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3.9 out of 5 stars9
3.9 out of 5 stars
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Format: Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
A Fork in the Road is an anthology of essays grouped round the twin themes of food and travel. The punning title gives a good clue as to the tone of the book: it is light; it is fun; it is pleasurable.

I have been reading it, wrapped in a blanket, as I watch the rain cascading down the windows obscuring the view of the trees in the garden bent double by the wind. It has lifted my spirits and the very best stories have transported me away from the sodden Marches. Tom Carson's memories of meeting real Indian food for the first time at an Indian wedding and the way it transformed him, overwhelmed me with the smell of spices in the hot, hot air. Giles Coren's first in encounter with McDonald's on American soil reminded me of my children's reaction to chocolate milkshakes in El Paso in the early seventies when we still thought McDonald's was a good thing. My heart bled for Jay Rayner marooned by the tide all afternoon in a seafood restaurant.

You can read it all at one go, but that might be considered greedy, or just dip in and out of it when you feel the need of a little something.
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Format: Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I love travel and food is in an integral part of it for me; there are meals I've eaten in destinations near and far that I will remember for ever, and I loved reading a book full of short anecdotes from varied writers sharing the same passion I do for discovering new places and flavours.

For a UK audience some of the authors in this collection from an American publisher are less familiar, however that wasn't an issue for me and I enjoyed offerings from more familiar faces like Madhur Jaffrey and the ever funny Giles Coren, who opens the tome with his journey back in time to yearning for exotic American fare in his youth in 1970's food variety poor Britain. I particularly enjoyed the chapters where I learned about food I didn't know existed (blood soup and the poisonous Fugu fish spring to mind). All in all this book was a highly enjoyable journey through foodie experiences past and present. For a little bit of escapism if, like me you enjoy food and travel in equal measures, I highly recommend this book.
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VINE VOICEon 20 March 2014
Format: Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
Short story: 34 chefs/food critics contribute their essays about encountering remarkable food that they indelicately label life changing for the purposes of hyperbole. Some play it straight. Some ham it up.

Review: But in all seriousness this is a nice little book about folks experienced in writing about food putting their story across. Its a lovely travelogue as well, most using the opportunity to describe the area where they had their wonderful meal(s). (Think AA Gill reviewing a foreign restaurant in The Times- Oh, look there is Giles Coren) There is a lovely taste of both food and place which would stir wanderlust for many who enjoy both.

I recommend highly.
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on 18 February 2014
Format: Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
A Fork in the Road is a book of essays concerning food and travel, mainly written by chefs and food writers. I have read other Lonely Planet collections such as these and I always enjoy them. It is not my favourite collection of theirs though as I did not recognise a lot of the people in the book as I think the book is aimed at the US market. It always adds to the tale if you know a little of the person first so I found myself enjoying the chapters by people I recognise more.
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Format: Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I enjoy the relaxed pace of reading other peoples food memories, particularly if the writers are knowledgable. This book brings together a wide range of writers, journalist and foodies to recount pivotal food related events in their lives. Although most of the authors were unfamiliar to me, their credentials were given and their stories were fascinating. Easy reading, some thoughtful prose and very entertaining. Definately a good read for travelling !
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 7 December 2013
Format: Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
This book, edited by food writer James Oseland, describes the moments when travellers encounter 'life changing' tastes. The travellers in question are 34 chefs, food writers or just writers, some of whom I'd heard of - Giles Coren, Jay Rainer, Kuai Hart Hemmings, Madhur Jaffrey - most of the others I hadn't heard of as the book seems mainly aimed at the American market, although to be fair there are contributors from several countries. (The Alan Rickman who appears here is a food writer and not the actor!) The stories are relatively short, 7-9 pages on average, and begin with a short biography of the author - "Daniel Vaughn is the barbecue editor of the Texas Monthly Magazine and author of 'The prophets of smoked meats: a journey through Texas barbecue'..."

Although I am not really a 'foodie' I did enjoy the book and found it interesting, even though just the concept of 'life changing tastes' makes my hackles rise. There is a great variety in the stories from writers who play it for laughs, to those who describe surprising discoveries and those sharing their heart-felt culinary and travel enthusiasms. As is the case with similar books, some stories are very engaging, funny or genuinely inspiring while others are just annoying and reinforce my prejudices against foodies as people with too much money and time on their hands. However, this is a good book to dip in and out of - if one story doesn't appeal the next one probably will- and it would make great holiday reading or an interesting Christmas present for a foodie friend. Three and a half stars.
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VINE VOICEon 31 December 2013
Format: Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
A group of fairly unfamiliar (to me) foodies relate short stories of food & travels.

This a fairly average book that lacks the visual design of some of Lonely Planet's other books, such as Food Lover's Guide to the World: Experience the great global cuisines (Lonely Planet Food and Drink). If you are looking for sumptuous design to stimulate the tastebuds then I would suggest that would be a better purchase. This title, instead perhaps compensates for the editorial lack in those larger scale visual books in regard to a better sense of writing. What we have here is more akin to a selection of foodies newspaper columns; first person accounts and critiques (nothing really review based, but more anecdotal experiences).

Perhaps in the future Lonely Planet could attempt to merge the two styles.

A decent book, but nothing overly exciting.
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TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICEon 19 December 2013
Format: Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
I have enjoyed dipping into this book, which as other reviewers have pointed out is a collection of short essays on memorable food experiences.

What a great idea.

So, the concept is a good one, however the world is not only made up of America, and the majority of the Chefs in this book (with a few notable exceptions) are American.

Now I would be happy for them to be unknown chefs, say from Poland, Argentina or Iceland as they would bring a cultural element to the book.

However it seems this is a book for Americans, which has been shipped over here, and for that reason I am afraid it is only given 2 stars, however that said, it is an entertaining "dip into now and again" book.
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Format: Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
A collection of essays/articles by well-known food writers and chefs, edited by James Oseland and published by Lonely Plant Travel.

This is an interesting and varied selection of short stories / essays and each writer shares their personal experiences of both food and of travel.

I'll admit that I am not familiar with many of those who contribute to this collection, the majority of whom are from the USA, but on the whole this is an entertaining read. Probably best enjoyed as a 'dip in and out' sort of experience, rather than a book that one would read straight through.

Anyone who is interested in food, and likes to read about different cultures will enjoy this.
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