Customer Reviews


68 Reviews
5 star:
 (27)
4 star:
 (18)
3 star:
 (10)
2 star:
 (4)
1 star:
 (9)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


126 of 129 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Jordan goes back to the beginning...
Firstly, it's nice to see that here, in comparison to the US amazon site, there's only one person reviewing the book who hasn't read it and has given it a one star. I can well understand fans annoyance at having to wait for the next book but no one is forcing them to buy this book, it is not an integral part of the main series, nor has it claimed to be.
This is a...
Published on 12 Jan 2004 by D. Wright

versus
21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Wheel spins yet again
It is almost impossible for a reviewer to seperate New Spring from the main body of the Wheel of time series. However does that do so will realise that Robert Jordan has lost none of his ability to write a good story. Apart from the last chapter (25) which is the same material as the short story from the Legends Anthology, the novella contains all new material. Sharply...
Published on 15 Jan 2004 by Amazon Customer


‹ Previous | 1 27 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Wheel spins yet again, 15 Jan 2004
It is almost impossible for a reviewer to seperate New Spring from the main body of the Wheel of time series. However does that do so will realise that Robert Jordan has lost none of his ability to write a good story. Apart from the last chapter (25) which is the same material as the short story from the Legends Anthology, the novella contains all new material. Sharply written and with a noticeable pace to the story that has been lacking in the main books, New Spring provides wonderful insight into the workings of the White Tower, and the characters of Moraine, Lan and others who feature in later books. However, when one weighs the price of this short novel, the inclusion of the material from Legends, and the whole question of whether it is appropriate to release a prequel while the main tale hangs unfinished, one must conclude that New Spring, although deserving of it's place in the Wheel of Time corpus, is a well written but unnessacary addition at this time.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


126 of 129 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Jordan goes back to the beginning..., 12 Jan 2004
By 
D. Wright (Clapham, London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Firstly, it's nice to see that here, in comparison to the US amazon site, there's only one person reviewing the book who hasn't read it and has given it a one star. I can well understand fans annoyance at having to wait for the next book but no one is forcing them to buy this book, it is not an integral part of the main series, nor has it claimed to be.
This is a prequel to the Wheel of Time series, now 10 books long. In Jordan's most recent interview (Jan 04) he states that he anticipates being able to finish in perhaps two books (he has been saying this since 1994 however, so be warned). While it has been advertised as an entry point to the series, I would not recommend it as such. Concepts are not sufficiently explained and to be honest the Eye of the World, the first book in the series, can work as a stand alone book. Try that before this.
The book comes in essentially two parts; the first concerns Moiraine and Siuan, two young women who feature later in the series. The story documents how they become fully-fledged Aes Sedai after many years of training and how they come to begin a search for the Dragon Reborn. This part of the book is great for fans in that we see a lot more of the White Tower than previously. We also see what could be deemed 'normal' AS training as opposed to that shown for Elayne, Egwene and Nynaeve in the main series. Jordan's writing style, in contrast to his more recent work, is concise yet retaining his trademarks to a sufficient degree to be interesting.
The second part of the novel is essentially the novella in Legends. If you've already read this, then the last 100 pages will simply be the same old material.
If your a fan and haven't got Legends, see this as simply more material. An enjoyable read even if it does not progress the series. As a non-fan, this could be a confusing novel that in the end stops before the real action begins.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Oh please Mr Jordan....hurry up!, 30 Jan 2004
By A Customer
This book is an ok read, but my appreciation of it was much soured by my annoyance at Mr Jordan's continued inability to bring this story to a close. At least the Leighs managed to finish what they started in the Belgariad before they returned to cash in on prequels.
What an author asks of us is a person's most precious asset, time. I feel robbed of mine, partly because I have to waste so much time re-reading his previous books and the special webistes, just so I can gather the many strings and threads of the plot again!
This book does not serve as a good intro for new WoT readers, it is suitable for those people who have read all TWELVE (eventual) books, who want to reminisce. I would recommend Robert Jordan to anyone...but not until 2007/2008 or whenever he finishes his series - at which point I will once again count him a great author.
I wish he could have taken a leaf from Tolkien and not publish his life's work until it is finished!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


30 of 32 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Back to basics, 20 Jan 2004
By 
N. Clarke (Lancs, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
It's prequel number one (of three) for Jordan as the end of the Wheel of Time recedes ever farther from sight.
Leaving aside the necessity or otherwise of further bloating an already mammoth series, examined on its own merits _New Spring_ has more to recommend it than the last few instalments in the series proper. Without the need to buoy up a multiplicity of storylines, Jordan produces a fast-paced, engaging tale. It's Lan and Moiraine: The Early Years, essentially; set twenty years before the other books, this deals with Gitara's Foretelling of the Dragon's rebirth, and how a young Cairhienin Accepted gains the shawl and finds her Warder.
The problem is the very 'expansion' that is responsible for this tale being republished. The original 'New Spring' novella from _Legends_ is included here with few changes (bar some extra incidents on the road to Chachin), and as such remains well worth the read - if you don't already own a copy of _Legends_. The new material tacked onto the beginning, however, will appeal only to real WoT masochists. An account of Siuan and Moiraine's ascent from Accepted to full sisters, it's sometimes entertaining in its portrait of the series' key players in their youth, but on the whole it's too redolent of the later books in the WoT - full of unmemorable characters and info-dump exposition, devoid of tension or much in the way of humour.
Newcomers should go to _The Eye of the World_ and its immediate successors, where the exploration of the White Tower is pulled off far more gradually and elegantly. Fans will probably buy this one anyway, but be warned: if you've read the excellent original story, there's little new here.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Back to basics, 14 Jun 2005
By 
N. Clarke (Lancs, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: New Spring: A Wheel of Time Prequel (Paperback)
It's prequel number one (of three) for Jordan as the end of the Wheel of Time recedes ever farther from sight.
Leaving aside the necessity or otherwise of further bloating an already mammoth series, examined on its own merits _New Spring_ has more to recommend it than the last few instalments in the series proper. Without the need to buoy up a multiplicity of storylines, Jordan produces a fast-paced, engaging tale. It's Lan and Moiraine: The Early Years, essentially; set twenty years before the other books, this deals with Gitara's Foretelling of the Dragon's rebirth, and how a young Cairhienin Accepted gains the shawl and finds her Warder.
The problem is the very 'expansion' that is responsible for this tale being republished. The original 'New Spring' novella from _Legends_ is included here with few changes (bar some extra incidents on the road to Chachin), and as such remains well worth the read - if you don't already own a copy of _Legends_. The new material tacked onto the beginning, however, will appeal only to real WoT masochists. An account of Siuan and Moiraine's ascent from Accepted to full sisters, it's sometimes entertaining in its portrait of the series' key players in their youth, but on the whole it's too redolent of the later books in the WoT - full of unmemorable characters and info-dump exposition, devoid of tension or much in the way of humour.
Newcomers should go to _The Eye of the World_ and its immediate successors, where the exploration of the White Tower is pulled off far more gradually and elegantly. Fans will probably buy this one anyway, but be warned: if you've read the excellent original story, there's little new here.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better going backwards than forwards it seems..., 7 Feb 2004
By 
Iceni Peasant (Norfolk, England) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
After being so disappointed with Crossroads Of Twilight I approached this book with a little concern that it was just going to lengthen and complicate established plots and character development. I was however pleasantly surprised to find Mr. Jordan going back to the style of writing that had me hooked on the series in the beginning.
It was fascinating and intriguing to read the back story of Moiraine and Siuan as Accepted in the Tower and how they became aware of the Dragon Reborn and how it shaped their futures.
It was also nice to see what kind of man Lan was before he met Moiraine and how those two eventually met. Several elements from the whole series are answered in this book and neatly rounded off.
I am disappointed to hear the author maybe writing two more prequels rather than getting onto Vol 11 next....but this book was very good and interesting. The debate is whether he knows where Vol 11 will be at and HOW to finish the series....but this prequel is a huge improvement in interest value than Vol 10 was.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Jordan returns to form, 1 April 2005
This review is from: New Spring: A Wheel of Time Prequel (Paperback)
Like many other fans of The Wheel of Time series, I have been becoming increasingly disillusioned with the later instalments in the epic. However, this prequel is a good return to form from Robert Jordan.
A lot of the "padding" (e.g. long and pointless descriptions, women drinking tea and clutching and smoothing skirts etc.) has gone, which means that New Spring is much shorter than the more recent novels, which is a good thing in my opinion. There is also a lot of action and the storyline canters along at a good pace.
OK, some of irritations are still there (in particular, Jordan appears unable to develop female characters very well, as the younger Moiraine and Siuan as Accepted and new Aes Sedai are a little too similar in behaviour and character to Elayne, Egwene and Nynaeve and almost unrecognisable from the older versions of themselves portrayed in the novels that follow), but all in all a good novel that will be enjoyed by fans of WoT.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Wheel Turns, 3 Feb 2004
Robert Jordan has begun to speed up his Wheel of time after its slow down in the previous major books. This prequel is a fresh and sprightly story which moves at a faster pace, returning to the formula of the early Wheel of time books that kept you turning the pages.
It tells the story of Lan Mandragoran and Moiraine Damodred and the forging of a union that will shape the battle to come against the dark one. It is a story filled with humour, danger and excitment and if I hadn't read part of it before in the Legends collection I may have given it more stars. I look forward with some anticipation to the further 2 prequels expected in between the next major entries in the series.
Robert Jordan
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not just written for the money, 19 Sep 2005
This review is from: New Spring: A Wheel of Time Prequel (Paperback)
This book is only really worth reading if you've already a devout reader of the Wheel of Time, and have made it to at least book 3 or 4, and preferably much further. Many readers of the series will wonder if Jordan just wrote this for the money, but I truly believe that this wasn't the case: the book is written for a reason; to show us something more of Moiraine and Siuan's quest, and how it has affected their actions before and during the actual Wheel of Time series. Aes Sedai are, to me, rarely palatable, but the Accepted Moiraine and Siuan are far more sympathetic characters than any other I have come across in the White Tower, with less arrogance and a true, but unsickening, friendship. These are traits not frequently found in their characters in the original series, but believable nonetheless. Seeing into the minds of Moiraine and Lan is intriguing, as we don't often get to know their mindset in the other books. Well worth reading, and not just to tide you over until the next installment from The Creator.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not what I expected, 30 Dec 2006
Being a great fan of Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series, I was definitly going to get this.

Then I read the reviews about it and changed my mind I couldn't be bothered.

Then someone bought it for me for Christmas, I can't believe what people have written in the reviews. I think it's really good, very fast paced for Robert Jordan (cue cynical sniggering), and since it's about two characters from whom we don't hear their point of view in the main series, it makes a great story. The story reads like most of the other WoT books but it comes in from a different angle, with all the good bits of the other books (chases, channeling, swordsmanship, and urgency).

In my opinion there isn't another book like it in the series mainly because a lot of action happens across all 300 pages of it, with a lot of depth to the story.

If you loved books 1-3 and got bored at book 5 read this it's great.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 27 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

New Spring: A Wheel of Time Prequel
New Spring: A Wheel of Time Prequel by Robert Jordan (Paperback - 2 Dec 2004)
6.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews