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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Painfully good!
How it is possible for Tad Williams to have written so many books is a riddle to me, since those I have read are masterpieces! Usually, writers seem to strike gold once only.
The advancing on the Green Angel Tower is slow, deliberate and very dangerous and it's very very exciting.
I often forgot myself and was lost for hours in the book, both wanting to read...
Published on 9 Jun. 2005 by B. Jonsson

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Creative in spots, but rather tedious. Cardboard characters.
I picked up the books in this series not expecting a profound experience but simply an enjoyable adventure. The story is good and parts are quite creative, although it borrows heavily from Tolkien (Elves are called Sithi, Hobbits are Trolls, the Sithi are immortals who are dying out and came from a faraway land, lots of Tolkien here.) I think the series would have...
Published on 2 Mar. 1998


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Painfully good!, 9 Jun. 2005
By 
B. Jonsson "Literate Warlock" (falun, dalarna sweden) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
How it is possible for Tad Williams to have written so many books is a riddle to me, since those I have read are masterpieces! Usually, writers seem to strike gold once only.
The advancing on the Green Angel Tower is slow, deliberate and very dangerous and it's very very exciting.
I often forgot myself and was lost for hours in the book, both wanting to read more and not wanting it to end.
I have read a good many series of different kinds, but never was I more eager to get hold of the sequel!
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book, full of battles and adventures!, 15 Dec. 2000
By A Customer
To Green Angel Tower: Siege is the third volume in Memory, Sorrow and Thorn (started with The Dragonbone Chair and The Stone of Farewell, and ending with To Green Angel Tower: Storm).
After meeting with Josua's party and exiles from the plains on Sesuad'ra, the Stone of Farewell, Simon is knighted by the prince for having recovered the legendary sword Thorn. But soon they learn that Josua's brother, the High-King Elias, has sent an army led by Duke Fengbald.
They have to prepare for a desperate war. With a makeshift army of exiles, and even with the unexpected help from the trolls, they know they'll be greatlty outnumbered.
To the south, Princess Miriamele, pretending she's daughter of a minor nobleman, has unwillingly given in to Lord Apsitis. He soon tells her he knows her true identity and plans to marry her, for political purposes. She'll have to escape.
In this book, Tad Williams manages to keep us reading avidly without revealing too much of the final plot, digging deeper into each character's personality, making them seem so real. I just can't wait to read the next and last one!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Creative in spots, but rather tedious. Cardboard characters., 2 Mar. 1998
By A Customer
I picked up the books in this series not expecting a profound experience but simply an enjoyable adventure. The story is good and parts are quite creative, although it borrows heavily from Tolkien (Elves are called Sithi, Hobbits are Trolls, the Sithi are immortals who are dying out and came from a faraway land, lots of Tolkien here.) I think the series would have benefitted from a lot of editing - Williams drags on far too long with many scenes. There characters are rather shallow and sometimes hard to believe. One moment they're intelligent, the next they miss the obvious. I became rather tired of them bursting into tears every ten pages. Nearly every character would freeze in terror when some danger faced them. These would all be fine, but when Williams uses the same reaction for every character and repeats it ad naseum, one grows a little tired of it. One of the other reviews here thought that the best thing about the book was that the depictions of the characters on the covers matched their descriptions in the book. Heh. If it's covers that are important to you, enjoy! Otherwise, spend your time and money on other books. There are many better ones than this.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A magnificent conclusion to a magnificent story, 7 Jan. 2007
Alas! So the story does have to end! But oh, does it end beautifully! To Green Angel Tower (divided in 2 parts, Siege and Storm) is quite simply magnificent. With 1500+ pages (paperback) between the two books, you could say Tad Williams knows how to build up his ending. I won't divulge anything about the plot as it must be read, but I will say this: this book has one of the most wonderfully crafted, climactic ending I have ever read. The build up is long, fascinating, and all subjects which one would consider important in the story is dealt with. There are only one or two little things which are left open ended, and might suggest that Tad might even grace his readers another tale of Osten Ard one day. To those who read Dragonbone Chair and Stone of Farewell and are hesitating to purchase the rest (though I don't see how that could be possible), do not trouble your mind any longer! To Green Angel Tower is a majestic ending to a majestic epic. Thank you, Tad Williams, the first trip to Osten Ard was as unforgettable as the first trip to Middle Earth.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great example of 'Trad' fantasy, 15 Aug. 2009
Do you like Traditional Fantasy? You want a gawky spotty teenager who will become a hero and save his world?, do you want exotic and mysterious elves riding reluctantly to the aid of mankind? Heroic seiges? epic journey's?, daring rescues?, Magic swords?
Then this is definately for you!

