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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant!
This book is in the 'Introducing ...' series of 'comic books'. It's excellent. Perhaps the best thing about it is the structured way in which it describes the development of quantum theory. After being introduced to the key scientists, the reader is told about the nineteenth century developments from which quantum theory arose. It emerges that there were three problems...
Published on 7 Oct 2005 by James Bentley

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An interesting introduction to the topic
I found this title rather less accessible than the related titles Introducing Chaosand Introducing Fractal Geometry (Introducing...). This may be because the nature of the topic is inherently more difficult.

The book deals with the development of quantum theory, the structure and behaviour of matter at the atomic level. It provides a useful description of the...
Published on 14 Feb 2009 by Steven Unwin


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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant!, 7 Oct 2005
By 
James Bentley (East Yorkshire, Great Britain) - See all my reviews
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This book is in the 'Introducing ...' series of 'comic books'. It's excellent. Perhaps the best thing about it is the structured way in which it describes the development of quantum theory. After being introduced to the key scientists, the reader is told about the nineteenth century developments from which quantum theory arose. It emerges that there were three problems facing classical physics around the year 1900. These were solved by Max Planck, Albert Einstein and Niels Bohr respectively and, in the process, quantum theory was born. The author deals with these problems and their solutions in detail. I found this to be a very clear approach, which seemed to lay things out in chronological order with everything fitting in to place.

After this the author goes on to describe the further work of Niels Bohr as well as that of Wolfgang Pauli, Louis de Broglie, Max Born, Werner Heisenberg, Erwin Schrodinger and Paul Dirac. Schrodinger's cat and wave-particle duality are described along the way, the theory of QED gets mentioned but is not described, and the book culminates in an account of the EPR paradox, Bell's inequality theorem and the work of Alain Aspect.

Having said all that, this is not an easy book. I don't think it would be possible to write an easy introduction to quantum theory. I had to read it a few times to understand it (and there are still quite a few pages I don't understand), but I learned a lot in the process. There is an amazing amount of information packed into this book and even someone who is scientifically knowledgable would benefit from it. If you know nothing or little about quantum theory, you're not going to find an easier introduction or one so well organised, and even if you only understand half of the book, you'll learn a great deal.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Some background needed, good introduction to personalities, 22 Oct 2001
By 
Chris Beels (New York, NY USA) - See all my reviews
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I thought this book was excellent, and a fun read. I enjoy the format of the "Introducing..." series in general, i.e. the "serious" Graphic Novel. You will need a fairly extensive chemistry/physics background to get the most out of this book, and should be familiar with concepts of classical physics, wave vs. particle behaviours, etc. But even if you're a bit rusty, as I was, I thought it was very interesting putting names and (silly) faces to the founding fathers of Quantum mechanics and going through the history of each of their contributions.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good intro. An interesting layout., 3 April 2006
By 
Michael Jay (Berks, UK) - See all my reviews
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This being the first book of the 'introducing...' series i have read, i was pleasently suprised by the comic-book-esque layout the author has provided. This unique layout allowed for many an amusing and often helpful illustrations;- not unlike the illustration of schrodinger's atom - a three dimensional vibrating system.
The book, at the authors' own admission, focuses more on how the ideas of quantum theory developed rather then how the theory itself is applied. It is for this reason i have rated the book at 4 stars. I feel slightly let down that the book did not continue to explain the application or the many possibilities quantum theory allows. It is however an excellent well-written book with a solid structured flow, which i would recommend to anyone if they wish to gain a basic understanding of quantum theory.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The ultimate crash course..., 6 Dec 2005
By A Customer
Don't buy this book if you want to be an expert on the subject, but do buy it to get to grips with the major issues surrounding Quantun theory, as well as the key players that kicked the whole thing off. This book neatly illustrates how it was founded and the attempts made to understand the experimental findings - as well as the battle between some of the greatest minds every to exist over the subject. Highly informative and well presented. Such a complex subject will never be understood by everyone, if anyone at all... ever, but this does a good job to showing you the 'basics'.
A well earned 5 stars.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An interesting introduction to the topic, 14 Feb 2009
By 
Steven Unwin "Steve Unwin" (Preston, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Introducing Quantum Theory: A Graphic Guide (Paperback)
I found this title rather less accessible than the related titles Introducing Chaosand Introducing Fractal Geometry (Introducing...). This may be because the nature of the topic is inherently more difficult.

The book deals with the development of quantum theory, the structure and behaviour of matter at the atomic level. It provides a useful description of the key players involved and the interaction as ideas are developed almost like the passing of the baton in a relay. An idea being challenged, added to, discarded or built upon as physicists throughout the 20th century and particularly its first half, struggle to build their understanding of matter. The description follows the various ideas, each of which provided a step along the process of learning, some to be discarded as thinking moved on, others still part of our current understanding.

