Customer Reviews


175 Reviews
5 star:
 (115)
4 star:
 (38)
3 star:
 (9)
2 star:
 (8)
1 star:
 (5)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


101 of 107 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The last battle, part 1
After twelve books of slow-moving, intricate plotting (and a hefty dose of filler), the Last Battle against the Dark One is here.

So is "Towers of Midnight" good? Oh yeah. Brandon Sanderson and the late Robert Jordan came up with a solid penultimate volume, sprinkled with solid characterization, epic moments, and the occasional discovery that will probably have...
Published on 3 Nov 2010 by E. A Solinas

versus
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good, but could have done with some better editing
I have been following the wheel of time since I picked up book 1 as a teenager. Overall I quite like Brandon's writing. He captures the spirit of Jordan's legacy and had made a very good stab at finishing Jordan's Epic.

The threads of the storylines are all neatly coming together and are being tied off nicely and I'm not going to put in spoilers to say...
Published on 20 Feb 2011 by Patrick


‹ Previous | 1 2 318 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Back to the future, 25 Mar 2011
I suspect like most people who read the Wheel of Time, I became a bit bored with the 'middle' of the series after such a terrific first few books. The tradgedy of Robert Jordans death left me wondering how it was going to end, if I had the stamina to continue. But I have to say that the new author has really breathed life into the series. This is the first WoT book that I have enjoyed reading for a long time. It's alomost a shame to get the end, as it seems as well written as the beginning!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Terrific read, 30 Mar 2013
Robert Jordans wife must be very astute to have picked Brandon Sanderson to continue this epic as the transition is almost seamless. A terrific read, exciting and almost impossible to
put down. Leaving you wanting more.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars WOW, DOES STUFF HAPPEN., 20 Jan 2013
By 
You can definitely tell the end is drawing near! While I complained about Perrin's few chapters in "The Gathering Storm", rest assured he gets to do something proper this time around, instead of just moping around brooding over what to do now that he no longer has to rescue his wife from the Shaido.

In fact, a lot of the plot revolves around him this time, and while Galad was missing from the previous novel as well, he's back in this one. And turns out to not be a stuck-up brat after all. He also gets to meet his not-dead stepmum, and we can only hope the same goes for Gawyn before Tarmon Gai'don kicks off properly.

Speaking of Gawyn, he's having issues getting Egwene to bond him. Meanwhile, assassins are trying to kill Egwene, but she can manage them perfectly well on her own, thank you. She also doesn't like the visit she has from Rand, and what Rand is intending to do.

Rand is busy being the Messiah, now that he's done with the "very naughty boy" phase, so things could actually turn out well for the world in the end. I hope.

Things are starting to brew over at the Black Tower as well. Perhaps Mazrim Taim isn't such a great man to put in charge, after all ... But at least the White Tower is united again, and that's something I'm more interested in reading about anyway.

Elayne is back again, still pregnant, and makes a deal with Mat about the cannons - sorry, "dragons" - Aludra wants the bellfounders to make. I'm beginning to think I don't care much for Elayne, to be perfectly honest. Mat, on the other hand, finally manages to get to the Tower of Ghenjei, but what happens, you may Read And Find Out.

If you've been comparing the Wheel of Time books to Norse mythology and wonder when a) Thor is going to get himself a proper hammer, and b) Odin is going to lose an eye, this is it.

Some silly names aside, there really is nothing to complain about. The pacing is quicker than normal, the chapters at least appear to be shorter (thanks, Sanderson!), which makes it easier for everyone who tends to say "I'll just finish the chapter" in bed at night. Some chapters previously in the series have been very, very long. Not so here, so that's great.

I've only mentioned a few things here, but there are a lot of very momentous things happening in this novel, that sets up the final novel beautifully. Maybe the Whitecloaks won't be an issue after all, who knows? Are the darkfriends falling apart from the inside? Can the Final Battle actually possibly be won by the Dragon and the forces of good? Read And Find Out.

Towers of Midnight perhaps isn't epic, but the series is, and this penultimate instalment is a fitting near-ending. Well-written, eventful, exciting, amazing ... So, so good.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Moving towards a promising conclusion, 17 Jan 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Towers Of Midnight: Book 13 of the Wheel of Time (Paperback)
Finally there is an injection of pace into the saga again. Despite the brilliance of the first half a dozen books the latter half of the series has felt like it has been treading water for a long time. With the penultimate book the story seems to come together just in time for the finale. Whether this is anything to do with Brandon Saunderson or whether Robert Jordan already had things laid out to go this way doesn't really matter. What is relevant is that between them, and Jordan's widow, it seems like the saga is back on track to deliver a great conclusion.

