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You are What You Imagine: 3 Steps to a New Beginning Using Imagework
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 4 May 2014
Following up her definitive book on Imagework, 'Life Choices, Life Changes', Dr Glouberman has written this new guide to using Imagework to identify and navigate a path to a fresh start or new beginning. Combining powerful Imagework exercises, (including several new ones) and meditations with a clearly defined road map; 'You are what you Imagine' will guide you through the path to deep and lasting change.

If you are feeling stuck, lost, confused, overwhelmed by possibilities or by the emptiness of knowing something is coming to an end but there is no clear way forward, please try this book. Imagework is a powerful tool for accessing your inner wisdom, shining the light on what lies 'hidden', and leading you to truth. And from there, change is possible. The exercises and meditations also work as a 'spiritual toolkit' which you can continue to use as part of a daily practice in self-alignment, or checking-in, or on an ad-hoc basis whenever you need help with a particular issue.

The book is clearly set out and highly accessible. No prior knowledge of Imagework is required to use this book. One caveat: you need to do the exercises as described, rather than just read through them, but I would advise reading the book through once first and then working your way through the exercises step-by-step. I would also suggest either recording the visualisations beforehand so you can do them uninterrupted without having to refer to the book, or if you would be detracted by the sound of your own voice, you can download recordings from the author's website.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 14 April 2014
Dina Glouberman has done it again. As with all her books, she has given me a real understanding of where I am now, how I got there, and how to find my way to my best possible future. I felt a bit lost when I started it and I've got a great positive new energy now. I love the Spiritual Gym sessions and have downloaded the MP3s to guide me through the exercises. I'm always moved by her authentic voice, her practical approach and her refusal to preach and I love the interviews and stories. This book 'does what it says on the tin' and it works!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 7 July 2014
This accessible yet inspiring road map to a New Beginning captures Dina Glouberman’s distinctive combination of wisdom with wit, practicality with aspiration. Her voice is apparent throughout – encouraging and uplifting, but not in a preachy way. ‘You Are What You Imagine’ is an entertaining, clearly written and logically conceived guide to Imagework. The exercises it includes work as a kind of spiritual tool-kit, easily followed even by a novice like me. Glouberman has an impressive track record – not only as a founder of Skyros Holidays, which offers personal development and creative writing holidays on a Greek island, but also as the renowned author of ‘Life Choices, Life Changes: Develop Your Personal Vision with Imagework’, and ‘The Joy of Burnout: How the End of the World Can Be a New Beginning’. This latest book is a worthy successor and highly recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Dina Glouberman has an international reputation in leading workshops over her technique Imagework which taps into the creative imagination. She is also well known as a founder of Skyros Holidays which offers personal development and creative writing holidays on a Greek island. The book here concentrates on Imagework and how to out it into practice.

As she explains early in the book, not everyone experiences their imagination in visual terms. Thus the word "image" is used to name certain aspects of the psyche which emerge via accessing the imagination which may still be visual, but might also be aural, or in the form of words, or even certain intuited presences which can be engaged with in a therapeutic situation or a workshop, or even on ones own. It also draws on various psychological ideas including Gestalt (see Gestalt Therapy Verbatim)and Jungian Active Imagination (see Inner Work: Using Dreams & Active Imagination for Personal Growth: Using Dreams and Active Imagination for Personal Growth) and has much to offer in its own right.

Dr Glouberman as already written about the application of Imagework in her previous books Life Choices, Life Changes: Develop Your Personal Vision with Imagework and The Joy of Burnout: How the End of the World Can Be a New Beginning. In the first she combined an number of exercises with reflections on various problems in life, which can be used to look at the psychological aspects of them be they to do with relationships, work, or even physical illnesses. The second looked at a more immediate problem, that of burnout which seems to be an increasing problem in modern society, and how Imagework can be used to turn this into a new life with opportunities and new forms of happiness.

"You Are What You Imagine" continues this theme, looking at how one can tap into the imagination and the unconscious mind to begin building a future. One of the things that marked out "Life Choices, Life Changes" from some of its rivals was the way the exercises were structured to allow access to images in the imagination, and how to come out and apply what has been learned in life. This continues here, because as is repeatedly emphasised both imagination and the material world are in certain ways real and have an effect on us. Included in this volume are also exercises as part of a "spiritual gym" with techniques to keep regular access to images, but just as important ways of ensuring one grounds oneself when coming out.

The difference to the previous books is one of emphasis. In this one Dr. Glouberman is concentrating on changes in life and adapting to them. She suggests three aspects of change, catalysts for change, turning points and new beginnings. To illustrate how these work various case studies from clients and participants in her workshops are included as as well as interviews with various luminaries such as Michael York, Robert Bly, Gabriella Roth and Ram Das. Through this she takes the reader through the journey in a way that is peppered with humour and aphorisms that sum up each stage.

At this stage, perhaps I should declare an interest, in that I have attended many of Dina Glouberman's workshops. I would go as far as to say they have helped turn my life around, and know many people who would say the same. The book is like having access to her voice outside those, yet those familiar with her methods will still find much that builds and updates her previous work. It would also serve as a good introduction to it, which might lad to reading her other volumes.

But of course there is a danger with all self-help books. As Dr. Glouberman observes early in the book, if one just reads the text, and does nothing they are of little help. The use of them comes from implementing them in one's life. In this there are various suggestions included as how to do this. These exercises could be done with a sympathetic friend or a therapist. Or perhaps going to one of the workshops- there are useful website addresses at the end to follow up if desired. Jung once suggested that a fantasy calls for action. In "You Are What You Imagine" shows how this might be put into practice.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 5 May 2014
Thank you, Dina. You have once more spun your magic web and given me exactly what I need at this moment. A gift.
Patricia
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on 21 March 2015
In Dina Glouberman's most recent book You Are What You Imagine (2014) she outlines the three-step process of managing life's bumps: catalysts, and triggering events, turning points, surrendering, and then moving into the future. Image work can be can used to help start new projects, overcome blocks, and heal wounds. It uses ‘genius’ imagination, not just everyday imagination, therefore it is ‘holistic’. You could be forgiven for having you are what you ........ (fill the gap) fatigue, as so many of these notions have been bandied about spinning us into an identity crisis: you are what you eat, you are what you see, and so on. But it is worth asking so who is running my show? My conscious or unconscious mind? If the DNA template of that resides in the imagination, then becoming familiar with your image power is a mandatory life skill, as if formulates who you are.

We are evolving beings, losing parts of ourselves: a snake sheds its skin because that skin is too tight for it, and it needs to grow beyond the old one and ‘imagine better.’ If you get stuck and dont shed this skin, you can become ill. This work can be used as preventative therapy to avoid becoming sick. She notes that successful people use imagery naturally, but so do unsuccessful people who just use different imagery, so it functions at a subliminal level. Interestingly, when we change ourselves, other people have a miraculous way of shifting alongside us, but in their own way, suggesting we are not walled off from other people. The membrane between us is permeable and porous. We just 'think' in bubbles of separateness. Other people’s images can therefore intrude on our energy and scramble it. We pick up their feelings and that blurry boundary can cause leaking energy fields. We can tune in to other people’s feelings even when we are not directly present with them. In the same Future Scenarios exercise where people operate their space ships, I like the idea of a 'decontamination shower' afterwards. It makes perfect sense, to cleanse off the resonance of the negative image.

Though it is also perversely true that some people in her sessions admit to having a leaning towards wanting that negative future. We sometimes have extreme fears of the future: painful illness, being poor, old age home, losing a loved one, grief, and financial insecurity etc. Glouberman just asks us to revision this image, and turn it perhaps into a new picture, which creates the engine towards which we flow. Usually, what holds us back is a small picture and the idea of expanding begins to take us further and beyond the confines of how we viewed the original problem. One final layer is that we are encouraged to do this with compassion and respect for our own magnificence: this is a powerful combination. Once the picture expands, people start to do something about it. Images can frighten people because it is too small or too real, but the expanded image can change your behaviour and give you renewed optimism.

She also emphasises the importance of surrender, of giving up hope for a better past when at major turning points, knowing what acts as a catalyst. People sometimes tend towards binary opposites; "in the high there is life and no death, and in the low there is death and no life" which sounds awfully close to bipolar disorder, but is common for creative types. This oscillation between extremes can lead to burnout people, a subject Glouberman has made her own, are at their best walking the path between the two visioning is not goal setting as it involves the intuition. It is holistic, not just using conscious thought processes.

While it would be very nice to think that I could go to a retreat on Skyros, in Greece, which Glouberman founded, to do more image work, the fact is you can do it sitting in your bedroom in the middle of wherever. Several exercises including the Daily Vision and the Plant, Animal, Object can be found along with sample chapters on Glouberman's website that are free to download and use.

So I don't mind being a rubber ball, or a tiger, or a rare plant, or stuck a prison cell for the sake of working through problems as I can begin to see around their corners, even to realise, there are no edges in the imagination. It's all in a day's image work.

More at https://arthealswounds.wordpress.com/2015/03/18/imagination-the-image-work-of-dina-glouberman/
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on 5 October 2014
just couldnt get into this book at all.some of it just didnt make sense to me.found it hard going in many places.
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on 5 October 2014
very good
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