Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Paperwhite Shop now Shop Now Shop now

Customer Reviews

35
3.7 out of 5 stars
The Accidental Sorcerer: Book 1 of the Rogue Agent Novels
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:£9.99+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

Showing 1-8 of 8 reviews(3 star)show all reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 21 February 2010
This book really surpsised me because I didn't think it would be that good. It does get off to a slow start where Gerald is pitying himself but it gets better. If you're at that part now then stick to it because it's so funny and it has a good story to it.

Princess Mel and Reg are so odd characters but they've got to be the funniest "people" in the book.

The book is about a boring 3rd grade wizard who finds himself possessing power that is SO powerful that the 1st grade wizards would harm themselves attempting what he did. After losing his job(again) he decides to have a fresh start so he went to another world to work for a handsome prince.

But does the Angelic beauty hide the Devil...

Will all his friends die if he doesn't do an unforgivable task...
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 29 September 2013
The Accidental Sorcerer is the first book of the Rogue Agent series by K.E.Mills alias Karen Miller. A tale of magic, as the title suggests, but it is largely the magic of the characters themselves that is the strength of this book and the author. If you have read Karen Miller`s The Innocent Mage and you remember Asher and his progressive transformation from a fisherman to a skilled but very likable statesman, you'll know what I mean. The main characters in the Accidental Sorcerer: Gerald, an inept third-rate magician who seeds catastrophe wherever he treads: Reg, a bewitched bird whose tongue lashes out with hilarious repartee; Melissande, a princess disguised as an industrious frump in charge of the country's daily affairs; not to mention Rupert, her butterfly-loving younger brother, ... they are all both hilarious and endearing. Perhaps the least convincing is the villain king. It's sometimes hard to believe in the atrocities he instigates, maybe because the author shields us from their full force.

The decor of this book is not urban but it has that density and the hedged-in nature that are often the hallmarks of urban fantasy. None of your airy-fairy lightness to the Accidental Sorcerer. Yet it does have a lightness to it that is born of the dialogues, especially those that involve Reg who tells-it-like-it-is but often in most amusing ways. I'm looking forward to reading the next of the series: Witches Incorporated.

Review first published on Secret Paths: http://about-books.secret-paths.com/?p=5
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 28 July 2011
I started this book as a light and 'fluffy' read. I had just finished an epic fantasy on a grand scale(Game of Thrones) and I needed something a little less intense for my next read.
When I began to read I was a little disappointed, it read a little like a YA book. the protagonist, Gerald Dunwoody was a junior wizard who had just lost his job through no fault of his own. he was feeling very sorry for himself and took a job as a court wizard to King Lionel( it was a sort of 'This'll show'em gesture)
There were some amusing lines in the book, the talking bird Reg seems to have all the best lines , though the princess Melissande comes in a close second.
But about halfway through the book changes from light and frothy to a darker more sombre story. The nature of madness is examined and Gerald is tortured into breaking his oath and constructing something that he knows will cause death and destruction on a massive scale.
And to be honest with you it became a better read for it. I was on the verge of packing it in as a children's read but I'm glad I persevered and now I'm looking forward to reading the next book.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 27 February 2014
An OK story, good for reading on a Kindle during a commute. Pick it up and put it down as you need without it being un-put-down-able.

The most annoying aspect in the book is the bloody bird. She doesn't serve any point in the book other than to be an antagonist, mostly to the reader from my perspective. Seems like she was invented to be a Disney-type wise cracking side kick, but she just comes across as a pain at best and a total bitch the rest of the time.

I won't read the sequels because of this character.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 3 July 2014
Reasonable characterisation and plot, though oddly paced and with some annoyingly repetitive over used expressions (I thought at one point that if I saw "ass over tea-kettle" one more time my kindle was going out the window). Nicely consistent and well drawn setting is the most engaging thing, but constant squabbling of characters is wearing after a while.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 23 April 2013
could of been a lot better if he was not whining on every page does he ever stop in the rest of books or is it a trend ?
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 1 August 2010
An odd book. Lacks the charm of other Orbit titles such as the Black Magician Trilogy and certainly not in the league of fantasy writers such as Terry Pratchett.

To start with it has one of those absolutely awful Orbit photoshop style covers- so unoriginal and actually quite ugly.

The story starts interestingly, a fantasy world that contains many things we recognise from our own 21st century living. This world is completely unexplored and actually never fully realised. Society is not considered and we know very little of the world outside the main characters immediate situation(s). For semi-real fantasy worlds that are executed perfectly read Naomi Novik or Susanna Clarke.

Gerald- the main character is a bumbling, trodden on fool. He remains so throughout the entire book even after his remarkable discovery after an accident at a staff factory and he remains this way as the story closes. Reg- The sidekick is irritating and completely unlovable. Melissande is predictably the tamed shrew. Markham, Rupert, Shugat, Zazoor and Lional are all more interesting but never fully fleshed out.

In all a good idea/ set-up and arc that is not executed particularly well. In the hands of another author could have been excellent.

***(Some people tag this book as humorous! It contains little to no humour and I did not, when reading it, realise it was suppose to. If it is supposed to be humorous (I'm not sure it is) I would only give the book 1 star).
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 31 March 2010
I bought this used, on a day when nothing better was on offer, and while it is eminently readable it isn't going to set the world on fire. Of course as the start of a series (so it claims) there is a certain amount of scene setting to be done, so maybe later books get better, but I'll have to be pretty desperate (again) before I buy any more to check.

If you really want a 5 star 'amusing fantasy' book, you'd be better reading almost anything by Terry Pratchett or Robert Holt. If you want your fantasy straighter, then the earlier works of Eddings, Feist, or even Robin Hobb, or Weis & Hickman (if you really must have a female author for some reason) are all far superior (IMHO). If you want six stars, you'll have to stick to Lord of the Rings, of course.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
Witches Incorporated: Book 2 of the Rogue Agent Novels
Witches Incorporated: Book 2 of the Rogue Agent Novels by K. E. Mills (Paperback - 2 July 2009)
£6.39

Wizard Squared: Book 3 of the Rogue Agent Novels
Wizard Squared: Book 3 of the Rogue Agent Novels by K. E. Mills (Paperback - 1 July 2010)
£8.24

Wizard Undercover: The Rogue Agent sequence: Book Four
Wizard Undercover: The Rogue Agent sequence: Book Four by K. E. Mills (Paperback - 3 May 2012)
£7.99
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.