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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb ending to the series, 16 Dec 2011
This review is from: The Kingdom Of Gods (Paperback)
WOW was my primary reaction to this concluding volume of the Inheritance trilogy. The Kingdom of Gods is an amazing story once again. As I said in my review of The Broken Kingdoms, Ms Jemisin has a distinct voice in oodles and spades and this is reaffirmed by The Kingdom of Gods. But what is even more striking is that while she has a distinct voice, each of the three books has a distinct voice as well. Sieh sounds as I expected Sieh would, based on the prior books. The distinction between the three books is emphasised by my reading the last two, The Broken Kingdoms and The Kingdom of Gods, so close together. The books are a cohesive whole, when taken as a trilogy, while at the same time they're all strong standalone narratives. It's a rare series that achieves that.

I loved Sieh's story. Set decades after the events in The Broken Kingdoms, society has changed even more. Life has become more secular and nations chafe under Arameri rein. The large narrative scale is world changing, with client states rebelling and religion changing and becoming less dominant, but small scale the book a story about trust. Sieh learning to trust the Arameri twins Shahar and Dekarta and the twins trusting him, Sieh needing to trust his fellow godlings and his parents, and of course Yeine and Nahadoth trusting Itempas. I love that trust is shown as sometimes implicit, sometimes needing to be earned, as something that can be broken and lost, but also regained. Sieh's journey in this regard was the most central and maybe the most far-reaching of the novel. Sieh's development throughout the novel was fantastic, but it is hard to detail why it is so without giving spoilers. Shahar goes through a similar magnitude of growth. She struggles to break the Arameri mould, to not be a tyrant, to do what is right. And she largely succeeds, barring some mistakes along the way. I loved the relationship between Sieh and Shahar; it's so deliciously complicated and conflicting and doesn't go where you'd expect it to. Dekarta actually ends up taking a smaller role over much of the novel than I expected, though his re-emergence into the narrative and his eventual role in events was brilliant. One character that really touched me, surprisingly, was Remath, who tries so hard to protect and save her children and struggles not to show her love, to be a true Arameri. To me she was a tragic figure, so proud and strong and the opposite yet so like her daughter.

The political turmoil affecting the Hundred Thousand Kingdoms is handled amazingly as well, shown by the maskers' magic and the different countries we see through Sieh's eyes, especially Darre and the Teman people. There is a lot of hatred, mistrust and old grudges against the Arameri and these - emphasised by Sieh's recollections of what the Arameri made him do when they had him enslaved - make liking the Arameri difficult. At the same time it is hard not to like Shahar and Deka, as they're compelling, and more importantly very human, characters. However great the turmoil though, in the end mortalkind draws together when facing an even bigger threat of total annihilation and I really liked the eventual solution to the 'Arameri problem', which was both elegant and very well done.

Sieh is a trickster and when he opens with "There will be no tricks in this tale." the reader shouldn't believe him. Nothing is as it seems and the ending is superb. The Kingdom of Gods is a worthy conclusion to one of the best trilogies I've had the pleasure of reading in recent years. If you've not tried any of Ms Jemisin's work before, you really should. Start with The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms, or if you don't want to take the full-length leap and would rather dip your toe into something short form, why not check out some of her short fiction listed on her blog. Both L'Alchemista and The Narcomancer are good places to start. For myself, I can't wait until her next series, the Dreamblood duology, is released, starting with The Killing Moon in May!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Cracking title, 10 Oct 2011
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Gareth Wilson - Falcata Times Blog "Falcata T... - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
The third title in NK Jemisin's Inheritance Trilogy and one that along with the others, really won't let you sit comfortably and has been a long wait for fans. As with the previous two it has great characters, decent plot line and of course new and novel ways to do things from magic through to the interaction between deities and their followers in this no holds barred fast action title that demonstrates that NK is an author to watch.

Add to this some great twists, a real sense of not only accomplishment but also of joy at the developments and the reader is given not only a seriously decent read but one that will stay with them for quite some time as future titles will be judged against the skills presented within. For me, this has been a real breakthrough and a pure joy although that has to be tempered with the regret that this, for now, is the final journey into NK's mind for a while.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Good ending to the series, 28 Jun 2014
This review is from: The Kingdom Of Gods (Paperback)
This book is a good ending to the series. It tied up loose ends quite nicely, without leaving things to bug you and wonder over.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great ending to the series, 18 Feb 2013
This review is from: The Kingdom Of Gods (Paperback)
I really enjoyed this book, it got into my head in quite a strong way. I was impressed at the expanded view of the universe, which had a lot more about the godsrealm and the unknowable Maelstrom. I also liked the way you could tell that society had moved on in the decades since the last book. The main thing I liked was the characterisation of Sieh. He was one of the most enjoyable characters in the first book, and being inside his head only made him more successful as a character.
The format is the same as the previous two books the choice of narrator is a significant change. The first two books were narrated by (mostly) human women, whereas Sieh male and the oldest godling (a god who isn't one of the Three creator-deities), even though he normally takes the form of a child. It is interesting to have a narrator who is a god and sees mortals and their world from a very different viewpoint. Sieh gives us the reader more information about the wider universe and the gods. Sieh is an interesting mix of holy and irreverent, behaving both a stroppy, mischievous child and a powerful god, even though he spends most of the book adapting to no longer really being either.
The central plot is about Sieh adapting to his unwelcome mortality, and his relationship with sister and brother, Shahar and Dekarta. There is also a mystery plot about a new type of magic and a rogue godling, but though that becomes incredibly important right at the end of the book I didn't feel it had as much impact as the more personal sections of the story. The relationships between Sieh and the twins are complex and interesting. His initial romance with Shahar is an impetuous, adolescent one. Though the feelings are genuine the situation is tinged with deceit as Shahar fulfills her role as her mother's pawn. Sieh's later relationship with Dekarta (the extraneous, misplaced spare to Shahar's heir) is more open, if sometimes a little obsessive.
There's a sense of grand scale that increases towards the end of the book. The Three (the first and most powerful gods) set aside their millennia-long quarrels to try their eldest child. An apocalyptic turn of events matches Sieh's own experience of mortality as he prematurely ages and faces the death.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Really interesting and absorbing series, 27 Jan 2013
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This trilogy is a really original take on the fantasy genre - I have actually preferred the 2nd and 3rd books in the series, finding the protagonists more likeable. The book plays with morals and religion whilst also having lots of magic, adventure and twists and turns which I like. I also enjoyed how chasracters you thought you knew from earlier books aren't who you thought they were! A refreshing new series, the 2nd and 3rd books especially are written skillfully and I was thinking about them for quite a while after finishing. I'd buy it if I were you!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A great end to a wonderful series, 29 Oct 2012
This review is from: The Kingdom Of Gods (Paperback)
A century or so after the events of The Broken Kingdoms, godling Sieh, following a painful discovery, returns to his former prison Sky, where he meets and befriends two Arameri children. This friendship has devastating consequences for both Sieh and the children, and threatens to rock the twins' relationship to the core. However, there are bigger problems at hand: there is a malevolent force coming - one that threatens not only Sieh's nature, but also the very fabric that makes up the Hundred Thousand Kingdoms.

