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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A bit more than just Sherlock Holmes
When Dr. Watson returns to London by train he finds himself caught up in a bombing at Waterloo station. After giving what attention he can to those injured in the attack he wastes no time in getting to 221B Baker Street and his friend Sherlock Holmes.

This is the third in a series of bombings which hold London and its inhabitants in a scary hold, with theories...
Published 16 months ago by Marleen

versus
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Christ on a bike
This isn't so much a customer review (since I had the good fortune to get the book from the local library, rather than pay money for it) as a punch-drunk reader review.
It would be fair to say that I have rarely read such a bad book. There is no shortage of post-Doyle Holmes 'fabrications'; many are American, and it usually shows Many are British, and few of those...
Published 7 months ago by Aphid


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A bit more than just Sherlock Holmes, 3 Sep 2013
By 
Marleen (Cavan, Ireland) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Sherlock Holmes - The Stuff of Nightmares (Paperback)
When Dr. Watson returns to London by train he finds himself caught up in a bombing at Waterloo station. After giving what attention he can to those injured in the attack he wastes no time in getting to 221B Baker Street and his friend Sherlock Holmes.

This is the third in a series of bombings which hold London and its inhabitants in a scary hold, with theories about the bombers and their reasons getting more hysterical by the day.

But the bombings are not the only strange phenomena in London at the time. A strange creature, about eight feet tall, with enormous strength and a scary arsenal of weapons has taken on London's underworld. He interrupts misdeeds and incapacitates the villains although he never kills his opponents. Only known by the name Baron Cauchemar, many consider this man a myth, yet Sherlock Holmes is convinced that the Baron may be the key that will lead to unlocking the identity of those behind the bombings. And although both his brother, Mycroft and Dr. Watson have their doubts, he is determined to conduct his investigation along those lines.

What follows is an investigation that will bring our two heroes face to face with pure evil. Confronting mortal danger more than once Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson have not only men's evil to contend with, but also technological advances beyond their wildest imaginations. With the future of the British Empire at stake, Holmes and Watson have to embrace an unlikely ally if there are going to prevent disaster.

I have to say that I'm greatly enjoying this series of newly written Sherlock Holmes adventures. While the stories in this series are close enough to the originals to keep fans of Arthur Conan Doyle happy, they also provide us with story lines that go beyond what he might have been able to conceive of in his days.

The Stuff of Nightmares is an intriguing, well plotted and fast paced mystery, just as you would expect from a Sherlock Holmes story. What makes this book that little bit more special is the fact that it also contains elements that strongly remind me of Steam-Punk. It was fun to see Watson immediately think of the supernatural whenever he encounters something he doesn't understand while Holmes, even when he has no better idea what exactly he is dealing with than his partner does, insists that there has to be a logical explanation.

Apart from the steam-punkish elements, this is exactly what you would expect from a Sherlock Holmes story. We are given a dire threat, no obvious clues, quite a bit of misdirection and Holmes talking in riddles, just as he would in one of the traditional stories. We encounter familiar names from the Sherlock Holmes stories: the Baker Street Irregulars, Professor Moriarty, Mycroft Holmes, Inspector Lestrade, they all make an appearance and live up to their established reputation. While Sherlock Holmes purists may well find one or more things to object to in this book, I found great pleasure in the non-traditional elements of this story.

James Lovegrove is an established and successful author of Science Fiction books and his writing experience shines through in this book. The story is smooth, the plot well developed and the mystery intriguing enough to keep the reader guessing until the author, or Sherlock Holmes, is ready to enlighten them. The author's background is clear though when you read the technological descriptions in this book; the machines and contraptions are described in such detail that it is easy to visualise them.

Overall I would call this a very welcome addition to the Sherlock Holmes stories that we know and love. Filled with danger, action and mystery, this is a book that is hard to put down once started. If Mr. Lovegrove ever decides to write another Sherlock Holmes story I will definitely read it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Strange Uncanny, 9 Oct 2013
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Sherlock Holmes has always been a fantastical character, a hero larger than life with extraordinary and unlikely abilities, and he's well suited to adventures of a strange and uncanny nature. In this rollicking yarn, Lovegrove bleeds a little of the steampunk genre into the great detective's world, and does it in so careful and explicable a way that the resulting story does not feel terribly out of place next to Doyle's original tales. A key part of the blend is Watson's narration, so impeccably depicted here that it carries a weight of splendid authenticity, and sells the added elements with delightful authority. What usually suffers in new fictions such as this is Holmes himself, who can sometimes take second fiddle to new gimmicks. Not here. Holmes is dominant throughout, and exactly the powerhouse of deduction you would expect. Great fun.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dramatic, gripping and exciting, 1 Sep 2013
This review is from: Sherlock Holmes - The Stuff of Nightmares (Paperback)
From its breathtaking and shocking opening, you know this is going to be a memorable outing for Holmes and Watson. London has, through the suspected terrorist attacks, become a city under siege. With mounting social unrest, the threat of riots and fear and confusion everywhere, our heroes are up against time as well as a formidable and cunning adversary.

This "problem" goes right to the heart of the British Empire, threatening the institution of the Monarchy itself. You know there is big trouble when the usually unflappable older brother of Holmes, Mycroft is rattled.

The enigmatic character of Baron Cauchemar is exciting and reminiscent of Iron man or Batman. This nineteenth century vigilante suffers from the same problem: is he a friend or foe?

With its martial arts, fast, unrelenting action, suspense and heroics this has all the ingredients you could hope for in a Sherlock Holmes adventure. Fortunately, it is also clear that Lovegrove is a fan of Holmes' creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, as there are plenty of references and allusions to the original canon. Furthermore, and crucially, the characters of Holmes, Watson, Mycroft and Lestrade all ring true. These are not just caricatures, but the same people from the original four novels and fifty-six short stories. They are here with all their individual tics, mannerisms and eccentricities.

So, we have Sherlock Holmes, Steampunk, a nineteenth century crime fighter, and a plot that could change the face of Europe. Dramatic, gripping, exciting and respectful to its source material, I thoroughly enjoyed every surprise and twist as the story unfolded. If this is to be Lovegrove's sole novel (he has already written a Holmes pastiche prior to this) then he has left us with a very impressive continuation novel indeed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well worth a read., 29 Sep 2013
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This review is from: Sherlock Holmes - The Stuff of Nightmares (Paperback)
The test of any truly good pastiche is whether or not you find yourself still trailing doggedly behind Homes and Watson after the first 20 pages or so, as they wind their way through the foggy thoroughfares of old London town. I can say unequivically that with this you certainly do. Whilst some of the terms used are not those that Doyle would have used they are easily overlooked. If you are a fan then read it. You won't be disappointed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable., 26 Sep 2013
By 
Gary Robinson "garyrobbo54" (Cumbria, UK) - See all my reviews
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Conan Doyle it isnt, but an enjoyable read nevertheless. There are clever links to other Sherlock Holmes books, but at times it was a bit too Indiana Jones!! But for an enjoyable read, yes I would recommend this book
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lovegrove works magic, 16 Sep 2013
By 
Gareth Wilson - Falcata Times Blog "Falcata T... - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Sherlock Holmes - The Stuff of Nightmares (Paperback)
Whilst the Holmes novels from Titan are a step in the fantastical, I love the way that they allow others to play in the world bringing it not only to life but adding a touch of Urban Fantasy so that the reader is in for a real treat, in this case the Steampunk character of Baron Cauchemar who is not only delightfully dark but with a mysteriousness that really does deserve the world's greatest detectives mental acumen. It's a joy to read as James takes you not only a journey of this alternate Victorian London but brings all the components to life that works so well for me as a reader.

The pace is wonderful constantly leaving the reader on the back foot as the case is unravelled and when added to the authors usual style of twisting the readers perceptions alongside a great way of delivering a story all round makes this something that you just can't ignore.

Back that up with some wonderful background characters as well as a constant feel for Holmes and Watson, all round makes this a pure joy. I deduce that this was a title of great fun.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars There are two types of SH pastiches ..., 22 Aug 2013
This review is from: Sherlock Holmes - The Stuff of Nightmares (Paperback)
There are two types of Sherlock Holmes pastiches: those that work; and, those that don't. This book falls firmly into the latter category, though it is difficult to pin down why it should do so. The main reason is that this book is utterly un-Doyle in its narrative style, focusing as much on technology (Steam Punk/ Jules Verne) as it does on mental detection. There is also a great deal of boundary crossing within the next, drawing on (but not restricted to) modern tropes such as Batman and Transformers. Yet work it does, producing a tight and fast-paced narrative. And whilst it is so unlike the canon produced by Conan Doyle, yet it is still worthy to be counted as a good pastiche of his Sherlock Holmes novels.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Sherlock Holmes - The stuff of Nightmares, 14 July 2014
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This review is from: Sherlock Holmes - The Stuff of Nightmares (Paperback)
James Lovegrove is a very good writer. You can`t avoid beeing excited at the same time as you feel the houmor
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic stuff, this is writing that you cannot (or ..., 5 Nov 2014
This review is from: Sherlock Holmes - The Stuff of Nightmares (Paperback)
Fantastic stuff, this is writing that you cannot (or I could not put down and have started to re read) put down. Fantastic characterisation, brilliant period feel. I cannot get enough! Added to which the service was irreproachable.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellently paced with fantastic characters particularly the villain of the piece, 6 Dec 2014
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This review is from: Sherlock Holmes - The Stuff of Nightmares (Paperback)
Fabulous! I read this in 2 sittings. Excellently paced with fantastic characters particularly the villain of the piece.
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Sherlock Holmes - The Stuff of Nightmares
Sherlock Holmes - The Stuff of Nightmares by James Lovegrove (Paperback - 30 Aug 2013)
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