Customer Reviews


2 Reviews
5 star:    (0)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 
Most Helpful First | Newest First

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A book for a more comprehensive perspective on the present, past and future, 20 May 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Father of Us All: War and History, Ancient and Modern (Hardcover)
My review is not meant to comment/argue on the empirical facts and arguments made by the author, but more a final touch to the average conservative who is deciding on whether or not to buy this book.

This book is a great read, entertaining, informative and challenging your preconceptions in a way that leaves you smirking when hearing political commentators on television or reading the newspapers.

I read through this book in about 3 days while on holiday in Spain and it one of the more memorable aspects of my vacations(and it was a great vacation really). Victor Davis Hanson has a great mind for analogies, and it's a mindblowing delight having the realization that the human faults that plague us today are timeless. And for all the external cultural, educational and sociological stimulus we are not really more intelligent today and that the most celebrated intellects of today are more immature and naive than great public figures 3000 years ago.

If you are looking for new perspective and more mature comprehension of history and present, while relaxing in your house or reading on a plane then this is a excellent addition to your personal library.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars I suspect that he holds Napoleon in higher regard than would a British historian but it is no bad thing to force the latter to r, 24 Nov. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The Author's points about the need to teach military history are very valid and his criticisms of the mindset that confuses understanding it with militarism is most valid. My principal reason for giving four rather than five stars is an over-reliance on the American experience. He does use some examples from other countries and wars, in particular he has valid points about the Falklands War and he obviously finds Napoleon a fascinating study, clearly distinguishing between his invasion of Russia and why it failed (for which many thanks) and that by Hitler, with the latter's inability to appreciate the lessons that History offers; had Hitler understood why Napoleon, despite his superb skills as a military leader, failed to conquer Russia, then the outcome of Hitler's evil assault on an apparent ally might have been different. Clearly we are all most grateful that Hitler did not understand (or even regard) History's lessons, but this Author gives a deep historical context for all this. I suspect that he holds Napoleon in higher regard than would a British historian but it is no bad thing to force the latter to re-evaluate Napoleon's qualities, while still remaining grateful that at the last Napoleon's dream for European hegemony failed just as surely as Hitler's. However, I do feel that there is a presumption that the American view is the only valid one, particularly in such historical cases as the overthrow of a legitimate (in the context of that time) British governance for the 13 colonies; I fully accept that it was almost bound to happen, and that in general the outcome has been good for both the world and what now constitutes the USA, but I think that he could ask if a solution like that found in Canada might have offered an alternative way forward, avoided debacles like the American torching of an innocent Canadian city and the retaliation that led to a conflagration in Washington and America's subsequent cavalier attitude to Spanish and Mexican claims on California and other territories in the south west of what is now the USA.. On the other hand his take on the war in Vietnam, while not now a popular one, is still valid; the regime in South Vietnam had multiple defects, but so did that in South Korea, and the latter has, as the Author recognises, evolved into a decent democracy; he validly infers that there is no good reason to suppose that the fledgling South Vietnam's tentative attempt to find a democratic path would not have enjoyed similar success, and he clearly and properly dislikes the authoritarian regime that stifles today's Vietnam. The book is giving me much to think about and is forcing me to revalue some old assumptions.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Father of Us All: War and History, Ancient and Modern
The Father of Us All: War and History, Ancient and Modern by Victor Davis Hanson (Hardcover - 7 Jun. 2010)
£14.89
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews