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40 Reviews
5 star:
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3 star:
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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Top class stuff
Despite reading complaints regarding the highly detailed and complex world created by Bakker which stated his book was quite hard to get into i bought it because of the promise of a darker, more mature fantasy than normal. I was not disappointed. Bakkers writing and the world he creates have a depth and subtlety which are all to rare in the fantasy genre and the...
Published on 13 Aug 2005 by Longbelly

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18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Dour
R Scott Bakker's "The Darkness That Comes Before" is reasonably well-written. However, it is to my taste at times rather ponderous and unremittingly dour. Fantasy fiction is without doubt my preferred genre and I have read many many thousands of pages. Some of it is light-weight fluff, some of it seems to want to "out-Tolkein" the Master.
Bakker, however, seems to...
Published on 18 July 2007 by MKJ


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6 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A fantastic take on history, 1 Sep 2006
By 
Mr. Peter Parsons (London, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Darkness That Comes Before: Book 1 of the Prince of Nothing (Paperback)
Take the story of the first crusade. Add a false prophet, a wizard and a harlot and mix together with a bucket full of outlandish names, a few strange creatures and enough padding to fill a mattress. What you are left with is the Prince of Nothing series. Having said this, it remains an enjoyable read albeit with a tendency towards seediness.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The Darkness That Comes Before: Prince of Nothing, 29 Sep 2013
An all seeing, ever powerful hero is sent on a quest to kill his father. With the ability to read and control anyone, he attempts to take over a holy war to reach his goal.
I was at first interested, and then intrigued at where this book was going. It is reasonably well written, although the concept of the a who can manipulate anyone to do his bidding very quickly gets old.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Boring, 2 Aug 2013
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This review is from: The Darkness That Comes Before: Book 1 of the Prince of Nothing (Paperback)
I found this book very long and struggled to finish it I did not get attached to any of the characters. I will read the other books of the trilogy as I have bought the trilogy in one go following the advice of a friend and the amazon reviews.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The_Limper, 3 Jun 2012
This review is from: The Darkness That Comes Before: Book 1 of the Prince of Nothing (Paperback)
very good read and is in a style that would help if you had a little knowledge of crusade era lingo.(especially for the next 2 books)this book is easier to read than the next 2 books as they are heavy onPhilosophy ramblings that go further than need be,but you will want to stay the course and finish the series.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Boring Boring Boring, 3 Nov 2013
This review is from: The Darkness That Comes Before: Book 1 of the Prince of Nothing (Paperback)
I got 160 pages into this book, nothing happened, there wasn't one character I cared about or was vaguely interested in.
I can't remember the last book I didn't finish but life is too short to continue with this.
If a quarter of the book isn't enough time to engage the reader then the author has failed.
It is the first book of the Prince of Nothing. Nothing will persuade me to read any more.
The only consolation was that I bought it on Amazon Marketplace so didn't waste too much money, it is still in good condition so maybe the local charity shop will get some benefit from the book as I didn't.
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17 of 38 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The cover art is interesting as is the blurb..., 23 Jan 2007
By 
S. ten Have (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Darkness That Comes Before: Book 1 of the Prince of Nothing (Paperback)
This book was an impulse buy bred out of a need for a new author and an ongoing interest in all things 'concerning dragons and wizards'.

My first warning should really have been the two prologues, yes two prologues, which seemed to me to be something of an indulgence by R. Scott Bakker, possibly even some arrogance. The prologues are well written, contain a promise of action and a well paced beginning to a story if a little confusing but this is something that a well written introduction should do, introduce, confuse and intrigue.

All is well that starts well? No most definitely not.

This is an over written piece of work that wastes a great many pages delivering a huge amount of information without context or apparent relevance. It contains character names that you spend so much time attempting to remember how to pronounce them that you struggle both in getting to know the character and in perceiving any real pace to the story itself.

Personally I can't stand a book where the writer feels the need to keep a 'Character and Faction Glossary' in the back of the book in order to keep the reader from getting lost in the imagined complexity of the writers created world. Some may say that if I don't want complexity that I should read David Eddings or similar; I would say that I read a book for escapism not to struggle with a writers self proclaimed cleverness.

Wordy beyond belief would be another way that I would describe Bakkers writing style. His writing is cumbersome to the extreme spending the majority of his descriptive writing in metaphor and simile. I got rapidly to the point where I just wished that he would get on with the story rather than bogging us down with trying to impress the reader with his vast vocabulary. Again I'm reading the book for the story, not the English lesson.

Lost somewhere within Bakkers writing there is a good story that really held some promise if he'd only let it flow a bit more and stop letting it get bogged down in the minor (but colourful like the rays of the sun falling like spring rain on a field of wild flowers; an ocean riot that doth please the eye as we as warms the heart like... well you get the point ;)) details.

Would I recommend it? No definitely not.

So why did I give it two stars? Because the cover art and the blurb convinced me to part with my hard earned cash.
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars What a load of dribble, 11 Jan 2014
When people who hate the fantasy genre and want to make fun of it, they'll use this book.
It is not dark, mature or good after the first chapter.
The only reason to give this a good review is because you're bitter you brought it and want others to suffer with you. Don't waste your pennies, this book is what sample downloads were made for.
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3 of 13 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars hard work, 14 July 2004
Tried reading this twice then gave up due to lack of interest,which is unusual for me as i nearly always finish the book i am reading incase it gets better but i got so bored trying to prononce the names and the story just did not excite me.
I am sorry but i had just finished reading steven eriksons new novel and this was a big disapointment after that.
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5 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Holy Cow!, 28 Feb 2004
This has to be one of the best books I have ever read.
Bakker writes incredably well and is a joy to read. I suspect that this book will do well in the UK (it did quite well in Canada) and in the US.
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1 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not poor but not good either, 13 Nov 2007
By 
D. Nelson (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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Entertaining enough but doesnt compare to the very best of the genre...will appear dated and be pretty much forgotten in ten years time.
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The Darkness That Comes Before: Book 1 of the Prince of Nothing
The Darkness That Comes Before: Book 1 of the Prince of Nothing by R. Scott Bakker (Paperback - 26 May 2005)
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