It is obviously tricky to say much about this book without giving away spoilers. But it seems safe to say that it concentrates more around the activities of Perrin and Mat and those that surround them. Rand continues his strategies but his appearances are brief and clearly not yet the focus. Elayne, Egwene and Nynaeve get a fair share of the book and some Aes Sedai issues become resolved. Gawain and Galad are also featured heavily, more than they ever have been before. There is also some focus on Aviendha but I was left feeling uncertain about what was going on in her sections. There doesn't seem to be much of a need for them and I wonder if in some way they are to do with Jordan's proposed trilogy focussing on the Seanchan; which will now never be written.

Disappointingly there isn't much action from the Forsaken. Out of the few that remain some of them have still hardly been featured. Moridin still does very little, his appearances brief. But he and some of the other leading villains loom in the background hopefully ready to take on a more major role.

There is still an awful lot of seemingly unnecessary arguing between the various heroes of the saga and the undercurrent of latent sexism continues. I'm finding it a little annoying and textually repetitive that all the male characters think all women behave in a certain way and vice versa. It is particularly annoying with the Aes Sedai at times. After all the events across the series of books I would have expected at least some of the characters to have grown out of this. Surely all their horizons have been broadened by their experiences.

The above aside, this is a very enjoyable read and it is probably a better book than the previous five or six in the series. It's a promising sign that the final book might equal the greatness of the first few.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The End is Nigh, 9 Jan 2013
By 
Jrc Salter "jrcsalter" (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Now, there are a few problems with this book and I wasn't sure whether I should detract a star because of it, but by the end I thought it should deserve the full five.

This book concentrates more on Perrin, Mat and Elayne than the previous book did and for the most part all their stories are brilliant. It takes time to get there, but the destination is worth the wait.

Perrin

It is widely known that these last three books were originally meant to be one. In the Gathering Storm, it wasn't obvious and Sanderson had done a good job of choosing certain story lines to elevate over others. Perrin's wasn't one of them, so his story has been placed in this book. However, because of this we now have quite a huge continuity error. The first half of Perrin's story takes place during the events of the previous book and as such, certain things that you believe have already happened...haven't. It's like a huge flashback, which i wouldn't mind, but it's not styled like one. Again, I wouldn't mind if there were no crossovers, but the character of Tam al'Thor appears in both Perrin's story and Rand's story which is a continuation of the previous book. So you're reading along one minute about how he's gone back to the Two Rivers, and the next minute find him speaking to Perrin! In Ghealdan! While I would think anybody would be stupid to pick this book up first as it is clearly marked as book thirteen, I would think a new reader would get confused over this (though, to be honest, it's probably their fault anyway. I mean who reads book thirteen before even book one!). It could even get confusing if you hadn't read the Gathering Storm in a while. Fortunately these matters are put into perspective when we find out that Perrin witnessed Rand's activities on Dragonmount.

These niggles aside, Perrin's story is by far the best it's been since Shadow Rising, perhaps ever. He has to confront much of his past with the Whitecloaks, Slayer, the Wolves, all the while preparing his armies for the Last Battle and finally accepting the role of Lord.

Elayne

The weak point of the novel. After gaining the Lion Throne, Elayne now has her sights set on Cairhien. So we have to go though yet another fight for the crown. Fortunately, this portion of the story is relatively short.

Mat

Aside from the ending, this is the best part of the book. Mat, Thom, and Noal set off for the Tower of Ghenjei. Once there the climax with the Aelfinn and the Eelfinn is exciting and quite creepily terrifying. The creatures were creepy in Shadow Rising, but here we see them really come to life.

The overall climax to the book is something that we've been waiting for since the Eye of the World. Throughout the book, we've got huge exciting battles with shadowspawn, but they're mere skirmishes compared to witnessing the start of the actual Tarmon Gaidon. However, that's not what I like about the ending, it's the less action oriented things. The fact that we get to see the armies of at least eight nations rallying together. A short and terrifying dream sequence that shows just how evil the Dark One can be. But my favourite has to be the end quote. It all leads to a feeling of dread and despair, leaving you truly scared for the Last Battle. This is a point few writers can accomplish. Most will have this kind of scene with a feeling of hope, epic potential, or just plain action, but not one of impending doom. This book scared me. But not because of the monsters, or the concept, or even the Dark One himself. I was scared for the characters. I was scared for Rand, Mat, Perrin, Faile, Elayne, Min, Aviendha, Egwene, Lan, Nyneave, Thom, Everyone. I have read this series on and off for the past ten years and I have grown to know and love these characters. The moment they have dreaded throughout thirteen books has finally come. And I am terrified they're not going to make it.

