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31 Reviews
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21 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A males dream come true?
Imagine waking up one morning and finding out you are the very last man alive on Earth. Billions of women and your the only hope for the survival of the human race. Sounds like a dream come true, endless late nights and not a headache in sight....Right.....Wrong!

Speaking totally from a male perspective it really does seem like heaven on earth, but throw in...
Published on 6 Nov 2006 by D. Francis

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Decent Start
When reading a long graphic novel series you have to usually remember that for the most part they get better as they go along. The first volume will lay the groundwork and this will often lead many to say that a comic is boring.

Y The Last Man Vol 1 is good enough to make you want to read the next one but has some serious flaws. For starters women are portrayed...
Published on 27 Jun 2008 by Gary Samaden


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12 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars unmanned - unparalleled, 8 Jan 2004
This review is from: Y: The Last Man Vol. 1 - Unmanned (Paperback)
I recently recieved my copy of Y, knowing very little about this comic I was quite excited, a little apprehensive and very curious as to how the subject of being the last man on earth would be tackled. I honestly did not expect what I saw, the comic plays out from start to finish like a film with non-linear narrative, even the writers and artists credits are displayed in a hollywood blockbuster way. With so many superhero comics being converted to big screen with mixed success, it felt so fresh to see a comic do almost the opposite. Needless to say I finished this comic very quickly and was left desperate for more. A true mark of a good story for me is one that has me thinking what if? the next morning in the shower. To conclude this comes highly highly recommended.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A novel that will keep in your mind for life, 6 April 2009
By 
Ricardo Cordeiro "Sr. Cordeiro" (Lisbon, Portugal) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is a review of all the series, not just the first book.

I've started to read Y based on it's premise: I've always been attracted to post-apocalyptic fiction and the "last male on earth" seemed a different approach to the genre.

I liked it immediately but never tough of it as a masterpiece, only a well done and entertaining comic. But when I approached the end of the series I started to look at it in a different way. As the various answers to the plot were revealed I kept reminding details on the first issues that seemed unimportant at the time but gained a new weight.

The plot is dense and full of metaphors yet presented on a simple way, a good example of a story with various layers of interpretation. It's the kind of book in witch you connect to the characters and feels more like an experience than just a book.

The last issue lets one experiment mix of feelings and when it came to the end I've become 10 or 20 minutes just reflecting on the whole story to realize that this is a modern masterpiece.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great idea, perfectly executed, 31 Jan 2014
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I first read a chapter of Y the Last Man via the Comixology app on my phone and was hooked. So glad I downloaded this issue after that first initial read as it doesn't disappoint. If anything it gets better!

Love the writing, the ideas and the artwork. Couldn't recommend it enough. Just trying to limit myself to only foreboding one volume a month so I don't skint myself!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Y I'm not alone, 10 Jan 2014
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So reading this book in my local bar and i am approached by a member of staff to discuss the book, 5 minutes later and no spoiler but a good chat.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars quite enjoyable, 10 Dec 2013
This is my Girlfriend's favourite graphic novel and has her favourite comic book character in it (agent 355). It didn't take me long to get interested or finish!

Looks like it is going to be a great series to get involved in.
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10 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good but not Perfect, 5 Sep 2005
By 
A. Ross (Washington, DC) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Y: The Last Man Vol. 1 - Unmanned (Paperback)
I missed all the hype about this series, and just happened upon the trade paperback at the library. It's good, very solid storytelling and art that grabs you, but is perhaps not quite as amazing as the many gushing reviews I've since read make it out to be. The premise, as the title says, is that some kind of plague spontaneously kills every male on earth at the same instant -- except a 20something slacker named Yorick and his monkey Ampersand. For some reason, this event also happens to sever his lame over-the-phone marriage proposal to his Playboy-proportioned girlfriend who is hiking around the Australian outback. Scenes of chaos from around the world are shown, and then we jump forward two months to find Yorick in Washington, D.C. trying to track down his Congresswoman mother.
Meanwhile, the mysterious nappy-headed Agent 355 is rousting the Secretary of Agriculture from her bed to inform her that she is now the President. Agent 355 was shown previously in Jordan, recovering something called the Amulet of Helene from around the neck of a female doctor, a plot point that does not resurface in this book, but undoubtedly will prove key later on. Another unexplained plotline involves a gun-totin', liptick-wearin', female Israeli army officer intent on invading the surrounding Arab nations in the post plague chaos and the mysterious person in Washington, DC who contacts her about Yorick. But most of the book is about Yorick and the question of what his role is to be in this post-man world. It seems there's an expert in cloning up in Boston who might be able to analyze his blood and figure out some sort of solution. Agent 355 is tasked with getting him up there safely, since he's arguably the most valuable item on the planet.
This is complicated by a growing movement of self-styled Amazons who celebrate the removal of men from the face of the Earth. When they get wind of Yorick, they send out a death squad to eliminate him -- a death squad which just happens to include his missing sister (an unnecessary bit of melodrama). They're totally over-the-top, reminiscent of some gang out of the film The Warriors, and their trademark is that they surgically remove one of their breasts! Despite the post-holocaust premise, there's plenty of sly humor to lighten things up. For example, in the background of one panel, Yorick's monkey is furiously hugging a teddy bear. Another example is the place women have selected as the memorial site for their men -- the Washington Monument. The straightforward artwork and paneling is appropriate for the subject matter, which is so story driven.
And yet, much as I liked the book, there are plenty of missteps. For example, Yorick seems awfully oblivious to his own importance and repeatedly puts himself in stupid situations. The Amazons also seem far too extreme--the breast removal as symbolic gang badge is silly, and some of them carry bows and arrows in a kind of lame nod to Mad-Max, as if there aren't guns all over the place. There's also a laughable showdown between the wives of dead Republican leaders and Yorick's mother on the steps of the White House. It also seems a little ridiculous (and possibly sexist) that the infrastructure has apparently totally collapsed without men.
The book does a great job of setting up a potentially interesting story that cuts across genres (horror, science-fiction, thriller), but this first volume is all questions and no answers. Reading it without volume two on hand is like watching the first episode of a mini-series and then having to wait a week for the next episode to figure out if you really like it. I'll definitely seek out the next.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An unmitigated joy to read!, 26 Nov 2010
This is easily the best storyline I've read in a long time. Engaging, funny, well paced and it never feels like it's treading water. The characters are fully developed and because of this the final books in the series really pack an emotional punch. Can't recommend this highly enough.
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5 of 17 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The Emperor's New Clothes, 21 Jun 2012
By 
Steffen S. (Copenhagen, Denmark) - See all my reviews
The storys basic setup is fairly original, provided you never heard of Mary Shelley, or the 1924 film based on her book, or the remakes in 1964 and 1999. In this edition of the tale (the most absurd, yet), all male mammals on the planet suddenly die, coughing and weeping blood, within the same minute, boom.
All, except for the main character, his pet monkey, and a couple of male astronauts in space at the time of the event.
I guess you'd love to learn that there's some ingenious explanation for something so incredible, but there isn't. There are some suggested theories presented along the way, the one more ludicrous than the one before it.
If you know squat about chromosomes, physiology or genetics, the lack of a convincing natural explanation for such an absurd event should come as no big surprise to you, either.
You might be surprised to learn that the tale has no convincing explanation AT ALL, though.
To boot, the narrative universe is apparently not a supernatural one, beyond what is presented as cultic superstition, and what admittedly seems to be a supernatural propensity for stupidity and poorly motivated action in most of the main characters.

