that has been mangled how many scenes she has in this entire, 750-page-odd monstrosity, and even those have nothing to do with the Color Prince. We hear of his actions, battles he's fought etc, but I don't think she shares a single scene with him, and therefore we lose the perspective of the other side for a whole book. Disappointing.

Weeks has always been clever, there's no denying it. He has character stories, developments, and reveals all over the shop, and the big ones have always surprised me in their complexity as well as their daring. However, In 'The Broken Eye', Weeks seems to feel that he has to top himself, and what ensues is confusing at best. I used to love the way Gavin Guile would smart-talk his way out of situations, but the ways he was going about it made no sense, sometimes, not just his actions but the way Weeks would write his dialogue. And the massive reveal and plot advancement that Kip goes through is so vague and shrouded in images with no explanations... I think he tries too hard to be subtle, but by saying: 'I'm so smart that only I will know what's going on, and only the cleverest of readers will even come close to guessing right' he comes off as pretentious, rather than genius.

Weeks spends so much time trying to show how smart he is that he stop trying to be enjoyable. I read this book to be entertained at the end of the day, but, mostly, I wasn't. His narrative is still great, and Kip greatly redeemed this book. If it had been solely his show, with some cutting of the BS, then it would have been a great book, but as it was, it was merely good. I can only hope that Brent Weeks actually moves the story forward in the next book, and that things actually happen.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Oh Dear Mr Weeks!, 14 Oct. 2014
This review is from: The Broken Eye: Book 3 of Lightbringer (Hardcover)
i couldn't wait to finish this one by Mr Weeks. Really I just couldn't wait to be done with it! Shame.

Weeks is a brilliant writer as evidenced by the superb and polished performance of Books 1 and 2 which I absolutely loved. Here in The Broken Eye I'm sorry to say that he has merely indulged in that age old ploy of writers that is known in literary circles as Pulling My Plonker... and this book really is the writer indulging himself. It is overwritten, could be cut by 200 pages, and merely leads us from one crisis to another until I began to lose interest in the fate of the characters. Gavin/Dazen lurches from one piece of nonsense to another, his opponents are allowed all sorts of melodramatic dialogue, all that to deliver G/D to the the original cell of Book 1. Oh dear Mr Weeks.
The Teia sequences are quite well constructed with the clever use of Mr Murder but again much of this could have been cut down. The best parts of the novel involve Kip and the way his personality and fate are unfolding so that is good news.
I don't know if I can go through another few books of this if such is the writer's/publishers' design. I've already had enough of this with Peter Brett. Come on Mr Weeks get your undoubtedly immensely talented act together.
And now I can't wait to finish this review.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Next please!, 10 Sept. 2014
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He can't write them quickly enough! It takes forever (she giggles impishly) to get the next instalment an then there is a very short period of a bliss which ends in utter frustration when you start rationing last chapter as you don't want the book to be over yet. Please sir can I have some more!?
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The Broken Eye: Book 3 of Lightbringer
The Broken Eye: Book 3 of Lightbringer by Brent Weeks (Hardcover - 26 Aug. 2014)
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