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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sick and Disturbing...but Great!
The synopsis for this book details how it was considered profane and obscene by the original late 18th century readers, how there was outrage at it, with most books from this period, we as modern day readers can't undrstand why the old readers would react in such a way. With Matthew Lewis' the monk it is entirely understandable.
The plot revolves largely around a few...
Published on 3 April 2006 by Stev White

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars An OK read
In today's age, this story is a bit trite and the speech in it very dated. However, if you read it remembering the year it was written it was the sort of book to cause a stir - murder, rape, and devilry in an monastic setting.
Published 8 months ago by Y


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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sick and Disturbing...but Great!, 3 April 2006
By 
Stev White (Cambridge, England) - See all my reviews
The synopsis for this book details how it was considered profane and obscene by the original late 18th century readers, how there was outrage at it, with most books from this period, we as modern day readers can't undrstand why the old readers would react in such a way. With Matthew Lewis' the monk it is entirely understandable.
The plot revolves largely around a few weeks in the life of Ambrosio, a monk in Madrid who has lived for the last thirty years without having commited even the slightest sin. Then, a woman disguised as a male monk infiltrates the monastry with Ambrosio in, proffesses her love for him, and evetually seduces him. From then on, Ambrosio gives into each sin and each temptation that presents itself to him, resulting in him starting to rape and murder, before eventually selling his soul to the devil.
The novel is written in a very graphic manner, and is very disturbing, not a book for the faint hearted, but no matter how sick and disturbing it gets, it remains a compelling read throughout, and you will find yourself wiling away hours at a time to progress through this rivetting read. I would reccommend it as one of the finest pieces of Gothic fiction ever written.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful.. in a very dark way!, 25 Nov 2010
This review is from: The Monk (Wordsworth Mystery & Supernatural) (Tales of Mystery & the Supernatural) (Paperback)
Of course, as everyone will know, many segments of this book are considered by some to be very unpleasant, and I admit that some segments of the book were quite disturbing. But do not let the controversy that shrouds this novel take away from it's brilliance! Firstly, the language of the book is extremely impressive. In the modern day, language is unfortunately overlooked, people preferring to keep it simple and to the point. And so reading this novel opened my eyes to a whole new world of vocabulary, and really showed me the wonders of the English language. As a student studying English at A level, it has benefited me greatly. The story itself, albeit starting rather slowly, ( as I read the rather confusing first chapter I started contemplating putting it down, but luckily decided to carry on )is absolute genius. The exploration of the relationships between characters, and the inner conflicts of certain characters ( particularly Ambrosio himself ) were a delight to read. The book seems to me an exploration of the conflict between good and evil, and how keeping a darker side suppressed for too long can end in disasters and tragedies. The greatest surprise for me, as someone expecting an entire novel of darkness and despair, was the pleasant epilogue to the lives of Agnes and Don Raymond. It seems that even after horrendous atrocities, and indescribable sufferings, there is still happiness that can be found, which I thought was beautiful. Of course, do not take this to mean that the book is full of smiles and happy endings! But if you are to read it for anything, read it for it's encapsulating story and Mathew Lewis' confident, amazing grasp of the English language. A true masterpiece!
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52 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The most influential novel of Gothic horror, 31 Jan 2003
By 
Daniel Jolley "darkgenius" (Shelby, North Carolina USA) - See all my reviews
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The Monk is perhaps the most significant and certainly the most controversial of the Gothic novels of the late 18th century. Amazingly, its author, nineteen-year-old Matthew Lewis, wrote the novel in a period of only six weeks. Although inspired by the work of Ann Radcliffe (among other Gothic writers), Lewis goes far beyond the sensibilities of his predecessors and does not choose to explain away the supernatural events fuelling this inflammatory novel. The Monk is a tale of human evil in its most vile form; the unspeakable acts described in these pages are committed by the supposedly most devout individuals in society. The Catholic Church was incensed with the novel's publication, and it is actually quite remarkable that The Monk was published at all and that its author faced nothing more dire than censorship and indignant protest as a consequence of it.
Ambrosio is the most celebrated, revered monk in Madrid (in the era of the infamous Spanish Inquisition)-his sermons attract crowds far too large to gain admittance to the sanctuary, and everyone holds him up as a veritable saint walking the earth. His fall from grace is precipitous indeed. Secretly, Ambrosio is vain and proud, blissfully assured of his own near-perfection. At the first temptation of lust, however, this holy man reveals himself to be the ultimate hypocrite, giving in rather easily to the type of desire he rails against each Sunday. After learning that his friend Rosario is in fact a lovely woman in disguise named Matilda, he revels in the love she declares for him and quickly becomes her secret lover. Quickly and ever more thoroughly consumed by his new-found passion and carnal lasciviousness, he grows tired of the ever-willing Matilda and turns his perverted eye toward the sweet and wholly innocent young Antonia. Through the witchcraft of Matilda, he comes to consort with demons in the sacred crypts underneath the abbey itself, giving up his morality and piety in the blind pursuit of actions worse than mere rape.
Ambrosio is not the only hypocritical, secretly sinful church official in Madrid, however. The prioress of the convent bordering the abbey is a sickeningly cruel and spiteful agent of perfidy herself. When she discovers that Agnes, one of her novitiates, is pregnant, she is so mortified at the impending shame this fact will bring down upon her and the convent that she resorts to the most barbaric of punishments for the poor and pitiable young lady. While her crimes do not quite exceed those of Ambrosio, the devastating consequences of her sinful acts result in long-lasting, deeply grievous repercussions. Justice is not blind in the end to such willful violators of God's laws.
The novel takes a while to really come together. After seeing Ambrosio in his publicly sanctimonious guise and watching his pitiful descent into the passions and lusts inspired by Matilda, we spend a great deal of time becoming acquainted with Antonia, Agnes, and the gentlemen who love them and will eventually fight bravely to try and save them both physically and morally from their sad fates. The story of the Bleeding Nun apparition is an important part of this section of the book and gives the reader his first real introduction to the supernatural aspects of the story. It is almost possible to forget about Ambrosio completely for a time; when he returns to the story, however, he commits unspeakable acts and profanes the very name of the God he supposedly serves in such excess that he earns a permanent spot in the annals of literature's most despicable villains.
It is in the crypts, among the moldering corpses of the dead, that the most blasphemous acts take place. Antonia's fate is quite horrible, but it is actually Agnes' tale of woe that takes the reader to the most horrific of extremes. Just when the worst seems to be over, we learn in graphic detail the almost unimaginable extent of the ordeal suffered by Agnes and her innocent child-the tale is quite gruesome even by today's standards, almost unimaginably so by those of Lewis' own time. The suffering of the innocent Agnes and Antonia is, in my opinion, unparalleled in the realm of Gothic horror.
Even some critics who are less than found of the Gothic horror genre have embraced this novel, partly because it does distinguish itself from the more Romantic writings of an author such as Ann Radcliffe. As such, it seems less pretentious and much more visceral than the typical Gothic tome. Lewis holds nothing back in presenting his portrayal of evil in the hearts of men and women. There is a love story aspect to the events surrounding Agnes and Antonia, but the author does not indulge in flowery descriptions of love, nor does he concern himself with rapturous expositions on the beauty of nature. There is very little of beauty to be found in these pages at all, and what innocence exists is ultimately lost at the hands of corrupted servants of God. With such complexity underlying the plot, The Monk is open to a number of interpretations, and its microscopic portrayal of evil's power to overcome the best of men and women continues to fascinate and leave a lasting impression on one generation of readers after another. Even in our own time, The Monk is more than capable of shocking the reader with its unbridled revelations.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars just awesome, 24 Jun 2006
By 
John Egbe (Atlanta,GA, USA) - See all my reviews
Written by Matthew Lewis during a short period of ten short weeks when he was just nineteen, "The Monk" proved to be a controversial novel at the time that it was written. Faith, deception, loyalty, sorcery, murder, Satanism, incest, rape, ghosts, and the inquisition gave the novel the popularity it has retained until today. Even though its plot made the novel controversial when it was published in 1796 to the point where it as held to be blasphemous and resulted to censorship, Lewis nevertheless gained in popularity.

The story is basically about Ambrosio, who as an enfant was found at the doors of the abbey, stirring talks that he was a divine-sent child. He grew up to become an ostensibly pious and deeply revered Abbot of the Capuchin monastery in Madrid, a fit in holiness that aroused the resentment of the devil who decides to plot his fall. The devil plotted the fall through the working of a young female who disguised and became a novice under the tutelage of Ambrioso, the immaculate monk. Ambrioso's fall is plotted through out the later stages of the novel as his fight with the deep passions of his body, the machinations of the devil and his attempts at redemption. Anti-Catholic in nature, this Gothic classic is perhaps the best in its genre. I am certain the author enjoyed every moment while he was writing it because the story flowed all the way through to the end. A recommended classic.

Also recommended: THE USURPER AND OTHER STORIES, THE MYSTERIES OF UDOLPHO, DISCIPLES OF FORTUNE, THE UNION MOUJIK
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Short climaxes, rather than long anticipation", 27 Feb 2008
By 
Nicholas Casley (Plymouth, Devon, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is of the Oxford World's Classics edition of Matthew Lewis's one-hit wonder of a novel, "The Monk", although Lewis did go on to be a very successful playwright. Written in 1794 when he was only nineteen years' old, Lewis may have predicted the storm of outrage that his novel would initiate, when he wrote almost halfway through it, "To enter the lists of literature is wilfully to expose yourself to the arrows of neglect, ridicule, envy, and disappointment. Whether you write well or ill, be assured that you will not escape from blame; ..."

After reading Ann Radcliffe's long and somewhat ponderous, but admittedly well-written and dreamy "Mysteries of Udolpho", "The Monk" brought a breath of fresh air into my experience of reading late-eighteenth century gothic novels. Lewis's short and brisk sentences aid quickness of thought and action, and there is often no time to sit and take in the air before the reader is taken off to the next scene in this saga of blasphemy, incest, rape, and murder. Or, as Emma McEvoy of London University puts it in her introduction, Lewis's book is "a work which enjoys short climaxes, rather than long anticipation." This is probably why he went on to write such popular plays.

But whereas Radcliffe in her work would ultimately find rational explanations for all the supposed causes of fear and suspicion, Lewis revels in the truth of the supernatural. The novel is replete with dark and sinister designs and dealing with spirits is the route for their fulfilment. This is tolerable for the reader because the tale is set within the unreal milieu of the gothic drama - and, of course, setting it in the context of deeply-catholic, old-world Spain also helps!

I thought I knew how the novel would pan out and end from clues hidden within the very first chapters, with hints given about the mysterious family background of the monk and with details dropped in conversation in the church about the family history of Elvira. But I was both right and wrong, and without giving the plot away I cannot elaborate any further. But at what the opening scene does not hint is the long meandering journey taken to reach the end, nor at the excesses experienced along the way. There are some stories within stories within stories, when we hear of the legend of the Bleeding Nun, as the action shifts to Germany from the hot and humid streets of Madrid. I say `hot and humid', but there is very little descriptive element to the novel; more is focussed on the action and plot.

There are some factual errors in the writing. Lewis was clearly unaware of differences between monks and friars, for example, or if he did know, he did not care too much. Equally there are some narrative problems too: for example, one moment Matilda (impersonating a male novice) is lying in her/his cell on her/his deathbed in the monastery in front of monks who are praying for her delivery from death, and the next Matilda's golden hair is "pouring itself" over her lover's chest. She must have had a voluminous cowl to hide all that hair!

There is a certain laddish humour in the writing: for instance, "She was wise enough to hold her tongue. As this is the only instance known of a woman's ever having done so, it was judged worthy to be recorded here." And Lorenzo de Medina, Don Christoval and Raymond de las Cisternas are all young blades about town, with an eye for a pretty woman.

In her introduction, Emma McEvoy explains how novels at the time were supposed to inculcate virtue, not vice, but that some contemporary reviewers ignored morality altogether and just praised it as a good read. She mentions that the owner of a circulating library " `underscored all the naughty passages' so that her young female readers would know which parts to avoid." She goes on to explain Lewis's background and how his novel fits the conventions of the gothic form, except that "It seems as if Lewis is determined to wreak vengeance on the unbelievably virtuous characters of other novelists."

This edition includes the usual standard extras that one comes to expect from Oxford World's Classics: the note on the text, the select bibliography, a chronology of the author, and explanatory notes. Some of these latter, however, are a little odd: "Knight of Mount (A)Etna" (p.26) would seem quite self-explanatory; "natural philosophy" (p.267) was the contemporary term for science rather then alchemy; and, yes, I think we worked out for ourselves that the "Grand Inquisitor" (p.422) would be "the official who presided at the Inquisition."

As with all reprints of classic works of literature, I recommend that the so-called introduction (which is really more of a commentary) is best read after the novel.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars About as Gothic as Gothic can be..., 1 Sep 2010
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This review is from: The Monk (Wordsworth Mystery & Supernatural) (Tales of Mystery & the Supernatural) (Paperback)
Firstly I will start off by saying that this particular edition of The Monk by Wordsworth Classics, whilst it has a hideous and slightly pixelated cover, is a steal at under 3! Although it has no explanatory notes like the Penguin or Oxford Classics editions, the price alone is worth the buy if you're short on cash.

The book itself is superb, and the clearest example of the Gothic tradition after Walpole's classic. It was with Matthew Lewis that the "Hammer Horror" cliches of shadowy crypts, ghosts, thwarted lovers and gruesome devilry were truly propelled into an accepted genre; this is a world away from the slow, methodically-paced work of Ann Radcliffe that lavishes in the sublime. The prose is fast-paced and seems extremely modern in style for a book written in 1795, and although it is overtly melodramatic in places (making great use of the exclamation mark) it is still perfectly legible to modern readers.

The plot (as is often proclaimed) runs along the lines of Faust, with the titular monk Ambrosio being driven to temptation by the mysterious and possibly Satanic Matilda, before heading for his wild obsession to deflower the innocent Antonia. It is clear to see how Victor Hugo could have been inspired by the character of Ambrosio for his portrayal of Claude Frollo in Notre-Dame de Paris, the devout clergyman driven to break his vows with lust. However, Lewis soon shifts the focus away from Ambrosio; the centre of the novel is taken up by a very lengthy account given by a marquis, an account that could be a novel in itself and which involves the famous Bleeding Nun episode, cases of mistaken identities and tragic love. However, whilst in most cases this "story-within-a-story" technique ought to distract from the overall work, Lewis is able to weave all the separate narratives together in a way that leaves the reader satisfied (three stories for the price of one).

And, of course, a review of The Monk could not be written without comparing it to its fellow Gothic novels. I mentioned Ann Radcliffe earlier: coincidentally, The Mysteries of Udolpho and The Monk were published just two years apart, the former being in 1794. Whilst Lewis's work draws obvious parallels with Radcliffe's, there is something more gripping and enticing about The Monk; any lengthy descriptions go not to the sublime, but to the supernatural and the horrific. Walpole's Castle of Otranto, "the first Gothic novel", is much more dreamlike and murky due to the fact that the Gothic genre wasn't yet formed, and is more of a challenge to modern readers due to the lack of speech marks and paragraph breaks. But The Monk, despite its date, belongs aesthetically in the later, 19th century tradition of the Gothic such as Frankenstein and the stories of Poe, where the focus is more on the psychological horror of events rather than the disquietude of the character's surroundings. However, this is all just the opinion I gained from reading The Monk and comparing it to the rest of the Gothic.

