Customer Reviews


4 Reviews
5 star:
 (2)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 
Most Helpful First | Newest First

5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Buy, visit, enjoy!, 3 Aug. 2008
By 
Steve Keen "therealus" (Herts, UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Toronto (Lonely Planet City Guides) (Paperback)
Not sure if I'd ever have visited Toronto had it not been for a family connection, but if not I'd have been missing a great city. As Lonely Planet hints, this is a city with a real penchant for the arts, fine and popular (the open air stage beside Lake Ontario had free concerts on an Indian theme during my stay); sports (during my time there I saw a CFL game which included one of the best trick plays I ever saw, there were at least three MLB games featuring the above par Blue Jays, and West Ham United were beaten by an MLS dream team including David Beckham - sold out, naturally - at BMO Stadium); and shopping, from mainstream (Eaton Centre) to bohemian (the Harbourside World Market). It further mentions the underground labyrinth of subways, well suited to a city which freezes solid in winter and roasts in summer, which also features a wealth of shops and food courts.

I can recommend at least one of its picks for food, Barberian's Steak House - great menu, but no sign of Sharon Stone. LP also reports on Pier 4 down on the waterfront: that's the name of the whole building, but for service at table go into the Wallymagoo's part, a specialist seafood restaurant where they do a bargain lobster deal, great burgers, and other stuff, though the treat for me was the Halibut Fish and Chips, with two pieces of deep-fried battered halibut plus fries costing less than the price of the raw fish would come to in the UK.

The guide checks the Radisson on the waterfront, which has a dysfunctional key system but is generally good, though expensive; it now has attached to it Shoeless Joe's, a bar which seemed to be full of biker gang types when I went in there. But in Canadian fashion, they were well-behaved biker gang types.

Also for drinking, the Bier Markt on the Esplanade is shown on the map but I couldn't find a reference elsewhere. This is an amazing drinking establishment, with an encyclopaedic menu of beers from around the world. Not shown anywhere that I could find was Montana's, a nightclub which amazingly doesn't charge on the door. But now I'm going to let you down and admit I have no idea what street it's in. Sorry, it's just downtown and close enough to the Radisson to walk. Or stagger.

The Islands, as suggested, are well worth checking out. The guide on our boat informed us, incidentally, that Yonge Street, which begins at the Toronto Star downtown, is the longest street in the world. It certainly seems to be the longest continuous stripmall, with shops along its route at least as far as Newmarket, about 30 miles out.

And of course, no visit to Toronto would be complete without that trip up the CN Tower, though I think LP has the opening time, at 10am, slightly wrong, as I was on the lift up by that time, and once up there joined a bunch of other folks who'd clearly been there for a while.

The letdown of the book I guess is the Excursions part, which is limited mostly to Niagara-related places (Falls, Wine). Unfortunately again I'm going to let you down and recommend a couple of places so far away they are more like Expeditions than Excursions: Algonquin Park, 200-odd kilometres north, and the Bruce Peninsula, at least as far with a four or five hour drive to get you there. It's magnificently wild, though, and Tobermory, on the northern tip, feels as isolated as its namesake in the Scottish Isles.

Offsetting that, however, just for once in an LP the maps are worth having, though admittedly it can't be that hard producing a map of a city designed on a grid system.

Conclusion. As usual with LP, mostly well worth having, and definitely an item which will help you get the most out of Toronto.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Toronto - Lonely Planet City Guide, 25 Feb. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Toronto (Lonely Planet City Guides) (Paperback)
It does not need me to tell you how good Lonely Planet Guides are if you have purchased any before.
I bought this, second hand, in good condition for a third of the price.
I would highly recommend this book, it has ALL you need as a guide.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars First Visit to Toronto, 13 Jun. 2009
By 
Mr. Gordon Nuttall (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Toronto (Lonely Planet City Guides) (Paperback)
Detailed, relevant, lively and accurate - I hope it will be equally accurate! Information on CN Tower, Niagara, transport and restaurative facilities have already proved very useful. Can't wait to put the info to the test!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect for visiting Toronto, 17 Oct. 2008
By 
This review is from: Toronto (Lonely Planet City Guides) (Paperback)
I found the LP guide perfect for my recent visit to Toronto. As with all LP books it's layout is very easy to use and it's written in a very readable style.

I really enjoyed the city itself. There aren't that many "must visit" sights, CN Tower being the obvious one. I really enjoyed the islands, with their brilliant view of the city, but they are basically a park and that mightn't be your thing. We also went to the Hockey Hall of Fame and baseball game (not a match!) at Rogers Field.

I found the book very good in recommending some nice parts of the city to visit, such as Cabbagetown and Chinatown. These are nice areas just to wander through on a nice day.
We were visitng relatives so we didn't need the book to recommend places to eat and drink though there were plenty listed.

In summary a lovely city and this is the perfect book to use when visiting it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Toronto (Lonely Planet City Guides)
Toronto (Lonely Planet City Guides) by Natalie Karneef (Paperback - 1 July 2007)
Used & New from: £29.78
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews