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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A well written book, slightly unfortunate title
'Northern Tradition for the Solitary Practitioner: A Book of Prayer, Devotional Practice, and the Nine Worlds of Spirit' sounds like it would concern itself primarily with the practice of a kind of pan-Heathenry in a solitary manner and context. However, this is not what the book is about at all; in fact the book describes in some detail the importance of solitary...
Published on 8 Feb 2009 by Customer

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars This should have been so much better
Northern Tradition is a good book and well worth a read. However I felt the author spent too much time alternating between preaching her corner and looking over her shoulder to see what the rest of the Heathern community thought of her work.

Galina's writing style reflects that often used by Heathern authors and can come across as lecturing and brittle. I found...
Published on 16 May 2011 by Galdorman


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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A well written book, slightly unfortunate title, 8 Feb 2009
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This review is from: Northern Tradition for the Solitary Practitioner: A Book of Prayer, Devotional Practice, and the Nine Worlds of Spirit: A Book of Prayer, Devotional Practice, and the Nine Worlds of the Spirit (Paperback)
'Northern Tradition for the Solitary Practitioner: A Book of Prayer, Devotional Practice, and the Nine Worlds of Spirit' sounds like it would concern itself primarily with the practice of a kind of pan-Heathenry in a solitary manner and context. However, this is not what the book is about at all; in fact the book describes in some detail the importance of solitary devotionals and prayer, not solitary blots or symbels etc. The title should have better reflected that -- that is not to dent the inherent worth of the book which I heartily recommend! I just think the title is going to give people unreasonable expectations as to its content.

The book is well written in clear concise prose and I enjoyed reading it. The authors obviously put a lot of work into the piece but I did feel that they spent far too much time discussing the various niggles and negatives of the Heathen community. For the beginner it would certainly scare them off! I would recommend that whoever ends up reading it to just plough on through the first few chapters because it does pick up. One good thing about the book is that authors quote some very insightful observations from members of said community and quite a few of them give note worthy pointers for solo practice.

The contents is as follows: Introduction, The Northern Tradition Landscape, The Evolution of Practice, Core Cosmology, Meditation and Prayer, Prayer Beads, Solitary Rites, Altar Work and God Posts, Doing the Work, The Conundrum of Words, Epilogue and Appendix: Deity Altars and Offerings.

Even though this book was co-authored by Galina Krasskova it really isn't like her other book (Exploring the Northern Tradition which is an excellent beginners introduction to Heathenry). 'Northern Tradition for the Solitary Practitioner' discusses certain parts of religion, namely prayer, altars, ethics, offerings and personal devotionals in considerable detail -- making the book most valuable for those past the beginners stage and who are working on integrating the religion into their daily life. It will also be useful to those attempting to understand the importance of prayer and maintaining a reciprocal relationship between humans and the gods. The authors also give some example devotional activities to perform for certain gods and goddesses, namely Njord, Sigyn, the Ancestors, Land Wights and Tiw -- I felt that there could have been more example devotionals than just those mentioned but Krasskova had written several devotional activities in her other book 'Northern Traditions', so I guess it doesn't matter too much.

The most helpful part of the book was most certainly the Appendix which went into some detail regarding the symbols, offerings, colours and associations of a very wide range of gods and spirits. Certainly for a beginner this would be the best part of the book -- actually for this part alone the book is worth buying in my opinion.

The discussion of prayer beads was lovely and quite inspiring. And I enjoyed the section on god posts which I'd read about in a historical context but did not realise it was a practice that modern day practitioners had adopted. All in all I recommend this book, but bare in mind it's not about solitary heathenry but rather a solitary practice of devotionals. The nature of the book is interesting and is well needed as many books do not go into nearly as much detail as is presented here; it's just a shame the title of the book is suggesting something different!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars This should have been so much better, 16 May 2011
This review is from: Northern Tradition for the Solitary Practitioner: A Book of Prayer, Devotional Practice, and the Nine Worlds of Spirit: A Book of Prayer, Devotional Practice, and the Nine Worlds of the Spirit (Paperback)
Northern Tradition is a good book and well worth a read. However I felt the author spent too much time alternating between preaching her corner and looking over her shoulder to see what the rest of the Heathern community thought of her work.

Galina's writing style reflects that often used by Heathern authors and can come across as lecturing and brittle. I found it very hard to warm to her. The subject matter deviates sufficiently from the more mainstream Asatru works that she could have relaxed a little and produced something that brought the reader into her world.

I looked forward to reading this book, but by the end felt slightly jarred and annoyed. I have no problem with the content (although many Heathern readers do) but if she is going to explore the more radical aspects of the religion it would be nice to be able to walk alongside her as a friend, and to feel she had the courage to openly love her chosen path.

A fair read but not a friendly one.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not what it says on the cover, 14 Nov 2013
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This review is from: Northern Tradition for the Solitary Practitioner: A Book of Prayer, Devotional Practice, and the Nine Worlds of Spirit: A Book of Prayer, Devotional Practice, and the Nine Worlds of the Spirit (Paperback)
I was looking at this book as a solitary beginner practioner of Asatru however there is nothing in this guide that is remotely helpful either to a beginner or a solitary. I found the book hard to read - it is like a blog that has been downloaded into print with lots of people giving their views as to how they think or how they practice. There is some good ideas for personal Altars but there is very little information on Blots and how to perform them and the timings are related to daily worship rather than seasonal ones. There are sections in the book that refer to use of prayer beads. I'm sorry to say but as soon as I read a book where honour is spelt "honor" then you just know that book is of little use. The authors other book on Northern Tradition is much better.
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