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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great read!
I love the Old republic and the KOToR games and this book is a great addition. It answers so many questions to answers raised in KOToR I & II. Not to mention that the writer helps write The Old Republic!

AWESOME!!
Published 10 months ago by Mr Alex D Simons

versus
41 of 48 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Pretty shocking to be honest.
Karpyshyn stated in advance that some fans who had played through KOTOR were going to be disappointed, that the Revan of the novel would be different to the character many gamers had created, both in terms of personality and power. Fair enough. Bioware created an RPG where fans' choices would affect the development of Revan's character and where by the end he would be an...
Published on 28 Nov 2011 by faustus sulla


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41 of 48 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Pretty shocking to be honest., 28 Nov 2011
By 
faustus sulla (newark, nottinghamshire) - See all my reviews
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Karpyshyn stated in advance that some fans who had played through KOTOR were going to be disappointed, that the Revan of the novel would be different to the character many gamers had created, both in terms of personality and power. Fair enough. Bioware created an RPG where fans' choices would affect the development of Revan's character and where by the end he would be an unstoppable badass, because in gaming terms that makes perfect sense. For a novel, the canon light-side Revan was the natural choice for the character, and his talents would have to be downgraded because it's hard to create a sense of tension and risk if the protaganist can easily mow down any opposition he faces.

The problem is that the criticism Karpyshyn was trying to anticipate was a straw man. The problem isn't that Revan can't take down a half-dozen enemies with one force power, or that after having his memory wiped and being brainwashed by the Jedi he somehow decided to follow the Jedi way. What drew me - and, I hazard to guess, most fans - to a Revan novel was the fascinating complexity and thoughfulness that had gone into Revan's backstory, as revealed in conversations with those who new him in the KOTOR games, especially Kreia, HK-47, the Disciple, and Atton in KOTOR 2. They told a story of a man who saw through the childish philosophy of the Jedi Code and turned aside from it when he knew it was necessary, without, crucially, instantly going to the other extreme and becoming a pantomime villain of a Sith Lord. The idea was that Revan was a Jedi who saw a threat the magnitute of which the Republic was structurally incapable of dealing with. Knowing from bitter experience (the Mandalorian Wars) that he could never convince those in power of the need for radical action, he decided to create - by force - an imperial dictatorship capable of resisting an invasion by the 'true' Sith. Yes the conquest would be brutal and destructive in the short term, but he deliberately avoided damaging infrastructure during his attack on the Republic in the hope that in the long term he would be able to rebuild and strengthen so as to save the galaxy from the horrors of complete devastation. Whatever you think about the decision, it raises fascinating questions ripe for exploration as literary themes: when does the end justify the means? what constitutes necessary evil? what if you do something terrible for the greater good but then fail in the process (as Revan did) so that the greater good never arrives and only the terrible deeds remain?

Instead we have this paper thin plot, with paper thin characters (read the other reviews for summaries). There's good and evil and straight heroes and villains, none of whom are remotely interesting because they're absurdly two-dimensional. Canderous, given such surprising pathos in both KOTOR games, is a half-baked sidekick. Bastila goes from the strong and principled but arrogant and naive woman of the first game into a simpering stay-at-home mum. The exile is just your run-of-the-mill Jedi. T3 buzzes about for no apparent reason, while the much more interesting prospect of HK's involvement never materialises. The new Sith are instantly forgettable stereotypes, while the emperor only stands out because he's ridiculously powerful (although as one reviewer has already noted, he's really Darth Nihilus Mark II, except nowhere near as intriguing or intimidating as Obsidian made Nihilus in Kotor II). Revan himself mouths platitudes about neither Jedi or Sith being right and harmonising between light and dark, but his character is essentially a wise-cracking (with jokes that aren't funny) Luke Skywalker light. Oh, and (spoiler) it turns out he only invaded the Republic because the emperor did some magic on him and Malak. Brilliant.

We knew to expect this of course. Matt Stover tried to deal with some of the above questions when - for a brief moment - he turned the EU intelligent with Jacen and Vegere in Traitor. It even looked like they were continuing it with the intriguing opening to Legacy of the Force, before Troy Denning and the editors put their foot down and Jacen by the end of the series had seemingly arbitrarily transformed into Darth Voldemort.

