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4.3 out of 5 stars
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4.3 out of 5 stars
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on 10 October 2004
This is a highly readable account of the Rat Pack (Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr, Joey Bishop, Peter Lawford) and their entourage (various Mafia characters, Lauren Bacall, Marilyn Monroe, JFK, et al.). It captures what made the period cool, evokes the atmosphere of Las Vegas at its peak, and goes a long way towards explaining the popularity of these entertainers and their work. It's the kind of book you wolf down in a few sittings, written in a lively, colloquial, funny style. Recommended.
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on 24 October 2000
A riveting expose of the life and times of the Rat Pack and it's interaction with organised crime and crooked politicians. A very stimulating read for all ages, but in particular, for those born between 1940 and 1970 who wish to understand how Las Vegas has become the tourist attraction it is today. Stars, hoodlums and politicians walk into and out of the limelight from time to time. Underlying the book's showbiz nature there are the true signs of the racial tensions amongst the nation's most popular entertainers and politicians, and the desire to use any means to win election to high political office. Despite John Kennedy's subsequent support of human rights and racial equality, this book shows him, and his family for what they... in many peoples eyes remain; gangsters! A book of great research value for any student of the Rat Pack and it's times
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on 10 December 2001
This book is bad for your health. I read it in one sitting with only one toilet break and one food break! THe first 100 or so pages are fantastic and the last 100 or so are almost as good. The book does dip somewhat in the centre pages but what the heck, the best read I've had in years. A worth purchase.
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on 14 September 2005
A great insight into the personalities and era of the rat pack. Many parts of the book provide shocks, especially those on Sinatra who comes across a paranoid bully. Martin was a bit of a lazy sod who didnt break his back to impress anyone. Sammy comes across as a fighter who desperately tried to please everyone but was often ridiculed or hated by many without seemingly doing much wrong. Mr Lawford it seems came into the fold as an entree for Sinatra into the Kennedy fold (he loved people in power) before dumping Lawford when he thought Lawford had double crossed him. And Joey Bishop, who was suprised as anyone else when he joined the fold and was one of the few people who could rib Sinatra without risk of violence!
All in all a fascinating read into an era that seems a long long time ago, but it brings to life and unviels the flawed personalities of these superstars and legends
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on 4 December 1999
This book is essential reading for anyone who has even the remotest interest in the main protagonists of that all too short rule of the Rat Pack. Moreover, it succeeds as a document of Las Vegas, Mob ,and political histories of the era. This is no mean feat in a book as easy and entertaining to read as any of Dino's or Frank's songs were to listen to.
For all those of us who wish we could be like Frank,the effortless way Levy drops the bombshells showing Frank's weaknesses and frailties might just persuade us to change our minds.
A delight to read and revisit,I recommend this book to all. As a bonus,you'll get some feel for Las Vegas when it was a truly glamorous and dangerous town,and not the popcorn-heavy family fun dump it is now.
As a personal recommendation to the likes of Robbie Williams et al: read this book to discover what it really takes to be a real showbiz star and a truly great singer.
Keep Swinging! Thanks, Owen Salisbury
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on 14 August 1999
I loved this book. It covered a fascinating era and confirmed many of the rumours circulating about the influence of the mob. Well written and combining showbiz, politics and crime, a wonderful holiday read. One down side - I can't enjoy Sinatra the way I used to!
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on 7 July 1999
This book is a fascinating, if occasionally slow moving account, of a rivetting part of American history. I came to the book with little actual knowledge of the main characters but came away feeling that I'd got an understanding of the characters - Frank: an egotistical guy who was lonely at heart and just seemed to want a gang around him, Sammy: eager to please everybody, especially Frank and understandably hurt by the years of racial abuse, Dean: his own guy, Peter: slimey creepy Brit with little moral fibre.... This book is a perfect companion to "American Tabloid" by James Elroy in that you start to feel as you read it that you are back in Sixties America. Well worth a read and you can whizz through it in a week or 2.
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on 30 January 2010
I am a great fan of Sinatra and his 'pals'. It was my era. I even saw Sinatra (perhaps his last concert in England) at the London Arena. I also saw his house in Palm Springs when I visited America a few years ago. I thoroughly enjoyed the 'Rat Pack's' antics in my youth. This book brought all of that very much back to life. It was written in a brilliant style that very much captured the Las Vegas cum Sinatra cum Rat Pack atmosphere. It also is quite a serious book in so much as it describes not only the fun side of their lives, but also the darker side of all of them, and eventually the break-up of the Rat Pack. If you are a follower and reader of Sinatra, this will make a great addition to your collection.
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on 4 December 2003
Next to Chuck Berry's autobiography, this is the best book I have read in years. AWESOME.
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on 29 December 2015
Part Vegas history, part biography, part ratpack pen portrait with a dose of political expose and gangster thrills thrown into the mix.

At its strongest in its mini biographies of Sinatra, Martin, Lawford, Bishop and particularly Davis Jr. The middle section of the book mainly covering politics and gangsters I found quite dull and, in places, confusing. The author failed to bring the glitz and glamour of Vegas in the '50s and '60's to the page.

In the acknowledgements, the author says that his initial proposition to his editor/publisher was for a biography of Sammy Davis Jr. I finished the book thinking that that would have made for a better read.
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