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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Imaginative, Intelligent and Entertaining Sci-Fi
Charles Stross has crafted a deeply thoughtful, elegant and many layered science fiction tale. The story is a fantastic mix of traditional sci-fi concepts (there are sly nods to things such as "Ghost in the Shell", "Do Androids dream electric sheep), coupled with fresh perspectives, new ideas and slick narrative and dialogue.

The most interesting aspect of this...
Published on 20 July 2009 by Kuma

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Was I disappointed...
I think this book suffered from a a back drop that was too colourful, I kept wanting questions answered about the post human socieites and culture that were not really relevant to the story being told. Freya's story is tragic because she cannot fulfill the purpose that she was designed for becasue there are no Human Males and she has to find a new path through her life...
Published on 15 Oct 2009 by Book Crazy


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4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable read that teases the mind but ultimately goes nowhere, 4 Mar 2012
By 
R. HOW "gymnophoria" (London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Saturn's Children (Paperback)
I was originally put off by reviews mentioning the complex plot: in a robot society where personality is merely software on a chip, how can we be sure who is really who? But I actually found it easy to keep up, and enjoyed what boils down to an old-fashioned espionage thriller set in an intriguing post-humanity solar system where only androids are left to carry on the functions of civilisation. My one complaint is, after all the interplanetary to-ing and fro-ing, identities swapped and masks revealed, not a great deal is really achieved or resolved. I suppose this paves the way for a sequel, but after ploughing through x number of pages, I was rather disappointed at the lack of satisfying payoff.

That said, Charles Stross still blows many of his contemporaries off the page, and this is a fun, rip-roaring read.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Worth a read, 18 Dec 2011
By 
W. Black "Bill Black" (Scarborough UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Saturn's Children (Paperback)
This is an odd one, although well worth a read.

First of all the protagonist is, let's be honest about this, an intelligent sex toy for boys. This leads the story into some very odd places indeed. She's also, like many of Charles Stross's heroes and heroines, not too good at seeing trouble coming, which leaves him describing those 'oh s#*t' moments he loves so much.

The setting is a post human solar system now inhabited by intelligent robots, with all the attendant problems you'd imagine that would cause.

The whole thing is an intricate and complicated romp around the solar system by a series of exotic means of transport, most of which read like the distillation of the results of a 3:00am conversation between a group of engineering undergraduates at an all night party...

The plot switches from 'I Robot' to 'The Maltese Falcon' to 'PG Wodehouse' to a straight spy spoof with little time for the reader to catch their breath between bouts of kinky robot sex and some excellent action set pieces in order to work out what's actually going on, indeed you're going to need to reread this one to pick up when stuff actually happens, which can be a problem when the characters can change their looks and identities at a moment's notice.

All in all an enjoyable romp with ideas that could have probably been stretched to three novels by a less prolific author. As it is it works well and kept me gripped for a couple of days.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good fun and some important concepts, 21 Feb 2011
By 
DB "davidbirkett" (Co. Kildare, Ireland (but born & raised Liverpool, UK)) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Saturn's Children (Paperback)
The top few reviews give a sufficiently detailed introduction to the book that there's no need for me to cover the same ground. But I have to add that the problem with virtually all space operas is that you have to suspend disbelief, because it seems highly unlikely that human interstellar travel will ever happen. So it was good to read an SF book that recognises this and suggests a way around it. Also there is a very good "female" protagonist - unusual in a book written by a man.
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5.0 out of 5 stars If you like SF - you're going to like this., 17 Dec 2010
This review is from: Saturn's Children (Paperback)
Well written, not space invaders, not space porn despite the fact that the principal protagonist is a cyber sex doll. A real trip - get both books together to avoid frustration.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Freya/Friday rules!, 1 Aug 2008
By 
Dawn Pickles "friend of freya" (Eskdale, Cumbria, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Saturn's Children (Hardcover)
Charles Stross has gone on record as saying that this novel is not a homage to Heinlein but a continuation of his vision, the novel that Robert Anson Heinlein would have written if he was still with us. Having re-read Friday (the most obviously similar Heinlein novel)I say that Charlie has fulfilled that brief and much, much more. This book is a real rollercoaster, with action and plot twists that would daunt a James Bond, and enough solid science as a background to make the Creator-less universe hang plausibly together. For those that know Charles Stross' other work, such as Accelerando, the Laundry series, Halting State, Glasshouse etc, this book is yet another brilliantly new and engrossing read from a writer who delivers fresh, funny, frantic fiction seemingly on demand. Buy this book - you shouldn't be disappointed!
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Many layered, 8 July 2008
By 
D. Harris (Oxford, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Saturn's Children (Hardcover)
Where to start in describing this book? There's such a lot in it. It's excellent to read, a really good story that keeps moving and springing surprises right to the end. More than anything, the plot is that of a good thriller, with allies, factions, betrayals, double and triple loyalties.

Freya is a robot, created for sex with her One True (human) Love. Inconveniently, the human race died out before she was manufactured, so she has to make her living as she can, avoiding falling into slavery to one of the creepy aristocrat robots, with everything made more complicated by her having internalized the identities of several of her robot siblings. Who themselves have internalized the identities of... etc. This makes for an intriguing - and sympathetic - central character, a truly human creation.

Nothing here though is as it seems, not even the ever helpful Jeeves Corporation, which has robot butlers on every planet or other inhabited rock, eager to please (while carrying on a secret mission). And "robot" itself is a tricky term - a dire insult in a post human world, where our synthetic replacements carry civilization on, still bound by the limitations and codes of behaviour built in by their Creators. One of the more intriguing aspects of the book is how Stross works through the implications of this - both in terms of the society it creates (a slave owning aristocracy) and of the ethics - or lack of them - that led to this. The central dilemma is, if we create robots, we want to be protected from them, don't we? So we make them obey us. So we make slaves. And as these robots are actually modelled on us - apparently we never found any other successful way of making an AI - we have, in essence, created human slaves...

All this, and a blizzard of cultural references, puns and in-jokes (one example: robot civilization is terrified of "pink" and "green" goo - animal or vegetable material created by criminals working in secret labs which, it is feared, could spread uncontrollably and cause ruin), dazzling technology so well explained and right that you just know that's how it should be done. Perfect, absolutely perfect.

Only one problem - and I hate to be picky - but I wanted more. The civilization described here is so well conceived, it could support a dozen more books. Please!
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9 of 13 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Acceptable but not Stoss' best, 16 Aug 2009
By 
Gareth Wilson - Falcata Times Blog "Falcata T... - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Saturn's Children (Paperback)
To be honest not the best work ever released by Charles. Unfortunately, it seems to try to explore way too many themes without delivering on many of the promises within, sadly letting the reader down as it appears to be more a book that's either expected to sell by the authors name or just to hit deadline so that the author gets paid.

A great shame to be honest as this sort of novel is something to which Charles normally excels. The characters are confusing, the plot convoluted and seems to borrow heavily from books and films of the last thirty years bringing nothing new to the fore. It really will make me question my placing of this authors books in my TBR list and he'll have to do something special in his next book to make up for this offering.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars This is good but not his best, 26 April 2010
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This review is from: Saturn's Children (Paperback)
Charles Stross is a great hard SF writer obsessed with the coming singularity [ Vernor Vinge ]
This book is set in a future where there are no humans just robots. The heroine is a female sex robot with no men to serve.
I find it hard to care about an adventure where all the humans are extinct.
I recommend his short story collection Toast and have bought Singularity Sky.
I read The Atrocity Archives but I should have been warned by the title: its very nasty horror. I was hoping for something like J G Ballard's Atrocity Exhibition but I got a nastier treatment of Lovecraftian Nazi torture and Cthulu Mythos. Let Yog Sothos lie.
Let the dyeing die - Let the lying lie as Captain Beefheart sang.
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0 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Book purchased for a third party., 13 Nov 2009
By 
R. W. Mason (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Saturn's Children (Paperback)
This book was purchased for a third party who was very satisfied with both the condition and delivery timescale.
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0 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars ok-ish, 4 Aug 2009
By 
Mr. Fg Tindle (Wallington, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Saturn's Children (Paperback)
Having read alot of stross this a atypical of his works. Think long tail rather than short tail read.
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Saturn's Children
Saturn's Children by Charles Stross (Paperback - 2 July 2009)
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