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4.7 out of 5 stars75
4.7 out of 5 stars
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on 30 March 2014
The book consists of three parts. First there is a theory section where the classification of people into employed (e), self-employed (s), business owners (b) and investors (i) is introduced, along with presenting highly useful and interesting classification of seven levels of investors. The second part deals with the issue of how a persons thinking has to change in order to change from going from the left side (e-i) of the classification scheme to the right side (b-i). The final part is a seven step programme explaining what to do in order to achieve the change.

The book is an excellent sequel to RICH DAD POOR DAD in the sense that it repeats the key points from the previous book but tells the story in a slightly different way through the use of the four quadrants. Although it is primarily motivational rather than technical, the text contains some interesting statistics and ideas that should be very useful for improving cash-flow management in a manner that can be numerically evaluated and thus make it possible to predict when financial freedom will be reached.

Just like the first book, it is written in a highly entertaining manner with highly useful diagrams and examples. It should be good motivation for further investigations into the world of mathematical finance ("financial engineering").
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 23 December 2014
This is just a clever rehash of the original "Rich Dad, Poor Dad" effort.

It's yet another mass market book offering pithy financial advice mainly for the American market. You might find it thin when it comes to actual specifics.

Kiyosaki and Lechter use the literary device of a "Rich Dad" and a "Poor Dad" and "cashflow quadrants" to get their message across in a simplistic format. It's designed to be an extremely easy read as an introduction to financial matters for the average person. Nothing too taxing (pun intended) here. They set out to create yet another beginner's guide to finances. Aware that most people would rather watch paint dry than try and tackle their finances, they made it readable. VERY readable.

It is easy for the more financially literate to scoff at these books. But Kiyosaki and Lechter must have succeeded in their aims as this book also went on to become a major best seller. So they obviously tapped into something. There is a need for good, solid financial education on the way this wicked world really works. Are the authors suitably qualified to provide this information? K and L provide some useful information. It could be better too - but the authors aren't going to go into any great pesky details. Why ruin some good anecdotes?

And there's the rub. Kiyosaki is mainly a motivational guru with an eye on finance. Do you want to take actual financial advice from a cheerleader? That's your decision to make. I should be careful if I were you.

You should also be careful when you are advised to drop your college education. Our society is undergoing more technological transformation. A good education, not the lack of it, will come in useful to adapt to this. Future opportunities may arise that have not been present before.

In the plus column, it should be said that these books at least get the average person to THINK about their finances. Perhaps that is their saving grace.
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I read Rich Dad, Poor Dad a few years ago and I enjoyed it. This book contains the same concepts in a different format. The premise is that there are four quadrant (Employee, Self-employed, Investor, Business Owner). The author describes the characteristics (stereotypes) linked to people belonging to each quadrant. He then explains that you require a mind shift to go from one quadrant to the other. There is an attempt to tell you how to do this (not a step by step guide). A lot of the info applies mainly to the US (401K, tax savings, etc). It is OK if you have not read the original book on this topic written by the same author, otherwise it is just a repetition of the same concepts, reshuffled in a different format. Not very impressed.
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on 17 September 2012
There are millions of books on finances. Most of them regurgitating the same old stuff. Either text book boring work harder stuff or visualisation hippy ethereal stuff. This however, is the up-to-date, bang on and eye opening truth about why the Rich / Poor divide is growing massively and how to hop on to the right side of the divide. There's rumours of Robert being a shady character etc. - this may be true but you cannot deny that some of the information he shares in this book is invaluable to anyone who has worked their whole life trying to make ends meet. If this is you, you need the information in this book.
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on 17 March 2015
Robert Kiyosaki advocates financial literacy, which explain - in part - why those who win the lottery may all lose it if their mentality belongs in the wrong quadrants. Divided in 4 types, Robert Kiyosaki explains each category and gives his opinion on how you become financially free in each quadrant. This is a follow-up to RICH DAD, POOR DAD and might sound repetitive at times, but isn't it how we learn? By repetition, we might pay attention to certain things we missed out first time around. Essential reading for those in network marketing...
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on 18 July 2012
Not on a par with Rich Dad. You get the feeling the book could've been about half the length, as the same old message gets repeated time and time again. However, it does serve as a reinforcement. Well written and compelling, but perhaps a bit short of fact. It is more of a motivation aid which is fine, but also it's a sales pitch for the Rich Dad empire and other services they offer. Worth a read, but not a classic in this field.
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on 24 May 2015
I'm so excited to get going, but I know I have a long journey ahead ax I have never had any financial education before, but I'm committed to take control and change the quadrant I'm in right now as it makes no sense to work so hard,and never get anywhere.
Thank you for being so open and honest on how you and Kim got to achieve financial freedom.
Anyone who thought they were living the right way may need to read this.
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on 28 October 2013
I had to read this book with a pen and paper handy as it kept making me think of new ideas and goals I wanted to set for myself. As a small business owner, it really gave me food for thought about the future direction of my business. The title alone sounds confusing and possibly off-putting but the book was easy to follow and I would highly recommend it.
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on 12 May 2014
I finally finished to read this book
I found it very interesting and eye opener to the financial world
I guess this book is for more open minded people that is willing to learn and make changes to the financial site of your life
I loved this book, I have learned few important points and I will recommend it to anybody
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on 12 November 2014
I read rich dad poor dad and was skeptical about purchasing this one in case there was repetition. This book is so much more in depth than rich dad poor dad. It has opened my eyes even wider. I completely recommend this book to anyone who is serious about changing their life and getting out of that job.
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