To summarise, this isn't great. It's a run of the mill Star Wars novel, which for a writer who showed such promise in at least the first Bane novel is itself a disappointment. Even worse, he's done it to Revan, who has become so popular among Star Wars fans despite only appearing in a couple of games almost a decade old precisely because he was compelling and different, a Jedi more assertive and calculating than any other Jedi, a Sith more humane and restrained than any other Sith. Furthermore, the prose is average at best (for those who ask what else to expect from a Star Wars novel, read Stover, or Karen Traviss, or even Denning), and repeatedly dips into being juvenile and crass; it shows no improvement since Karpyshyn's first novel, which is worrying. Meanwhile, the author's general structuring, plotting and character development seem to be getting worse as time goes on.

Those looking for a typical Star Wars novel, go ahead. Fans of Revan, avoid. Instead, dig out that old copy of Kotor II, find all the parts for HK, play as a female character so you can get the Disciple, and make sure to gain influence with him, Atton and Kreia. Then listen to them talk about Revan, and try and forget you ever heard this novel existed.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars not bad, but expected more, 27 Dec 2011
the book ties up both the kotor games but i wonder if the wriiter had his hands tied behind his back because of ToR and the game's story line (the revanite quests may have blocked a good conclusion).

overall the book pace was good but it didnt pace up quicker and the suporting cast was not well developed.

a little disapointed but it passed a family christmas ;)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Revan may as well have died slipping on a banana peel, 25 Mar 2014
By 
majorlynch (Cork, Ireland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Star Wars The Old Republic - Revan (Paperback)
This is just pointless filler, ruining classic characters for no reason.

The original KOTOR was an industry changing masterpiece. What added to it was the inclusion of a believable love story between characters you learned to care about.

This book takes those characters and feeds their lives into a meat grinder for seemingly no reason at all.

---------------------SPOLIER WARNING-------------------------------

So Revan and Bastila only have a few years together so Revan can travel to the other side of the galaxy, immediately get captured and spend FOUR YEARS IN A PRISON CELL.
EXCITING!

I actually can't think of a dumber storyline in the SW universe. A celebrated kick ass hero just sits in his cell for four years......and this is fiction mind you.
Then he fights the Emperor and IMMEDIATELY fails and gets captured again.
How did this guy save the universe before?

And his sacrifice stops the emperor invading earlier?
It really seems like Revan and Bastila could have had a great life together and the Emperor invaded when he did for some other dumb reason.
They picked the date based on canon convenience, they didn't require or need Revan's "sacrifice".

So the whole thing just comes off as ruining brilliant characters for no reason.

The only thing it did accomplish was stating that Revan meet the Emperor before. Which was covered in other media before the Old Rebublic game was complete.

Plus if you want the hero to stop someone invading, LET HIM BLOW SOMETHING UP. Not hypnotise the guy in his sleep.

---------------------SPOILER WARNING ENDS-------------------------------

Also I remember when a SW hardback being really good was taken as read (heh). About the last good hardback was Vision of the future in 1998.

But paying hardback prices for a woeful story like this just showed how the EU novels lost the plot.

SW EU used to be excitement and adventure in a big open universe. Up until the end of the new jedi order this was the case.

Now its a small locality with adventures that read like they've been decided by committee.

I think Drew Karpyshyn was taken into a meeting, told what the story would be, and given very little freedom to change anything.

Hence the "Scrouge" character who I couldn't stop caring about fast enough.

Just another book running SW EU into the ground.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great read!, 17 Oct 2013
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I love the Old republic and the KOToR games and this book is a great addition. It answers so many questions to answers raised in KOToR I & II. Not to mention that the writer helps write The Old Republic!

AWESOME!!
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16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Oh Dear..., 23 Nov 2011
I haven't finished this book, as I am finding it almost painful to read. You would have to be a die-hard star wars fan to appreciate this.
The problem I have is the way in which this is written, its almost juvenile in its style. The authors use of language is lamentable. Apparently one pages through a book, not leaf, he also has issues distinguishing between words like ravish and ravage. That this wasnt even spotted by the editor is a clear sign of the amateur way in which this is written and produced.
I have to say from what I have read so far I agree with robccld, this is not Revan from KOTOR. If I am honest I shouldnt have expected anything more from a Star Wars novel.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The worst addition to the star wars novels I have read., 15 Feb 2012
This book was a massive dissapointment. The book should be called SCOURGE because he is the predominant figure in the novel, ironically his is the only character I found interesting. Raven is hard to read and lacks in so many areas. other reviews seem to follow this theme so I will not draw out my conclusion. Safe to say is unbelievable that Drew Karpshyn wrote this and what i feel is the one of the best novels I have read, Darth Bane path of destruction!. In my eyes he has gone from hero to zero!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Perhaps a worthy prequel to the MMO, but not as a sequel to KOTOR..., 6 Jan 2012
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First off, Drew Karpshyn is a great addition to the Star Wars universe. It's evident in his best works, KOTOR and the first Darth Bane novel, and in, what I think is, his worst - Revan. It's obvious he enjoys prowling through the GFFA, whether it's philosophizing on the nature of the force or going into the 'faster, more intense!'-nature of the Star Wars action.

The biggest problem that this book has is, as others have mentioned, that it's a marketing tool to promote the MMO. The focus is almost entirely on setting up that world; instead of continuing the one that KotoR built.

When KOTOR II revealed that Revan had left the known universe to look for some mysterious threat. I'm sure I wasn't the only one who instantly envisioned epic adventures that we would/could be taken on in KOTOR III (or as was revealed, this novel). Instead, Revan basically gets knocked out by the first people he encounters and.... Enter the MMO world. There's a quest that he and Canderous go on which, while entertaining, wasn't that necessary - Canderous told us the most important part in KOTOR II already. It honestly felt to me that the only reason Canderous got so much attention, over Carth/HK/or ANY of the other sidekicks Revan and the Exile had, was because, again, the bounty hunters have to be promoted for the MMO.

Now that I think of it, the Exile doesn't even mention any of the KOTOR II partners. Nor does she really reflect on her encounters with Kreia, Nihilus, Sion. Which makes sense only if you think that those characters would detract from the villains in this book - which they would. The betrayals/treason that the Sith go through is virtually the same as what happened between Kreia and her apprentices - Nihilus, in particular, seems like the prototype of the Sith Emperor.

That's Revan and the Exile. Now for the Sith. Scourge probably steals the show in the book, he's the only character that really has an arc (Revan's is having flashbacks which doesn't really change his character... at all, and the exile's, whose name we learn btw, is finding Revan) - and it makes me wonder if Drew would've rather just written a book about his character and how the Sith way of life, plus encountering a Jedi, affect him.

The other Sith are what you expect Sith to be - the Emperor was a bit too extreme for my taste. Kind of makes Palpatine look like a politician who just happened to be a Sith. Revan's philosophy on the force was interesting, although it felt more like Drew's opinion than Revan's philosophy. I don't mind that it's opposed to what George consistently states, Matthew Stover did a great job with Vergere/Jacen without betraying that train of thought, but it feels more like Revan(Drew) being bit arrogant on the ignorant Jedi/Sith(George) rather than him being knowledgable/wise(Stover) about it.

In conclusion: I'm glad they did not call this 'Knights of the Old Republic III' because it's really not. It's a story that introduces us to some of the MMO characters - and finds a way to work Revan and the Exile into it as well. It's a not a great story, but it's entertaining enough to give it a shot. I don't particularly like what it did, or tried to do, in changing our perception on the KotoR games - but ah well.

Those games will always be great, and we can also thank Drew for that.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Lazy and anti-climatic, 3 Dec 2011
By 
G. Mayers (Pontypool, Torfaen United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
First off, the previous work I read by this author (Drew something or over)was the Darth Bane trilogy and I greatly enjoyed them. So I was very much looking forward to him writing about the Revan character from Star Wars Knights of the Old Republic. In my eyes Revan is one of the most interesting and complex of any star wars character, so a novel delving into his past and fate was something I very much looked forward to. Alas, this book is a major let down in many ways. As a tie in with the bioware Star Wars Old Republic mmo I wasn't expecting something on the level of Timothy Zahn's Heir to the Empire trilogy, but I was still very disapointed.
First off, it is not entirely about Revan. No, instead the book is split into chapters with Revan and chapters with a Sith Lord called Scourge. To me this is an irritating trend in many books lately as it hints the writer did not have enough story to make a full story with one character and so put two shorter ones together. The two plotlines do converge eventually but not in a satisfying way. The Revan sections are good (at first) but the Scourge sections read like someone played the Old Republic and then wrote rather lazy fan-fiction, trying to write in narrative form how they played the Old Republic game. It is hard to describe but it felt like the character went from quest giver to quest location, killed some mobs, intereacted with the glowie, engaged in conversation with npcs/companion, then returned to the quest giver (apologies to non-gamers but I'm sure someone can translate that for you).
Then we come to the ending. Now, I'm not going to spoil it for anyone but it has to be one of the worst and most anticlimatic endings I have read for a good while. Revan's fate is so ignoble and painfully hacky, nothing more than a plot device for the mmo players to uncover. I was annoyed by this ending and I had not been annoyed by a book for a good while. Bored, yes. Angry I had wasted money, certainly, but annoyed by the writing, not for a while.
I am truly glad I bought this book in kindle format as it was only about 4 pound when I did. Not its 8 and that to me is too much. Had I bought it in book form I would have been even less forgiving about it. Obviously, if you're so desperate for the secrets of the Old Republic to be revealed in the run up to the game's release, this may satisfy you. For people who want a good read, I suggest waiting for the price to come down a lot lower and read something else.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Anticlimatic,a disgrace to built legacy, full of lazy writing and cheap excuses, ending with NO conclusion., 1 Dec 2011
Revan: I am Revan reborn.Before me you are nothing.
Drew Karpyshyn: Sorry Rev. but I was told to put you to sleep so I could bring you to new MMO game.300 years in the future! Excited ?
Rev: ...
Drew Karpyshyn: But before that I'll disgrace the legacy of 8year old Kotor I and 7year old Kotor II by ignoring and changing the accomplishments of main characters with lazy writing !

'Drew Karpyshyn please just die in a fire.'

People who were waiting for Revan book already bought it on release date so there's no point in even having reviews especially for bad books.But since they are already majorly disappointed in it and expressed that throughout the forums for respect in Revan I also add few sentences.

The context of the book serves no purpose since everything will be already mentioned in The Old Republic MMO.
The book SHOULD BE based mainly on REVAN,but it's NOT. First HALF of the book is mostly filler.Now, only with that said it's already inexcusable, but surprisingly it's even worse than you could think.
What happened to the Exile in this so called conclusion book was one of the most ''hilariously lazy excuses'' to end her, because author run out of better ideas.Could be he was forced to do so because MMO quest was already completed with that in mind.
Book is a disgrace to Revans name and does not justify the potential of the true force He and the Exile knows,and poorly portrays their abilities.

It's comedic how author defends he's lousy work on his mini-blog:
he says that it was obvious to expect that something bad happened to Revan after the ending of Kotor 2 already assuming how the events ''should be'' based on what he thinks.

Both canon and noncanon endings do not decide what could have happened.
Yet YOU assume it's already pointed out that Revan died,or something ''bad'' happened to him.Talking about closed minded.
He also whines how you could hardy press all material in 1 novel.Well tough luck buddy,it's you're job.
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Concerning the REAL CONLUSION OF REVAN - a.k.a. The old Republic:
In the MMO Revan is voiced,the VA really does not fit him based on how Bastilla described him in Kotor.The rough physical features and slim body is reasonable and disappointing based that he was in stasis for 3 century's.
And the way he thinks of destruction is also logical and applaudable that he still does not brake or burst with angry feelings of past events.
The Sith ENDING HOWEVER where after defeat Revan apearently dies because he's weakened and not his old self, is really a wasted opportunity.
But the fact that he does not even get some in-game cutscene after defeat shows that bioware just doesn't care about Revan or care for him just as much like Drew Karpyshyn.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Painful and Amateur, and such a waste., 1 Dec 2011
Let's face it, Drew Karpyshyn got lucky on the first Bane novel. His sequels were embarrassing and the Revan book is the worst yet.

It's a terrible read, I usually find it hard to put a book down but it is so painful trying to read this book it's shocking. Drew has taken one of Star Wars most recent loved Characters and turned him into a complete joke. I'm no author but neither is Drew... He should stick to computer games as his weak and amateur story is expected there. I own all of Drew's books, Bane was the only successful novel. Please stop now. Lucasarts should be ashamed.
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Star Wars The Old Republic - Revan
Star Wars The Old Republic - Revan by Drew Karpyshyn (Paperback - 22 Jun 2012)
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