I finished the book in about a day or so, which may have had a lot to do with insomnia and an eight hour boat ride, but also had a fair amount to do with Jemisin's lush prose and skilful plotting. Not to mention its originality.This trilogy is a look at what fantasy could be if authors wouldn't stubbornly cling to the idea of fantasy being about quests or people in stone castles plotting against their neighbours. Not that I haven't been guilty of enjoying George RR Martin or Robin Hobb, but I think fantasy is strongest when there's a bit of variety.

As a trilogy, one of its main strengths is the fact that the plots and characters in each subsequent book are completely unique, but that each book leaves the universe in which Jemisin writes in a completely different state to how it began. Far from the static worlds of most fantasy, the Hundred Thousand Kingdoms are able to change and adapt. Instead of maintaining the status quo, our heroes (such as they are) look to shift the balance of power, and this makes it a much richer and more interesting world than the standard fare.

My main gripe has nothing to do with the actual book, but with the blurb (not the author's fault, I know), which seemed to imply that Shahar was the main character, whereas in fact Sieh was the viewpoint character. This is quite misleading, as it implies that her story is the important one, whereas her role is fairly intertwined with that of her brother, though they spend most of the story apart.

Sieh was one of my favourite characters from the first book, so it was interesting to see him from a new perspective. I think that this is (technically) the first book in the trilogy to be from the perspective of one of the gods, and that added a new layer as well. His relationship with the Arameri children was cleverly done, and reflected in a sense the relationship between Itempas, Nahadoth and Enefa - between three people, there will always be a degree of imbalance.

Part of the epic scope of this trilogy is that it's never just about one thing. It's not just people struggling with their problems, or about romances, or the meddling of or with gods, but all these things. Within this book, there are a couple of internal mysteries - both a personal one with Sieh, and one which will affect the entire universe, not least the Arameri, whose numbers are already dwindling, and who struggle to hold on to their power. Perhaps as a godling placed among mortals, Sieh is in a unique position to show us how the story unfolds. And one thing is certain - nothing can be the same again.

There are few series where I think it's truly possible to dip in to a later instalment and enjoy it properly - this is one series, due to the changing lead protagonists, where I think it could be done. However, I wouldn't recommend it, as the reading experience is enhanced by the prior knowledge of the characters and the world they live in.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Fitting End, 28 Nov 2011
This review is from: The Kingdom Of Gods (Paperback)
The last in the brillaint Inheritance trilogy and also the longest, this novel follows the childlike trickster godling Sieh who appeared in both The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms and The Broken Kingdoms. Sieh at first comes across as a selfish brat but as the book develops so too does his character and he becomes endearing as his life is taken through many terrible and surprising twists.

For me this novel was impossible to put down, every page had me gripped and every character was easy to visualise. The novel follows Sieh, and Shahar and Dekarta Arameri, twins bonded to Sieh in a way none of them understand, it is a bond that will test them over the years as they find themselves brought together as lovers and divided over the future of the Arameri family. Worse still is that there is a growing threat to the Arameri, a mysterious force that not even the gods or godlings can discover.

I don't want to spoil the plot too much but it really was a delight offering up romance, adventure and tragedy and bringing back familiar characters with added development. It was great to see more of Yeine in her role as a goddess, to find out what became of Nahadoth's mortal self and also to hear more of Itempas in his mortal form. It was also great to see a new Arameri family in power and to discover how Sky and Shadow have developed over the years.

I will admit that at first it was a struggle to care about Sieh or Shahar as both came across as annoying, childish and selfish characters to me but they did develop into more considerate and admirable characters as the plot developed and experience shaped them into more intelligent, sympathetic beings.

Overall it was the perfect finish to the series, poignant, sad, joyous and hopeful and I definitely look forward to future work from this author.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars excellent!, 14 July 2012
By 
Deanna young (Essex, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Kingdom Of Gods (Paperback)
brought as a gift for mypartner. arrived super quick and packaged very well. he was very pleased with this itemand i cannot list any faults.
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The Kingdom Of Gods
The Kingdom Of Gods by N. K. Jemisin (Paperback - 6 Oct 2011)
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