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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic book
There was a time I was playing with vegetarians diet. Not any more. My health is more important than any idea.
Most vegetarian should read this book and then make a choice.
I read it in one day.
Published 21 days ago by eva

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334 of 364 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing
I want to be clear about a few things:

1) I am a female.
2) I give the idea of this book 5 stars, but its execution 1.
3) I have been a radical vegan, a rabid meat-eater and everything in between (currently in the in-between)
4) I am working on an archaeological PhD on hunter-gatherer diets, subsistence, hunting and transition to...
Published on 5 Jun 2010 by A. Perri


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13 of 23 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Very poor, 8 Nov 2011
This review is from: Vegetarian Myth, The (Paperback)
I was very disappointed with this book. Like others have said it is based on highly selected and very dubious evidence and is at best pseudoscience.
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9 of 17 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Complete and Utter Lies, 24 July 2012
By 
SJ (California) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Vegetarian Myth, The (Paperback)
I hate when people make money off of lies, especially when their lies jeopardize people's health. This book is full of nonsense. Some of the claims, such as humans cannot digest plant protein, are completely laughable. It is truly sad that a person and a publishing company would knowing publish something so deceptive.
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9 of 17 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars COMPLETE AND UTTER RUBBISH, 20 July 2012
This review is from: Vegetarian Myth, The (Paperback)
Is this woman for real?! I have no doubt this product has been sponsored by the meat and dairy industry somewhere down the line. Complete piffle, unsubstantiated pseudo science.
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31 of 56 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential for anyone interested in nutrition and food politics, 13 Mar 2010
This review is from: Vegetarian Myth, The (Paperback)
I'm not a vegetarian and have had no thoughts about stopping eating meat. I came across Lierre Keith on Jimmy Moore's low-carb blog interview and was so intrigued that I ordered this book. It is definitely the best book I've read so far this year.

Lierre lived as a vegan for twenty years because she wanted her food to come without any death attached and she recounts her experiences trying to grow her own food, ultimately coming to the realisation that in any form of food production comes the inevitable death of some life form. Her summing up the life=death equation as a self-completing and ever-renewing circle, rather than a food chain, is inspired and a cornerstone of the book's philosophy. All the while her diet, lacking in the essential nutrients, causes her body to break down.

The book is split into a small number of chapters, each dealing with a particular angle on the vegetarian's argument. The claim that vegetarianism is more environmentally friendly is annihilated with the details of how the Earth's topsoil has been eaten away by agriculture. In the section dealing with politics she goes on to describe the massive power held by the grain corporations. The chapter on nutrition is also comprehensive and written well enough for a lay person to understand.

I'd certainly recommend it for any vegetarian open-minded enough to consider another side to their argument, but also to anyone interested in nutrition and where their food comes from. It's not an excuse for committed carnivores to beat their chest and look down on their vegetarian brethren, but a more factually complete look at how we've affected our planet and how what we eat really affects us.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Misinformation, 28 Mar 2014
This review is from: Vegetarian Myth, The (Paperback)
I couldn't believe how much misinformation is in this book, and personal opinions. I don't agree with Mz Keith. A life on a plant based diet is key to saving our planet for destruction.

You must watch this film. Mz Keith appears in the film, but it shows humanity for the cancer/virus that it really is.

[...]

YOu can buy all the green products and recycle till you are blue in the face. The single largest impact you can have on the environment is to eat vegan.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars thumbs down, 6 Oct 2013
This review is from: Vegetarian Myth, The (Paperback)
I had no opinion on the subject but was merely recommended this book by a friend. I really did not care for the book, I found it to be poorly researched, full of bias and as said below "cherry picked" "facts".
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18 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars beautifully written, passionately argued and startlingly thought provoking, 19 July 2010
By 
Paul Mitchell-Gears (BogotŠ, Colombia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Vegetarian Myth, The (Paperback)
I don't know if this book will change my eating habits. It will however definitely change my thinking habits forever, and what more can you ask for from a book.

Vegetarians and meat-eaters alike: read it. It almost certainly isn't saying what u expect it to say - and for that alone deserves respect. Give it to your children to read. Let them understand that there's a lot to be done to make the world a better place, and giving up meat eating is actually not as effective as it is popular.
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20 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brave, bold & beautifully written book, 27 May 2011
By 
This review is from: Vegetarian Myth, The (Paperback)
The reviews say everything - people either love this book or hate it - I loved it and I was a vegetarian for 15 years so I can understand why people hate it. I know that there was a time when I would have hated it, but I don't know how I could have countered any of the arguments presented.

The book is beautifully written and beautifully structured. There are 3 arguments presented for being vegetarians/vegans (the line is just drawn in a different place by every one of us dogs/cows/chicken/fish/eggs/dairy/leather shoes/from my garden etc):
1) A moral argument - we must not kill;
2) A political argument - we can only feed the world if we are all vegetarian;
3) A nutritional argument - it is healthier to be vegetarian/vegan.

Keith takes each one in turn and breaks them down with searing logic.
1) There is nothing in this world that we can eat for which nothing has died. She will even tell you how many wolves and bison have died for grain fields and how many rivers have been run dry and all life within them eradicated to irrigate those grain/soy fields. Rabbits, mice, buffalo, fish, birds - before we get into the millions of species in topsoil being trashed as I write.

