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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on 5 July 2010
Got back from Turkey after a 2 week road trip holiday in east, central and the east mediteranean coast. I chose this book purely because it's the most up to date one available in the market and kind of covers where we are going. Most of the reviews in the book are relatively ok and lots of things have changed since they did last research. Most hotels are still there and cost has risen up. Overall, the book is written very sparsely but it's difficult as you may end up a 3 volume guide to Turkey. The maps were ok but not brilliant. It certainly caters mostly for travellers who are less mobile than us in the car. So there were hardly any information on travelling in East Mediteranean (like Mersin, Anamur etc) in the car and similarly in the middle like Afyon. Pretty useless - comments like it's better if you have a car so you can see more (But then the more bit just kind of trails off). Nevertheless, as far as standards of LP it achieves its basic level of expectation; a map, a brief description, places to stay and eat. But if you want more than the basic, I suggest look up for more specialist stuff than at this book. For a bog standard LP guidebook, this rates 3/5. Would I suggest you buy it? If you need the one book for your trip and not worry having to lug other books, I would. But if you have extra spaces for other books, then I suggest get something else.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on 30 May 2009
I bought this Lonely Planet guide to Turkey as it was the most recently published book that I could find before my visit to the country during April 2009. I was so glad to have bought it!!
The book is informative, easy to navigate, contained helpful up-to-date advice & recommendations and included some great photographs. If you're looking for a pocket sized guide however this is not the book to choose as it's fairly heavy to carry around with you!
I had a great holiday in Turkey (I visited Ephesus amongst other places, whilst staying in Selcuk/Kusadasi) and I'm now reading up on other sections of the book in preperation for my next visit!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 4 September 2009
I first visited Turkey in 1984, and fell in love with the place and the people. The following year the first edition of Turkey A Travel Survival Kit was published and it instantly became my bible for exploring all over the country. This summer I spent a week in the Kackar Mountains in north-east Turkey (a new area for me), and took the new edition with me. It is so full of information and tips it is an indispensible guide when you are there, but it's so readable I frequently dip into it to check a fact or get up to date information on places still on my list to visit, or to re-live experiences from earlier trips. Without doubt the best guide book to Turkey! Don't go without it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 13 August 2010
This book is easy to use and gives you all the information you need to find your way to the most interesting places.
I bought it to find my way around Istanbul without paying for a tour. With a family of 6 it has already saved me £360 and I've only used it once! It is also interesting reading and having succeessfully navigated Istanbul - it tells you how to use the tram ( approx 70p per journey)- I now intend to plan future trips to other parts of Turkey. This book is one of the best things I've bought all year.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 18 July 2011
If you are travelling to Turkey on a holiday and going to the major tourist destinations (Istanbul, Cappadocia etc...) then this book will probably be absolutely fine and sufficient for all your holiday needs. However, if you are travelliing independently around and across and further afield then you are going to be a little bit annoyed at all the information that has not been included. It was the lesser known, really useful information on more remote or less frequented places that used to set these guide books apart from the rest and that is what one expects from a Lonely Planet. Probably still the best guide book around but if you are intrepid and especially if you are headed into eastern Turkey you are going to have to do a bit more of your own research to accompany this guide book! I still recommend it though!
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on 20 February 2011
I brought this for my Kindle, which I find a lot easier to travel with, rather than the heavy paper version.

Having spent the last 12 years travelling through Turkey with 2 previous editions of the Rough Guide to Turkey, it's good to have an alternative guide this time around. Sure, the historic information is much the same (and just as accurate) but the perspective is refreshingly different. This is my only Lonely Planet book to date and I think it's aimed at a younger (back-packer) audience than the more age-generic Rough Guide is. I do struggle with some of the slang which is used, although I'm 'only' 38! This doesn't get in the way of the book's purpose however.

Regarding the Kindle version, I think this book really needs some improvements: The "click here" links in the book seem to take you to random locations, and the maps are, frankly, useless on the Kindle's screen. Maybe they could make available some full screen PDF versions of the maps to accompany the book? The pagination seems odd at times on my Kindle 3, but you can work past this to get the content. Keeping photograph titles and credit lines in the text, whilst excluding the actual photograph is ridiculous!

Bottom line - a guide book no better or worse than the Rough Guide equivalent, but if you need proper maps buy the paper version.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 25 October 2009
This book is a really helpful book when it comes to traveling. The amount of detail on how you can get from one place to another is really helpful. I used it allot when traveling from Istanbul down the coast and into the Cappadocia area. The book covers allot of subjects, leading to that some of the things mentioned are not that well covered. This is specially when it comes to sights like Ephisos and other similar. The descriptions of the places are not wherry informative and the maps of the sights tell you wherry little.

The conclusion is that this book is wherry useful when it comes to traveling around. But when you are looking at specific sights its not much use other than telling you how to get there and away. However, there are usually more information on the sights itself so you wont be that lost. The maps are quite simple and contain only the bare minimum. This I think is sad, since maps can be a wherry good way of showing information over a city and other places in a easy way. But overall, I would never travel to Turkey again without this book it is far more useful than it is luggage.
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on 14 July 2009
This is a nicely laid out travel guide with tonnes of information. It isn't a pocket guide, but perfect for pre trip planning & keeping in the hotel for reference. The layout, maps & content's good & up-to-date (Jul 09), but I would have liked a lot more photographs to entice me. I liked the multitude of quirky bits of info/sights to see which makes for a more rounded & less mainstream tourist reference point. I like getting of the beaten track & there was some sensible suggestions. The key attractions were well covered & I liked the fact that a broad overview of the history & people are provided to illustrate the importance & back ground of historical places & sights. There's also a magnitude of practical information & tips included from how to barter to how to order food or find a hotel in Turkish. Another good guide out of the Lonely Planet stable!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 15 October 2009
As always, a helpful and informative guide to travelling a country as a non-typical tourist. Some important information was missing however about bus times and prices etc. Still wouldn't be without it on my travels!
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on 19 December 2009
It's very obvious when you first start reading this guide that it's aimed at the wealthy traveller. It's written from the perspective of people who are having everything paid for, do not need to save money, and therefore focus on the aesthetics rather than the bare essentials and value, whether its eating, sleeping or sightseeing. Phrases like "It's inevitable you'll buy some sort of carpet when you're in Turkey" (under the 'highlights' section) do not seem to have the books largest demographic in mind, 18-25 year old backpackers.

Many of the hotel descriptions focus on the appearance of the rooms and furnishings, not the things that matter like helpfullness of staff, safety, noise levels etc., and this is in the budget section! You just have to assume that as they've not brought them up these things are fine- but that's not always the case. You almost get the feeling they went in, took a look around, wrote down some notes on the decor and then checked in at the upmarket hotel down the road. Who can blame them I guess, if lonely planet is paying you might as well take the luxury option.

Which brings me to another point; the upmarket sections are given far more space than the budget sections than in any other guide I've read, sometimes there's only one or two budget options. They also need to be far more conservative with the flowery language so that they could fit more useful stuff in. Our lives would have been so much easier with some bigger maps that actually had all the road names on, rather than just about a third of them. Other than these criticisms, I suppose the guide was helpful in finding some hotels and eateries, but in all honesty we'd have saved a lot of money and time just asking the locals for reccomendations/directions instead.

I'll leave you with some sample descriptions (with nothing ommited, it's all there) of BUDGET hotels, in Malatya and Antep:

"'Soviet tenement' springs to mind upon first sight of the greyish, peeling facade, but give this central abode a chance for it was undergoing a much need freshening up at the time of writing. When we checked in, brand-new mattresses were stacked next to the reception, which bodes well. The breakfast room boasts contempory furnishings and a flat-screen TV" - Hotel Yeni Sinan. Well at least we know what it looks like.

"As far as physical beauty goes, this is a real plane Jane, but it's a secure place to hang your rucksack, the rates are good, and it's handily set in the centre of town. It features anodyne rooms with well scrubbed bathrooms (but please upgrade the boarding school style furnishings). The breakfast room is windowless" - Yunus Hotel. Man I hate boarding school style furnishings, this was definitely a no-go.

"The decor's a bit blah, and the carpets are tatty, but the bathrooms are kept in fine fettle and location is primo. Oh, and there's the Gulluoglu pastry shop on the ground floor." - Hotel Gulluoglu. Wow, if there's anything I hate more than boarding school style furnishings, it's blah decor and tatty carpets. But a pastry shop on the ground floor?! I'm sold.
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