I found this the third (and penultimate) installment of Memory, Sorrow and Thorn the best so far. If you are coming to Fantasy late and have only read LOTR and want something of a similar nature before you become a little cynical and desire a darker tale, then this series is an excellent choice. Or if like me you have read a lot of the darker side of modern fantasy like Abercrombie, Lynch, Erikson etc and fancy basking back in warmer waters, this kind of feels like a welcome homecoming.
Yes I will leave for more 'dangerous' shores again soon, but I am very much enjoying my time in Tad Williams world and feel this is an important stop in my quest for routing out the 'classics' I missed first time round.

This the third novel leaves us a huge amount of unanswered questions. What is Camaris so ashamed of? What exactly is the nature of Elias and the Storm Kings agreement? What has Miriamele remembered that makes it vital for her want to race off on her own again? Just what is Pyrates up to?
Who were Simons parents?, what is the connection between Camaris and the Elves? will Binibik ever stop talking backwards and will poor Simon ever lose his virginity?

In fact I am guessing this was probably penned as a trilogy and over shot it's landing, as the ending of this book didn't feel a particularly natural place to pause. However all the more exciting for that and after a little break for diet variety I, as Arnie once said, 'will be back!'
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5.0 out of 5 stars Tad Williams: A decidedly brilliant writer, 21 Aug. 1997
By A Customer
The first thing I would like to say about this series, something which I almost couldn't believe I had found on the science fiction/fantasy bookshelves (especially after the shock I took with the Robert Jordan books) is that . . . and this is really quite amazing . . . the characters on the COVER of the book looked *exactly* like their DESCRIPTIONS *IN* the book! Besides this amazing feat, what struck me most about the whole series was the development of the main character. Williams succeeds wonderfully in absorbing the reader in his realistic depiction of Simon's growth from a clumsy, dream-filled boy to a clumsy, love-struck adolescent to a slightly more mature (but still clumsy) young man. Also, he masterfully transforms the tired old formula of disguising the standard fantasy races by giving them a different name. He imbues these characters with such incredible detail that you barely notice the gimick. Altogether a great read, worth the hours it takes to get through the dictionary-sized tomes.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why can't there be 6 Stars set side for this book?, 29 July 1999
By A Customer
When I first started the series, I was slightly bored with it, but a lot of the more enticing novel series are like that....I recieved "The Dragonbone Chair" as a gift for my 16th birthday and as soon as I finished it, I read it again. I did the same after buying "Stone of Farewell" and "To Green Angel Tower". Tad Williams has a way with words that ranks him as one of the greatest Fantasy writers of all time. Thank you Tad!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Enthralling!!!, 11 Feb. 1999
By A Customer
This series is a true epic which will go down in memory as one of the finest yarns to ever grace the pages of fantasy. William's undaunted prose and fully realized characters mix to create a tale that will make you cheer. Williams takes that classic fantasy beginning of a young boy and his trials and tribulations on his way to greatness and he adds a new twist that the fantasy genre has not seen in years: HE DOES IT RIGHT. The story is great, the setting realistic, the characters palpable, and most improtant of all for legitimate fantasy readers, the magic is realistic and believable. This is one tale that you will not want to miss, and the entire series is done being written and in paperback print. Williams is one of this age's finest fantasy authors and deserves the praise to be mentioned along with other greats such as David Feintuch and George R.R. Martin. Bravo!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing, 9 Sept. 2013
By 
Andix (Greater Manchester) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Siege: Memory, Sorrow and Thorne Series: Book Three (Memory, Sorrow & Thorn) (Paperback)
I adore Tad Williams writings, the stories are gripping and pull you in. You can visualise the characters, the castles and the countries. Your there; if you let your imagination be taken hold of. The ShadowMarch series is epic and I have enjoyed reading this time and time again. I can imagine that I will exact as much pleasure in reading and getting lost in this series just as much. If you like fantasy then these are a must. I only discovered my love for this type of writing a short time ago, it will continue as long as I can find books as exciting.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars For the daydreamers but still pretty good, 25 Feb. 1999
By A Customer
I read this book and I had absolutely no criticism of it. Now reading other people's comments I realise that you either love or hate this book. If you liked Tolkien but with some variety and an interesting plot, then read on. The storyline is complex and quite clever, and his realistic view of his world is true to form. This is essentially more of a love story than a true fantasy epic as there's a lot in relationships and emotions involved than the usual powerful honour and courage than you would find in most other fantasy books. This is where Williams's strength lies. His accurate telling of events is sublime if you can concentrate on storyline only, but his concentration towards the main character, Simon, might make you turn pages where other characters are involved to read more about him. Slightly dubious in his character, Tiamak, as his role is small, but chapters are devoted to him. But overall, he's made a classic fantasy tale that's different and more realistic than most. Seriously good.
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