That is writing you don't read every day.

This is a truly epic book. In every sense of the word and I am looking forward to starting Memory of Light tomorrow. I'll probably end up in Waterstones and begin reading it knowing that it has already been delivered to my house while I was at work. Damn you Amazon! Get this stuff to me quickly! I'm sure you can get someone to open a Gateway instead of bothering with those pesky slow lorries!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Too obviously not Robert Jordan, 10 Oct 2012
By 
Paul (Worcestershire) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Towers Of Midnight: Book 13 of the Wheel of Time (Paperback)
The opening of every other Wheel of Time volume has drawn me into the story; this one did not. This time, the author going through the current situation of the main characters was dreary, and I was past the 10% mark before the book developed any interest for me. I'll probably buy the final volume, because I've too much of my own time and money invested in this series, but if this had been the first book, I wouldn't have bought the second. The use of language is not the same as the previous volumes, for example, 'breastplates' are frequently mentioned, as if they were worn without backplates, and I was actually surprised the only time that the word 'cuirasses' appeared: I didn't think the author knew it. Brandon Sanderson is, regrettably, no Robert Jordan.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb and Whets the Appetitie for Book 14, 20 Sep 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I was sceptical about Robert Jordan's books being finished off by someone else, but after the decent "Gathering Storm" Brandon Sanderson has really hit his stride here.

I will try and avoid giving spoilers, but a lot of the more tediously dragged out plot aspects are resolved here in a very satisfying manner. Galad and Gawyn both finally get roles beyond a few pages in the prologue and move beyond the two dimensional background characters they'd been relegated to.

The story does an excellent job of setting the scene for the last battle, and Sanderson manages to start pulling together the multiple strands of the story and aims them firmly towards the conclusion.

My only minor criticisms are that Tuon barely gets a look-in, featuring in all of about 5 pages and Mat's story is a little dragged out and then rushed at the end. He spends an inordinate amount of time sitting around in Caemlyn doing nothing when all you want him to do is get off to the Tower of Ghenjei.

All in all though, this is a gripping and satisfying read. Writing in September 2012, January for book 14 seems a very long time away - almost as long and painful as Crossroads of Twilight!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fabulously written and a worthy testament to the original Author, 1 Feb 2011
I was originally sceptical of Mr Sanderson's attempt to finish the Wheel of Time. Notwithstanding the hype, I thought he would not be able to follow Mr Jordan's threads and keep to the true story. I was wrong. He has done better than I could have hoped. Book 13 is fast paced, thrilling and ties up a lot of loose threads that I was sure would remain hanging. He's really got the feel from the original author's epic and has, if anything, improved on the style, if that's possible.

I'll be watching closely for the 14th and final book. It'll be a masterpiece, if this one is anything to measure it by. Definitely worth the effort.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Just wonderful, 14 Jan 2011
The series started brilliantly and then had a bit of a dip, the last few books have taken them to a whole new level. The writing style from Brandon is fabulous and I am thankful he was chosen to take on Robert Jordans work. I finished the book last night, it was like saying goodbye to an old friend as I loved taking some time out and entering the world Robert created. It has been worth it on so many levels and I am really looking forward to the last of the series. I'm also hoping that it's not the end of the world we love too with maybe further books and stories to capture our attention.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars To Shayol Ghul, 28 Nov 2010
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Well I've been hooked on this series and stuck with it when Jordan was deviating massively from book 7 onwards.

There is probably more Sanderson in this than Jordan in this book compared to TGS. And in the early chapters it shows quite badly.

Still, I'm probably biased so I've given it 4 stars.

Potential spoilers so look away now:

Rand finds inner peace and commands everyone to ready their armies to go to Shayol Ghul, they start lining up in the last chapter
Egwene goes head to head with Mesana, and deals with Gawyn and the Hall
Elayne is still annoying
Nynaeve takes the test of a hundred weaves
Perrin battles slayer in the wolf dream, and faces the whitecloaks
Mat and Thom go to the Towers of Ghenjei
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 318 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Towers Of Midnight: Book 13 of the Wheel of Time
Towers Of Midnight: Book 13 of the Wheel of Time by Brandon Sanderson (Paperback - 6 Oct 2011)
9.29
Not in stock; order now and we'll deliver when available
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews