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50 of 52 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sack the editor, hail the author.
It's always hard writing a review for every book in a trilogy, and normally I'd simply write one for all three books on the final instalment. The Age of the Five however will be an exception in my aim to persuade you to read it. You wont regret it - trust me.

Don't worry though; I won't reveal any spoilers.

In the Priestess of the White, we start in...
Published on 14 Jan. 2009 by L. K. Taylor

versus
61 of 61 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good Gods!
The start of a new series following the author's success with the Black Magician trilogy. This is set in a world ruled by Gods who have five representatives 'The white' - powerful sorcerers who govern on their behalf. These sorcerers are the good guys (and girls!) and they use their powers and influence for the good of the world. The story is about a young girl elected to...
Published on 5 April 2006 by Nick Brett


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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good start but no comparison with the Magician's Guild, 9 Feb. 2006
By 
J. Cooper "Jude" (Hove, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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I enjoyed the satart of the new trilogy by Trudi Canavan and she created her new world with the thoroughness I would expect from her previous writing. But, a couple of niggles. The love story is pretty much the same one as in the Magicians Guild series - new but very powerful girl from the wrong side of the tracks falls for her teacher/mentor/older man/most inappropriate person she can find. Secondly, alhtough it is a trilogy the book should stand alone as a complete novel - this leaves such a huge cliff hanger that it screams out for Volume 2. Also, I don't find Auraya as appealing as Sonea, maybe a bit too smug? Ultimately, although I enjoyed it, it is nowhere as strong as her earlier novels and had I not read them first, I wouldn't rush to read more. I will stick with them however, and hope that Volume 2 is up to TC's usual standard.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars reader, 19 April 2006
Not the best book I've ever read but good enough to keep me interested in buying the second installment which should be good...its a slow starter but like most triologies the second book is better.
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74 of 83 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great read!, 5 Dec. 2005
By A Customer
Worked in Oz a few years back and read the Black Magician Trilogy there. Out a few months before here as I believe Trudi Canavan is an Ozzy. Went back recently for a holiday and was pleased to see this, her new book out in paper back. Consequently have read it before it comes out here in Feb 2006.
Really enjoyed the book. Centres around a priestess, Auraya, who becomes one of the gods five 'chosen'. Given the gift of immortality and various other magicsl gifts, this first book in the series deals with Auraya's transition into her new role and sets the scene in a land filled with interesting characters and scenes.
I thoroughly enjoyed the book and am really looking forward to the next one in the series. If you enjoyed her first trilogy (read it if you haven't yet!) and like me are a fan of David Eddings (Belgariad & Mallorean, not the weaker Elder Gods stuff) and David Gemmel and other decent fantasy, youll enjoy this I hope.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It is good, but the trilogy could have been so much more, 25 Sept. 2009
This review is from: Priestess Of The White: Book 1 of the Age of the Five (Paperback)
Don't get me wrong, this trilogy of the age of five gave me some entertaining hours. The concept, the ideas, the races described are well written and orginal.
Those are strong points for me, but the lack of character depth spoiled it for me a bit. Leaird/Mirar could have been such an interesting character...but he is simply not, I almost feel sorry for the character by the way he is potrayed, a lost chance there, in my opinion.
Alas the same counts for most of the characters, some where simply irritating. I had to skip the parts with Ella, as she was so unbelievably boring that I could have strangled her, I felt literally like....oh no..not her again! Luckily she is only featured in the third book.
So admittely, I just skimmed quite a few of the side plots, as I was getting impatient for the plot to evolve.
The end was bitterly dissapointing.....I was amazed...I even checked to make sure if it was indeed last page.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Reasonably entertaining, but nothing special, 26 Oct. 2008
By 
Marcus Denham (Gloucestershire, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Priestess Of The White: Book 1 of the Age of the Five (Paperback)
Having had a good laugh at the quality of the writing of her first books (which I steered clear of), I was given this one by a friend who *had* read the first trilogy and assured me they were an improvement. "Priestess of the White" is (importantly) the first of another trilogy. This isn't clear from the front cover, but does explain why the book ends so abruptly, after possibly the world's most one-dimensional description of a battle.
Also worth noting is that there is a glossary at the back, which is not otherwise mentioned. This may be because the first trilogy had such a glossary. If you only find this *after* you've read the book, all the way through you'll be annoyed by her plucking terms from apparently thin air and not bothering to elaborate. It's only mildly annoying, however, since her lack of imagination has lead to (for example) a "domestic animal bred for [its] meat and milk [that] resides in mountains" being referred to as a "gowt". Can you guess what she's thinking of?
The story focuses on Auraya, one of five priests chosen to be the Gods representatives. The subject of the second book, an immortal sorceress, also gets quite a lot of column inches (although playing virtually no role in the plot of the first book at all). The first of these ends up sleeping with someone she shouldn't, the second ends up "temping" as a whore. The emphasis the author puts on relationships (and sleeping around) doesn't detract too much from the main plot, however.
Overall, as long as you don't expect too much from this book, you'll probably enjoy it. Be warned that it isn't in the same league as David Eddings' Belgariad, however. Best get this trilogy out of a library, or borrow it.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Excellent story concept - convoluted narrative, 30 Dec. 2006
By 
Aria-May (Channel Islands) - See all my reviews
After the excellent Black Magician series I was eager to read more by Trudi Canavan, and whilst Priestess of the White is potentially an exciting tale, the story-telling itself does not allow the story to develop easily and smoothly. The story has well drawn characters, some with a tantalising hint of mystery and the promise of further development in later books, and it is this compelling characterisation that ensures the reader puts up with the awkward jumps in the narrative. This is a frustrating book, because I can see in my minds eye that Trudi Canavan might well draw the myriad of strands together brilliantly at the end of the trilogy: the different strands do not ramble aimlessly, and they all seem to be going somewhere, but there's just too much jumping around. The narrative jumps from location to location, often in the middle of a chapter, and unless you've internalised the names of the characters and remembered which one is (e.g.) a birdman and which a sea creature, it is quite frustrating trying to follow it.

The book is obviously written to a plan, and I daresay there are elements that Trudi Canavan has to set up now in order to develop them later in the trilogy, but she has sacrificed the flow of the narrative in order to do so, and I am hoping it will all be worth it in the end.

Having said that - don't let what I've written put you off: some of the characters are beautifully drawn and the story is crammed full of potential for exciting and unexpected developments in the second book 'The Last of the Wilds'. On balance I enjoyed the book, and recommend it, my only caveat is to say to those readers expecting something on a par with Black Magician, it may not be quite what you expect or hope for.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Stop and think..., 13 Jun. 2010
I very nearly didn't buy a copy of "Priestess of the White" due to exceedingly large amounts of negative reviews. The few positive reveiws persuaded me, however, and I am exceedingly glad they did.

It's true, this book does not live up to The High Lord (last of The Black Magician Trilogy), but it most certainly lives up to The Magicians Guild and, having read all the books in both trilogies, It became clear that they are similar in that the first is the weakest, the last the strongest.

The characters here are very easy to appreciate and each one is interesting for different reasons - my personal favourites would be Emerahl and Auraya, which is just as well given as Auraya is clearly the main character.

The main weakness this book appears to have is the chessboard set up of black Vs white. This, however, is explained very thoroughly in the second and third books, meaning that reveiwers who have complained about the constant thuggish/shadowed nature of the "bad guys" never looked at the prologue for the last of the wilds.

My overall message is: treat this as the first of three, not as a book itself. I saw this as a platform that sets of the main arcing story of the next two books, making them richer and more enjoyable for it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wow, 17 Nov. 2007
This review is from: Priestess Of The White: Book 1 of the Age of the Five (Paperback)
I wanted to give this book a five because I did love it but I could not for a couple of reasons.The main reason I did'nt was because the story jumps around a lot. Although it is all very cleverly connected I felt frustrated as I wanted to read more of each section. Just as you get into reading about one character it flips to another. I think due to this the story did not hold me as passionately as it could have.
Also in places I found it lacking in emotional depth. This sounds really harsh but I do not mean it to be as the story was fabulous. I just wanted it to make me laugh and cry. It had the potential to but it did not take me to that extreme.
Now I will tell you why I loved this book. The individual characters were lovely. My favourites were Tryss,Danjin and Emerahl. Also you feel sympathy and admiration for certain groups. How could anyone read this and not fall for the Siyee and the Dreamweavers?
The complexity and detail of the story is impressive. The concept was interesting and there was good continuity. There is also mystery surrounding certain characters which makes me desperately want to read the second book.
My advice to a fellow reader would be do not give up on this one. Its an enjoyable relaxing read.
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26 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another notch on the belt, 25 Feb. 2006
Having enjoyed the books written by Trudi Canavan previous [mainly the Black Magicians Trilogy] I was pleased to find out that she had released the first in a new series called the Age of the Five. I purchased the book from Amazon with high hopes [for a very good price if I say so myself!] and was not let down.
Once again she has managed to create not just a selection of characters, but an entirely different world - something that is not only difficult but so badly handled by many other writers. Often when people try to create something as different as another world, they find themselves lapsing back into actual reality or taking the possibility of this new universe far too far. Trudi Canavan joins a short list [on the fingers of one hand] of fantasy writers that I believe has pipped this down to a tee, and I have read a great deal of fantasy. The many layered Hanian Society not only includes the presence of politcal strife, but that of relgious introduction - something which can be a risky subject to try and write about.
The main character of our book, Auraya, is complex and interesting, often causing scandle in her wake [if not always on purpose]. Focusing on the Circlian relgion, worship of the five surviving Gods from the "Age of Many" leads to the five "chosen" white, each being given the gifts of terrible magic and immortality. The plot jackknifes from point to point, taking in a volume of plot points and using the threat of dark cults as a realistic comparision to the peace loving Hanians.
We experience a wealth of culture and mystery as we follow the text, with moments were we had to go back and read it again just to take it all in. This does not make it a bad book, just one that slakes the thirst of true fantasy fans to dabblers alike. This book is not for the faint hearted however, it requires a love of fictional writing, and the ability to follow many different plots and prospectives at once, also I read a few online reviews, and have [with others] come to the conclusion that it needs a strong understanding of the ups and downs of english language as it doesn't always follow usual gramatical rules. If you meet the requirements, then you will find this book a real eye opener, an original fantasy plot in a world of books that just seem to be carbon copies of the last. Don't miss your chance to have a read, it isn't every day that something this good pops up!
For a vastly enjoyable book, and the prospect of an even better trilogy culmination, buy this book and read it. I have. 4 times!
Looking forward to the 2nd release:)
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Priestess of the White, 17 Jun. 2007
By 
Clare "Bookaholic" (England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Priestess Of The White: Book 1 of the Age of the Five (Paperback)
When Auraya was chosen to become a priestess, it meant leaving behind her village, her family and the friendship she had formed with Leiard, the local Dreamweaver. Masters of herb lore and healing, Dreamweavers were despised for their heathen beliefs, and Auraya knew that she must hide her respect for the godless healers if she was to succeed in her new role.

Now, ten years later she is a Priestess of the White, gifted with exceptional powers by the gods. Auraya still needs time to fully adapt to her new abilities but time is the one thing she does not have. Mysterious black-clad sorcerers plague the land, raising fears that these powerful strangers may even be stronger than the gods' chosen five. As hostile forces gather momentum, the White work to seal alliances wherever they can. If the land is to be drawn back from the brink of war, Auraya will need to master her Gifts and call upon all of the courage and wisdom at her disposal. For if the tide is not turned quickly, Auraya fears she may be remembered as the last Priestess of the White...

Having heard from other people who have read this book I have put off from reading this for a long time! I have yet to read The Black Magician Trilogy so figured it would be better to read this first, however I can honestly say that I loved this book! Whilst Auraya was not the most exciting of characters I did find her quite interesting and don't think the character developed to her full potential in this book, hopefully she will in the following two books.

Emerahl, on the other hand was quite interesting and at times quite amusing!Auraya becomes one of the five whites who are the avatars of the Pantheon of Five Gods. To become a white one must be able to move further than the initial magic of being able to heat a pan or light a candle.

I really enjoyed this, my first Trudi Canavan and without a doubt be reading more, definitely one to read if your a fan of fantasy. There is not a huge amount of romance just little bits here and there so if you like a romance based fantasy this is possibly not for you.

This is not terribly fast moving, but that said I did not find any part of the book to be boring, definitely one of my favourite reads of 2007 so far!
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Priestess Of The White: Book 1 of the Age of the Five
Priestess Of The White: Book 1 of the Age of the Five by Trudi Canavan (Paperback - 6 July 2006)
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