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28 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Shocking Insight
I'd recommend this to anyone, whether they had heard of the Magdalen Laundries or not.
The book chronicles Kathy's experiences at the hands of Religious Reform schools and later the Magdalen Laundries, and the awful abuse that she and many other children suffered.
She discusses the legacy that this has left in Ireland - mental hospitals full of women who became...
Published on 13 Aug. 2005 by Lucy Reynolds

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36 of 39 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Ripped off!
I brought this book some time ago & was genuinely moved it. The things this poor women went through were truely horrific....
....then I found out that the nasty little woman made it all up! How dare she! There are many people that have actually had to suffer these experiences and are probably too scared, even today, to tell their stories. Not our Kathy, hey? She's...
Published on 29 Nov. 2007 by KittyCatastrophe


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36 of 39 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Ripped off!, 29 Nov. 2007
This review is from: Kathy's Story: A Childhood Hell Inside the Magdalen Laundries (Paperback)
I brought this book some time ago & was genuinely moved it. The things this poor women went through were truely horrific....
....then I found out that the nasty little woman made it all up! How dare she! There are many people that have actually had to suffer these experiences and are probably too scared, even today, to tell their stories. Not our Kathy, hey? She's all too happy to reap the benefits of telling such a disturbing story of her life without ever actually having to go through any of it herself...well done!

Maybe she should be made to go and speak to some REAL victims of the Laundries to give her some idea of how awful she really is for doing this?

Also...to all those saying 'I do not understand how anyone could believe that Kathy lied about this story. Why would anyone lie about such a horrific past?' or 'i find it very difficult to believe that someone would make up such horrific lies about their past' - you need a reality check.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A despicable fraud, 28 Nov. 2012
This review is from: Kathy's Story: A Childhood Hell Inside the Magdalen Laundries (Paperback)
As has been well documented by now, "Kathy's Story/Don't Ever Tell" was an elaborate hoax. The whole unsavoury case tells us a lot about the culture of lies, deceit and false accusations targeting the Catholic Church since 2002. The book became a best-seller in Ireland and Britain. Yes, incredibly, 400,000 people were conned. In reality, they are but a tiny fraction of the millions who have been duped over the last decade.

Kathy O'Beirne claims she spent years as a slave to sadistic nuns in the Magdalene laundries (institutions run by the Catholic church to house young women and unmarried mothers), how she was raped there by two priests, gave birth at the age of 13, and how she had her hand thrust into boiling fat by her alcoholic father.

It came as little surprise when family, friends, official records and respected journalist Hermann Kelly (author of "Kathy's Real Story") revealed that this deeply disturbed former psychiatric patient, who has a criminal record for dishonesty, made it all up.

The daughter she claims she bore at the age of 13 did not exist. And a priest who allegedly raped and beat her suffered from such severe arthritis he could not even shake hands. Moreover, she tried to bribe a friend (Margaret Power) to be a "witness" to that rape. According to official records and eyewitness statements, she was never even in a Magdalene laundry. Nonetheless, she threatened to have those who challenge her account "dealt with."

A planned sequel to the book was unceremoniously dumped by publisher Hodder Headline in 2009.

Of course, lurid tales of child abuse and misery sell books and newspapers. False accusations can yield significant financial gain, and seldom receive or even require corroboration. In the last 3 years alone 173 false accusations have been lodged against Catholic priests in the US. In that time there have been approximately 21 accusations involving a current minor that were even deemed "credible." That is a far lower figure than is the case in other religions. The three companies that insure the majority of Protestant churches in America state that they typically receive upward of 260 reports each year of young people under 18 being sexually abused by clergy, church staff, volunteers or congregation members.

Yet those numbers are dwarfed by the abuse taking place in public schools in the US and other countries, and in society at large (stepfathers, uncles, scout leaders, coaches, teachers, and so on). The author of a 2004 report commissioned by the US Department of Education, Hofstra University's Charol Shakeshaft, said, "The physical sexual abuse of students in schools is likely more than 100 times the abuse by priests." Meanwhile, according to government numbers, in 2010 alone, there were some 63,527 reported cases of child sexual abuse in the United States.

So how was Kathy O'Beirne able to con so many people? Because, although child sexual abuse is a societal problem, as Professor Philip Jenkins has pointed out, our tendency as a society is to seek simplistic answers for complex social problems. Couple that with a media that today seeks to form public opinion rather than inform the public, and you can see why O'Beirne's fabrication would meet a receptive audience, all too ready to embrace yet another "victim" of a big, bad institution. None of which should diminish our concern for genuine victims of abuse, who are done a disservice by false accusations like O'Beirne's.

Although the Catholic Church has put its house in order (most of its abuse cases were from the mid 1960s to early 1980s), other institutions have not. Until they do, we are likely to see more "misery literature" - hopefully based on fact, not fiction.

PS I am happy to provide references for the above quotes and statistics, all of which are publicly available.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Disgusted by the author, 11 Mar. 2008
By 
Baba ganoush (British Columbia, CA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Kathy's Story: A Childhood Hell Inside the Magdalen Laundries (Paperback)
At first, upon reading this novel, I was shocked and moved at this "true" story of a young girl. Just a few weeks after reading this, however, I came across a television documentary involving O'Beirne. It turns out that many people deny that the events that she claim to have taken place ever happened, including members of her own family. In this, she offered to take a lie detector test while answering some questions about the events. She agreed, under the terms that her brother (who said that she was lying in her book) went first. Her brother passed the test, and soon after, she backed out of taking it. I was just disgusted that she conned so many people with wht is obviously a lie.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A nice story, but only a story., 17 April 2012
This review is from: Kathy's Story: A Childhood Hell Inside the Magdalen Laundries (Paperback)
This is a fictional story, please don't be deceived by it. Its a genre which unfortunately sells.Please read Kathy's real story.In short.She made it up.Kathy's Real Story: A Culture of False Allegations Exposed
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28 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Shocking Insight, 13 Aug. 2005
By 
Lucy Reynolds "Lucy" (West Midlands, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Kathy's Story: A Childhood Hell Inside the Magdalen Laundries (Paperback)
I'd recommend this to anyone, whether they had heard of the Magdalen Laundries or not.
The book chronicles Kathy's experiences at the hands of Religious Reform schools and later the Magdalen Laundries, and the awful abuse that she and many other children suffered.
She discusses the legacy that this has left in Ireland - mental hospitals full of women who became so disturbed and institutionalised by the schools and laundries, that they will never experience normal life again.
Kathy's courage is striking as she manages to focus her emotions towards fighting for justice for herself and for the other women.
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22 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars same sad story, 21 Sept. 2006
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Kathy's Story: A Childhood Hell Inside the Magdalen Laundries (Paperback)
i read dont ever tell and was so moved i bought kathys story-childhood hell inside the magdalane laundries

the thing is its the same book with just a differnt title!!!!

the only difference is that there are some phots of kathy and her family in this one so although either book is brilliant there is no point in buying the 2
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Compelling Read, 27 April 2006
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This review is from: Kathy's Story: A Childhood Hell Inside the Magdalen Laundries (Paperback)
I read this book virtually in one sitting and then I promptly lent it to my sister who wasn't able to put it down either, in fact she kept phoning me up wanting to discuss it.

It is horrible to believe that this sort of thing went on only 40 odd years ago, and that some of the victims are still institutionalised. The horrific mental and physical torture that these young girls and women went through, well words fail me. I have never been a great lover of the Catholic faith, and the treatment by the nuns and priests who blatantly abused their positions or turned a blind eye have the nerve to say they are God's Children. They are the penitients which Kathy speaks about throughout her book not the women and children who were sent to these hell holes.

It must have been such a shock to the young Kathy who was told she was going for a trip to the seaside only to find out that her evil father was leaving her at an industrial school and that her mother was not allowed to contact you. What kind of a God feaering man could do that to his own child!?

Kathy's strength of character shines through the pages, her determination to try and help herself and others just goes to show that having suffered the most horrific of lifes cannot break the spirit. "What doesn't kill you only makes you stronger", and Kathy is testament to this.

Despite how evil and vindictive her father was, Kathy still nursed him through his illness in later years. I don't think I would have been as merciful. This was a man who beat her daily, left her outside all day or night in all weathers, deprived her of food and made her live in the garden shed!

By the end of this book you will have gone through a whole number of different emotions with Kathy, but most of all you will want justice for Kathy and all the other victims of this abuse. I hope that one day they will get it and Kathy can finally put her past to rest.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Kathy's Real Story: A culture of false allegations exposed, 28 Oct. 2007
By 
Tony Napier (Sutton Coldfield, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Kathy's Story: A Childhood Hell Inside the Magdalen Laundries (Paperback)
Re-writing my review in 2013, it horrifies me to see that there are people so gullible that six years after Kathy O'Beirne was exposed as a lying fraud by Dublin Journalist Hermann Kelly, there are still people buying this book and reviewing it as if it were a true story, praising the author for her "bravery" in telling her "story". I think it was G. K. Chesterton in one of his Father Brown stories who said that once a lie has begun to circulate, the truth will never catch up with it.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Despair, 8 July 2006
By 
Ms. A. J. Burcham (Peterborough, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Kathy's Story: A Childhood Hell Inside the Magdalen Laundries (Paperback)
You know critics always write things like "you'll feel like your really there" and "you experience the same emotions", its crap, reading this book there is no way you can feel how sh feels, you can feel horrow, disgust, betrayed, sad, mortified and so on and so on but you can never feel how Kathy feels.

I could not put this book down, my mother read it, handed it to me and i couldnt stop reading, i will put my hand up and say several times i cried, once even on the bus. It is horrid to think that this could happen to anyone in this world, it is also disgusting that those who have the power to stop it merely turn there heads. This book is brilliant and deserves to be read by everyone and recognized for the sheer bravery it took to be written.
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26 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Horrific Life, 29 May 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Kathy's Story: A Childhood Hell Inside the Magdalen Laundries (Paperback)
This book is a detailed history, memoir of a woman (child) that must endure a horrific life. It reminds me somewhat of another book i read titled NIGHTMARES ECHO (Excellent book). Yet, even this story surpasses most books I have read along this subject line
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Kathy's Story: A Childhood Hell Inside the Magdalen Laundries
Kathy's Story: A Childhood Hell Inside the Magdalen Laundries by Kathy O'Beirne (Paperback - 9 Jun. 2005)
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