Even if you find the Gothic too operatic and over-the-top I highly recommend this book, purely on the basis of how rewarding it is. It's fascinating to see where most of the modern "horror" cliches originated, and it's a fine addition to English literary history.

Also, I might seem in this review as if I'm knocking Miss Radcliffe and her style of writing - I like her really!
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars a fine gothic novel perfectly suited to winter nights., 28 Dec 2002
By 
I asked for this book because I read a thumb-nail review describing it as "the most gothic of its genre". While not a fan of the historical novels, I really like the idea of gothic fiction - the swooning, the alarming twists of fate, insane coincidences and secret passages. "The Monk" offered plenty of these.
Censured soon after its publication, its author an MP, and admired by none other than the Marquis de Sade, the book acquired an unparalleled reputation for raciness of the highest order. Naturally, it lags behind today's foil fronted blockbusters. The story concerns the comings and goings surrounding adjacent monastery and convent in Madrid and the various back-stories of those associated with inhabitants and extra mural players. Lascivious monks, repressed nuns and gallant aristos all sound a wee bit cheap, but it's all done so well. The language is very much of its era, but the motoring plot and adeptly juxtaposed accounts are sufficient to keep even the most ardent archaism-basher happy. For an 18th century classic, it is very readable. Lewis was also a playwright, and so it follows that the narrative is very rich visually, playing, as successful gothic novels should, with all the senses.
The most obvious comparison to be drawn is with "The Name of the Rose". Umberto Eco's ornate medieval detective story weighed heavily on me - with it's sheer bulk of pagination and knowing-style, I found it a frustrating read. "The Monk" however, had a real lightness of touch and despite magpie like borrowings from European literary traditions and sleaziness, its flair and structure knock "The Name of the Rose" into a cocked hat.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More Sensibility than Sense!, 29 Mar 2013
By 
Duncan R. McKeown "Mozartian" (Norwich, Norfolk UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Monk (Wordsworth Mystery & Supernatural) (Tales of Mystery & the Supernatural) (Paperback)
I would like to come at this book in a different way from the other reviewers. This is not because I disagree with most of those reviews: the book is a great read, an astonishing creation from a extremely precocious 19 year old! The language is beautiful...even if the subject matter is sensational in the extreme. Doubtless it is one of the greatest of all gothic novels; but if I can't add a different insight, I might as well let the other reviews speak for me.
No, the thing that I found most remarkable about 'The Monk' was the way this work tells us so much about the time of its writing. Some works of art (not always the greatest) are psychologically revealing about their own age...and this one is in spades.
Lewis wrote his novel in a few weeks in late 1794, in the Netherlands. He seems to have been attached, in a diplomatic capacity, to The Duke of York's ill-fated expedition against the French Revolutionary army. This, remember, was the year of the culmination of 'The Terror', and the collapse of the enlightenment project with the fall of Robespierre. We are on the cusp of two eras, the optimistic rationalism of the French 'Philosophes' is giving way to an inward-looking, apolitical romanticism; a development Goya noted, and satirised in his 1799 'Caprichos' print 'The Sleep of Reason Brings Forth Monsters'.
The novel is deeply divided in this way, both 'Sense and Sensibility' in the same author (as opposed to its division between two sisters a la Jane Austen). In the jargon of our age we could call this cognitive dissonance, I suppose. I should add that this is not a criticism...I found it fascinating, and very revealing about the uncertainties of this explosive era. This is yet another good reason to read this book, especially if you have an interest in the history of ideas.
What do I mean by cognitive dissonance? Well, a major theme in 'The Monk' is the protestant/enlightenment attack on the 'superstition', of the Spanish Catholic Church which essentially clouds the fates of the lovers Raymond and Agnes. Lorenzo and Raymond never fail to repeatedly hammer this point home. Lewis is a firm disciple of Voltaire here, and the Spaniard Goya. On the other hand, Lewis then proceeds to bring forth a bevy of monsters. He, and his characters, revel in the older superstitions of witchcraft, devil-worship and ghost stories...which turn out not to be superstitions at all...but palpable truth! Here we are back in the early seventeenth century mindscape of James the First and Shakespeare's Macbeth...and of course, in the Spanish context, Tirso de Molina's Don Juan. So prayers for the intercession of the saints are futile...but ghosts, and demons (even Lucifer himself!) can be conjured up and there is thus little protection from them!
The impact of current events (and contemporary theatrical works) is a persistent undertone. I doubt that the scene of the attack on the convent could have been quite so convincing without the recent anti-clerical excesses of the revolutionaries still fresh in Lewis' consciousness, and defy anyone to read these disturbing pages without suffering the occasional frisson! The incident with the banditi in the Alsatian woods clearly references Schiller's sensational proto-romantic play of 1781, 'Die Rauber'. Agnes' escape from chains is a borrowing from the fashionable French Revolutionary 'rescue' opera genre...doubtless influenced by the fall of the Bastille, and culminating a few years later in Beethoven's 'Fidelio'. Added to this intoxicating mix is the clear influence of De Sade's sexual politics (no wonder he appreciated this novel!) A witches' brew indeed...a work of genius, arguably, but made more potent by those heady and turbulent times.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Plain awesome, 22 Feb 2013
By 
Pius (Amsterdam, The Netherlands) - See all my reviews
Written by Matthew Lewis during a short period of ten short weeks when he was just nineteen, "The Monk" proved to be a controversial novel at the time that it was written. Faith, deception, loyalty, sorcery, murder, Satanism, incest, rape, ghosts, and the inquisition gave the novel the popularity it has retained until today. Even though its plot made the novel controversial when it was published in 1796 to the point where it as held to be blasphemous and resulted to censorship, Lewis nevertheless gained in popularity.

The story is basically about Ambrosio, who as an enfant was found at the doors of the abbey, stirring talks that he was a divine-sent child. He grew up to become an ostensibly pious and deeply revered Abbot of the Capuchin monastery in Madrid, a fit in holiness that aroused the resentment of the devil who decides to plot his fall. The devil plotted the fall through the working of a young female who disguised and became a novice under the tutelage of Ambrioso, the immaculate monk. Ambrioso's fall is plotted through out the later stages of the novel as his fight with the deep passions of his body, the machinations of the devil and his attempts at redemption. Anti-Catholic in nature, this Gothic classic is perhaps the best in its genre. I am certain the author enjoyed every moment while he was writing it because the story flowed all the way through to the end. Like Disciples of Fortune, The Monk is a recommended classic.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lewis was way ahead of his time., 13 April 2006
By 
D. Hervey "Classic Temptation" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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If you like Gothic and Romantic fiction (as in Romanticism, not romance)then this is a must. Written at the same time William Blake was composing his etchings, at the end of the eighteenth century. It was originally banded for being to contraversial as it supported revolution in the uk. Back then it was massively popular and the first editions completely sold out before the government could do anything about it. Written by a very young Lewis (in his late teens), it tells of an adventure that befalls a number of characters belonging to the spanish bourgeoisie. The main focus is on a holier-than-thou monk who is seduced by demons to become the devil's instrument. The story has everything; murder, rape, incest, adultery, banditary, rioting, the supernatural, torture, etc.

If you enjoy classic fiction then you will definitely enjoy this. It is written in a surprisingly modern fashion. Personally I think if it was re-introduced as a modern day work of fiction then very few would realise that it is over 200 yrs old. If you're not into classical fiction, but are more of a modern reader, then I think you'll still enjoy it.

It is the only book that MGL wrote, but it is one of Britain's greatest ever literary works that has been all but forgotten. It's time it was remembered!
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