Customer Reviews

4
2.8 out of 5 stars
The Grand Conjunction: Book Three of Astropolis
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:£7.99+Free shipping with Amazon Prime

Your rating(Clear)Rate this item
Share your thoughts with other customers

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 8 June 2009
The Grand Conjunction is the grand finale of Sean Williams' Astropolis series and follows on from Saturn Returns (book 1), Cenotaxis (novella) and Earth Ascendant (book 2). This is a series that is set in the far future and covers a time period of around a million and a half years through all stories. How Sean Williams manages to keep the plot focused over time scales like this is impressive in its own right!

The Grand Conjunction (at least the start) is set around 700,000 years after Earth Ascendant which, in reality, is headache inducing. Luckily enough there is a short chapter at the start that basically outlines what has gone on since the start of the series. This is a good thing, at least in my opinion, as the series can feel very fractured at the best of times and this primer brings it together nicely. Once we get into the novel proper we find a very unusual thing: a fiftiesnoir detective story. That's what it reads like, and lasting for almost a quarter of the novel it is slightly overlong and disruptive to the pace that should have been present at the beginning, although it is fully tied into the plot. Don't get me wrong, I loved reading this section, but in the context of the story it felt misplaced and unnecessary. Once we get into the story proper things continue along at a good pace, following ties toImre's fort-self, the Luminous and the Barons.

I must admit that although The Grand Conjunction was enjoyable, the time differences ultimately made things a little too difficult to get my head into the book properly. Coming off Earth Ascendant and finding the main character thrust so far into the future with events having continued in his absence was the one thing that the story couldn't save itself from. Thetime spans involved are the essence of this story, and providing you can keep enjoying the novel and following details despite these you will find a rewarding series inAstropolis . Unfortunately this strength was my downfall and although I quite happily devoured the novel, some distant past details eluded me.

If you have the time I would strongly suggest reading the Astropolis series back-to-back to fully appreciate the dizzying time spans that Sean Williams has presented here. With such a grand offering I can only tell you that I'm not disappointed in the novel, but in myself for not being able to enjoy to its fullest.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 9 January 2010
The Grand Conjunction has a precis at the start with the story so far. Although I read the two previous novels I still needed the 'previously on Astropolis' to catch up. Then it was straight into a longer than necessary Phillip Marlow style tale of blondes, booze and guns set in what appeared to be 1940's America but soon proved to a created enviromnent. Then out to the galaxy almost half a million years after Earth Ascendant where I got lost in the characters, their motivations, interactions and even their reality. Round about halfway through I gave up. The galaxy spanning civilisation did evoke a sense of wonder, which is why this does not get one star.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 2 December 2011
Just in case it isn't obvious to you this is the third book in a trilogy. When I first started this trilogy I was raving to anyone and everybody about how it was one of the best things that I had read in a long time, and it was. Unfortunately the first book was a definite highlight and with each book the story became less and less interesting. In the end you really didn't care what happened or too who. A terrible shame for a book story that began with such promise. It is questionable if it is even worth reading this for a conclusion to the trilogy.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Yes, as other reviewer's have commented, this series span's hundred's of thousand's of years, and it is advised that you read them in pretty quick order. But this whole series, William's first space opera without Shane Dix, is still a page turning thought provoking exercise of mind bending concepts. I couldn't go into much detail without spoiling the plot. It's just one of those stories that you have to dive into and give it a go. If you've read anything by the author before, especially 'Evergence' or the 'Orphan's' series, I think this one, while different, is a worthy addition to the genre. William's is a thinking man's writer, much like Vinge or Benford, Reynold's or Hamilton. His work is well thought out, but he leaves plenty to think about when you get to the end. Go on, you know you want to!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.