Though some of the detail, even in this brief primer, may be a little difficult to fathom, at the heart of our understanding of the nature of matter are two key ideas, perhaps two design principles that appear to underpin everything. These ideas are uncertainty and connectedness.

I was intrigued by the description of work on understanding the nature of light, which in some ways behaves as a wave, and in some ways behaves as a particle. The resolution of this paradox is that it becomes either wave like or particle like, depending on how we choose to see it. The observer causes it to exist in that form. As Niels Bohr put it,
"Whether an object behaves as a wave or a particle depends on your choice of apparatus for looking at it"

As for connectedness, some of the mathematics suggests the idea of non-locality, that all matter is connected. Interaction does not diminish with distance and acts simultaneously without crossing space. Matter on one side of the universe, knows all about matter on the other side of the universe and they act together.

The validity and consequences of this amazing idea are still being explored, but it raises fascinating questions about our concepts of connectedness, and our apparent preference to dissect our world and avoid the realities of a jagged edged world of chaos.

This is an interesting little book, the ideas of which compliment those in Introducing Chaos and Introducing Fractal Geometry, but may perhaps be the least immediately relevant of the three for those seeking to extend their thinking.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars You'll love it if you're a scientist, hate it if you're not, 18 Oct 2010
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This review is from: Introducing Quantum Theory: A Graphic Guide (Paperback)
I enjoy reading popular science and am familiar with the work of Brian Greene, Stephen Hawking, Simon Singh, etc Reading these authors has sparked my interest in quantum theory as it is a fascinating subject, yet slightly ignored and I found it so difficult to find an understandable introduction to quantum theory. I thought Introducing Quantum Theory would be just the thing, however, all it has done is confused me more than ever. It goes over some of the most basic assumptions of the basic concepts involved in quantum theory but never really ties anything together. It also gives you all sorts of terribly technical information which I simply did not understand as they were not explained in enough detail. Getting a graphic novel to explain quantum theory was a very bad idea. This is not a subject that can be explained with a few pictures and a few statements...I am off to search for a proper introduction to this subject which can shed some light on it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting book, 11 Aug 2007
By 
P. S. Saxton - See all my reviews
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A good introduction to Quantum Theory. I found the book gave a good overview of the subject, particularly useful if you are studying Quantum physics for the first time and want a quick intro to tie all the bits together.

The format of the book is a bit different, with lots of pictures and cartoons, but I found this added to an already good book.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An excellent intro, 15 May 2006
By 
I. D. Miller "ian_miller6" (Solihull) - See all my reviews
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This is the first book I've read in the "Introducing" series; I thoroughly enjoyed it. The topic of Quantum Physics is something I've always had a layman's interest in, and this book managed to pull together the little bits I knew into an overall picture.

The comic style format is light-hearted but doesn't detract from the overall content.

One criticism if I can is that some of the mathematical formulaes left me baffled, and I have a Maths degree! However the accompanying narrative generally explained some of the "hard sums".
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Did not really help me get to grips with subject, 6 Sep 1999
By A Customer
I was struggling with the science involved in Richard Rhodes: The Making of the Atomic Bomb and wanted an introduction or beginners guide to quantum theory. Having read the excellent Beginners Guide to the Arabs and Israel by Ron David, I was aware of how useful this approach can be in giving a crash course or introduction into a subject. I was therefore pleased when I discovered, in this book, what seemed like the ideal introduction. Unfortunately I was very disappointed.
The authors have obviously tried hard to use the established "Beginners Guide" format to present the subject but the extent of science and history they have tried to cover is just too broad. Despite having a scientific education, and background involving 14 years in research, I really struggled trying to understand the scientific concepts as the authors presented them. (I learnt much more from The Making of The Atomic Bomb.)
I am quite surprised that any proof reading of this book prior to launch did not identify similar criticism. Maybe it did but the book was published regardless? Maybe I'm too thick for this subject??
As I've said, I've seen that this approach can be an excellent way of presenting information, but unfortunately, in this case, it didn't work (for me). Really I'd only give it one crown, I threw an extra one in for the authors' obvious efforts. Publishers would get no crowns for weak or no proof reading for "layman understandability"!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Quantum Theory., 25 Mar 2013
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This review is from: Introducing Quantum Theory: A Graphic Guide (Paperback)
This book leads you though the history of all the Physicists making there theory's and discovery's in a very fun clever way able to brows and then resume later with out having to under stand some of maths involved.
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Introducing Quantum Theory: A Graphic Guide
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