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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant sequel to the Cold War Bombers
I loved the previous book: Britain's Cold War Bombers - and this is just as good.

The same excellent quality paper, great photographs and knowledgeable text.

The book covers the range of weird and wonderful aircraft that the UK's boffins managed to dream up in the 1950s, once they had got the hang of the jet engine.

From the early days of...
Published 8 months ago by Mark Shackelford

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8 of 15 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not well written
Not finished the book yet but that process is only going to be made harder by writing this bad:

"This seminal leap in technology was applicable to the design of fast and long-range, nuclear-armed bombers such as the Valiant, Victor and Vulcan. There is no doubt that once the prospect of jet power was accepted as a viable concept, it was primarily applied to...
Published 7 months ago by T. Brearley


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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant sequel to the Cold War Bombers, 7 Dec 2013
By 
Mark Shackelford "mark shackelford" (Worthing, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Britain's Cold War Fighters (Hardcover)
I loved the previous book: Britain's Cold War Bombers - and this is just as good.

The same excellent quality paper, great photographs and knowledgeable text.

The book covers the range of weird and wonderful aircraft that the UK's boffins managed to dream up in the 1950s, once they had got the hang of the jet engine.

From the early days of the (sadly) nameless Gloster prototype struggling into the air, followed by the amazing Meteor - we then follow the Venoms and Vampires, the Scimitars and Swifts, the Hunters and Javelins, the utterly wonderful Lightnings and then through the world of the Phantom to todays less heroic and somehow less wonderful Typhoons.

Along the way we meet the designers, the test pilots and the flyers.

Great nostalgia - for someone who grew up in the 1960s watching these amazing flying machines out of the school window - so much more fun than Latin!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars excellent, 31 Dec 2013
This review is from: Britain's Cold War Fighters (Hardcover)
lots of books on these aircraft have been produced, i have over a dozen in my collection.
but this is one of the best single volumes i have seen, as stated it contains loads of new photo's of these fantastic machines which i have never seen before.
the text is well researched and tells the evolution of britains jet fighters in a easy to read manner.
a excellent tribute to the men who developed, tested and flew these machines.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Hot book on a cold war, 23 May 2014
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This review is from: Britain's Cold War Fighters (Hardcover)
I remember well my first exercise in Germany and freezing my proverbial's off in a trench in the coldest winter Europe had suffered in decades. I was serving in the RAF Regiment, and we had been entrenched in the countryside around RAF Bruggen for a week, unaware that due to the extreme cold, the exercise had been called off. We had been forgotten and left in our dug-outs. Nothing new for a serving Rock Ape during the Cold war. When we eventually returned to Bruggen - there had been only a single case of frost-bite - I remember sleeping for an entire day, after which I recall visiting the line of derelict Lightnings that guarded a remote corner of Bruggen's airfield and which I had glimpsed on first entering the camp some days previously. They were in a sorry state, over-grown with weeds and finished in a faded over-all NATO Green colour scheme, they were a shadow of their former-selves: Once proud front-line fighters turned to so much scrap metal through neglect. It was Phantoms and Jaguars that now filled the sky above us, and the superb Harriers that awaited our return home to RAF Wittering following what had been a memorable exercise for mostly the wrong reasons.
Since a boy, I have been fascinated by British Jets, and this book is, I suppose, the book I have been waiting for. I have recently re-discovered my interest in post-war jets and having tried various volumes on individual aircraft types - which tend to be over-stuffed with nostalgic memories, like my own above, or over-ripe with performance data that simply bores one after a while - Tiim McLelland's book simply gives us a chronological run-through of the post-war fighters that is a joy to read. I could not put this book down, and have since gone on to buy his Cold War Bombers, that I am reading now with equal enthusiasm.
Stuffed with photographs, this is a must-buy for anyone remotely interested in our post-war aviation history - the trials and tribulations of aircraft design and the frustrating incompetence of meddling ministers and bureaucrats that have destroyed a once great industry and continue to destroy our once great nation. I highly recommend it.
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8 of 15 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not well written, 28 Dec 2013
By 
T. Brearley (Devon, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Britain's Cold War Fighters (Hardcover)
Not finished the book yet but that process is only going to be made harder by writing this bad:

"This seminal leap in technology was applicable to the design of fast and long-range, nuclear-armed bombers such as the Valiant, Victor and Vulcan. There is no doubt that once the prospect of jet power was accepted as a viable concept, it was primarily applied to the design of potential fighter aircraft. This is hardly surprising as the jet engine delivered incredible speed. However, British aircraft designers believed that although fighters should possess agility and a capability to fly as high and as far as possible, the most important criterion for any new fighter was that of speed."

What??
- Can you have a 'seminal' leap?
- Are the first two sentences connected in any way?
- Ok, potential fighter aircraft. What about actual fighters? Them too?
- Another sentence beginning 'this'. Excellent.
- However? Do you mean 'And'?
- Why was speed more important than agility or altitude? We're never told. Obviously not interesting or relevant to the history of jet fighters.

Was this book edited at all? Hmm.
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Britain's Cold War Fighters
Britain's Cold War Fighters by Tim McLelland (Hardcover - 24 Oct 2013)
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