How about a female genetical scientist clever enough to pull off cloning, but daftly irrational and superstitious enough to think that all male mammals died due to a failed human clone being born? (Even if it did all happen in the same few minutes)
I could go on, but for the sake of those who still want to read this series, I will limit myself to say that the male protagonist is pretty consistent in his (apparently high) degree of naive retardation and insensible attitude, and that people in this series incredibly often choose plainly ludicrous courses of action.

One star out of 5 in recognition of the nice drawings.
So much for the tale itself.
________________
Onwards to the phenomenon of the authors audacious style of storytelling.
I must admit I'm fascinated by mr. Vaughans ability to get away with writing thinly veiled nonsensical mystery tales to popular and critical acclaim. This guy is one clever and false 'talor' if there ever was one.
(He was also one of the writers of the tv-series Lost)

As far as I'm concerned, the fact that the guy who wrote this empty dazzle wins an Eisner Award, while Mike Carey has to settle for a measly nomination for his masterpiece series Lucifer, is a mystery that can best be explained by Mr. Vaughan having in fact made a pact with the devil... Not to write really good tales, mind, but to be a great success by simply seducing his audience into thinking that there must be some madly ingenious explanations for the plot mysteries[read: holes] lurking around the next turn of the tale.

In truth, it seems, Mr. Vaughan can rarely, if ever, be bothered to knit together substantial and sensible plots. He may even think it part of the fun to spin his tales with the most gaping plot holes possible, preferrably avoiding making sense at all. While I guess I could somewhat appreciate the gag and skillfulness of such deceptive seduction from a writers perspective, by my sense of justice, I'm also outraged that people seem to eat it up without even seeing it for the hollow fabulation that it is, and that his simple ruse will even earn him awards for such superficial artifice, while guys like Carey just don't get the full recognition they deserve.
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7 of 24 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Nothing special, 8 Mar 2006
This review is from: Y: The Last Man Vol. 1 - Unmanned (Paperback)
This book has a great start - one day all the male mammals (including humans) die coughing up blood. The cause of their death is unknown. A young man named Yorick and his pet monkey somehow survive, and the book is about what happens to Yorick afterwards.
I enjoyed this book, enough to have asked the library where I got it from to buy volume two, and to pay a pound towards the cost. It's nothing special though: the writing and artwork is average to fair, and 128 pages of comic book doesn't last me very long.
As one of the other reviewers said, reading this is like watching the first episode of a TV series. It has promise, but I will have to read volume two to see whether I am going to stick with it.
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Oops I made a mistake!, 27 Dec 2011
By 
Ms. Elise Hey - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Y: The Last Man Vol. 1 - Unmanned (Paperback)
I asked my neice what she wanted for Christmas, and she said "The Last Man" - so I ordered The Last Man, Volume 1 - only to find, when it arrived, that she already had this volume, so I returned it and ordered Volume 2. It did arrive in excellent condition, and very quickly so I am completely happy with the service.
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Y: The Last Man Vol. 1 - Unmanned
Y: The Last Man Vol. 1 - Unmanned by Brian K. Vaughan (Paperback - 24 July 2003)
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