2) How can the agriculture that has destroyed, and continues to destroy, the planet be a sustainable way to feed the world? Without ruminants performing biological functions of soil, plants soon die as the soil structure is destroyed. Are vegetarians OK that your food is made from oil, not soil? What will feed your food when the fossil fuel runs out? Areas where vegans and real food fans should be having heated agreement are explored - we all abhor factory farming. Ruminants can't digest grains and should not be fed them - ever (the same likely applies to humans however!)

3) The nutritional argument takes many different beliefs and knocks each of these down in turn. As a nutritionist myself, I always knew that there was NO nutritional argument for avoiding meat and fish, let alone eggs and dairy. During my time as a vegetarian I thought I could be healthy enough - I was wrong. Keith was even more wrong, as a vegan, and will suffer the health consequences for the rest of her life. Retinol, B12, vitamin D, K2, calcium, iron, zinc are not optional and they are difficult to get for vegetarians and some are impossible for vegans. As for fat and cholesterol - there are entire books written on those.
In whose interests is it that you eat hydrogenated, deodorized, emulsified, bleached vegetable oils and not butter? Who wants you eating sugary cereal for breakfast and not eggs? Who wants you eating their grains and a ready made sauce and not sticking a free range chop from your known-by-name farmer under the grill?

"What separates me from vegetarians isn't ethics, or commitment. It's information." says Keith. And we can read this book and gain the same level of information. We can still choose to be vegetarian, or vegan, but recognize that it is a personal choice and not a moral high ground from which to attack others, because there are no logical arguments - it's a personal choice. Whatever we choose - let it be an informed choice. No one on earth can like the piercing messages of this book - we have destroyed the planet and there are way too many people to feed (possibly 100 times too many). We should all be as angry as Keith is with those who think it has been OK to trash the planet during their infinitesimally small time as guests here - for their own greed and personal gain.

Love it or hate it - I highly recommend that you read it.
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8 of 16 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The Vegetarian Myth, 21 July 2012
This review is from: Vegetarian Myth, The (Paperback)
This is the least factual book I have ever read of this type. It's not based on any type of empirical findings or scholarly writings. The author is pulling things out of the air just for the purpose of writing a book that will sell because it is controversial. I was looking forward to getting a real education about nutrition and vegetarianism but instead I got a lot of opinion and emotion. Save a tree and don't buy this book.
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6 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Essential reading, especially for people who care about the planet and their health, 6 Jan 2012
This review is from: Vegetarian Myth, The (Paperback)
This book is essential reading for anyone who cares about the environment and their own health. Written by a person who's about as eco-nutty as you can get. She was a vegan for years and years (and if you know the type of person who goes vegan, you know the level of fundamentalist eco-nuttiness this takes) and despite putting tons of effort into it, wrecked her health with it, and was devastated to realise there's no such thing as a vegetarian field and how agriculture is destroying the earth way faster than grazing or hunting would. Oh, and also she puts to rest the old whole myth about "farming animals is a waste of crops and a pound of meat takes this much grain", revealing that it's only based on hideous factory farming and feeding cows food they're not meant to eat, like wheat and soy--if they ate grass, there wouldn't be a problem and in addition to that, keeping cows isn't nearly as disastrous to topsoil as agriculture is. And then there's the nutritional problem wherein human hunter-gatherer genes sit uneasily with human ethics where we developed such a high level of compassion we started to have problems eating animals--except that biologically speaking, vegetarianism isn't really the best option for homo sapiens (something I already knew from a paleontological perspective). She's done tons of research on this and the annotations alone are staggering.

It's a really, really good book and I admit, I cried several times while reading it, because I share that deep, spiritual anguish about the state of the world and the passionate love of nature she does. And had to give up being a vegetarian because my health simply could not take it (and like me, she found paleo/low-carb was the optimal style of nutrition from an evolutionary point of view and managed to regain some of her health through it). So it's definitely written by one of us tree-hugging feminist hippies and not one of these macho prats wearing "carnivore" t-shirts who use paleo as an excuse for violence and not caring about other living creatures. While an ecofeminist myself, I'm not as extreme in my views as Keith is, but it's wonderful to finally see paleo described from the perspective of a compassionate, liberal woman and not some tough libertarian/conservative guy. If anyone brings compassion and awareness of the interconnectedness of all life into meat-eating, this woman does. She suggests a spiritual approach to eating what you were biologically meant to eat--being aware of your part in the food chain and realising that life always feeds on life. Vegetable or animal, something always has to die so something else can keep on living.

Sadly, I suspect that the people who need to read The Vegetarian Myth the most will never pick it up and will judge it without even reading it. Even though it's important reading for just about everyone, especially for us environmentalists. That's one of the main reasons why it made me cry, pretty much--even with my background in nutritional geekery, I was devastated by the amount of rubbish she revealed about common veggie myths (so it's even more difficult to be around well-meaning, compassionate and environmentally passionate, animal-loving people who've never questioned the stuff). And of course, I doubt humankind can abandon agriculture, so it was even more horrifying to read exactly how many species and vast areas of land it's killed so far with the damming of rivers and draining of fields and felling of forests and to know this will probably go on until the entire planet is destroyed. And how much can an individual human being do? How to balance the planet's wellbeing and your own health and to exercise compassion towards all living beings when you've got hunter-gatherer genes? These aren't easy questions, and she doesn't even pretend to give easy answers. But it's definitely a book worth reading. It was a depressing book at times, but then again, all the truly important ones are.
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Vegetarian Myth, The
Vegetarian Myth, The by Lierre Keith (Paperback - 4 Feb 2010)
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