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5.0 out of 5 stars A must read
An excellent factual review of the ET craft phenomena, a must read for any skeptic or for those who want to prove the skeptics just don't look at the facts, and base opinions on rubbish served up by the media to rubbish the subject which should be taken seriously.
Published 8 months ago by Mike

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Flying Saucers and Science
Stanton Friedman is a ledgend in UFO research, a good communicator and speaker
(I saw him years ago in Birmingham) but he's not got the most fantastic writing style.
Subsequently I found myself skimming parts of the book which seemed to get bogged down
in details at times and seemed to require prior knowledge of the some of the subject matter
. I felt...
Published on 3 Feb 2010 by Mr. J. H. Barclay


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Flying Saucers and Science, 3 Feb 2010
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This review is from: Flying Saucers And Science: A Scientist Investigates the Mysteries of UFO's (Paperback)
Stanton Friedman is a ledgend in UFO research, a good communicator and speaker
(I saw him years ago in Birmingham) but he's not got the most fantastic writing style.
Subsequently I found myself skimming parts of the book which seemed to get bogged down
in details at times and seemed to require prior knowledge of the some of the subject matter
. I felt I needed to re read Crash at Corona co authored by Friedman as I needed background info
- if you have not read that book then definately get it and read it before you buy this
one as Crash at Corona is a far more interesting readable book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A fresh approach to the subject with good science for the non-scientific reader, 10 Feb 2010
By 
The Guardian (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Flying Saucers And Science: A Scientist Investigates the Mysteries of UFO's (Paperback)
Originally from NJ USA but for many years now living in eastern Canada, Stan Friedman has been a tireless researcher and campaigner for the scientific legitimization of the UFO subject for 40 years. In his mid-70s when most people are content to retire he continues to work a busy lecturing circuit and is still a prolific writer on the subject. With this book he again proves he can come up with a fresh and original work with a sound science basis but explained in simple terms for the less scientifically educated reader.

The book assumes most readers will be familiar with the enormous quantity of evidence for anomalous things seen in the sky, and the huge library of (often severely retracted) documents Stan has obtained through his tireless research over the years variously from the CIA, NSA, DIA, US Navy and many other agencies attesting to the reality of the UFO phenomenon as of non-human origin and of great concern to 'National Security.' Real public attitudes to the idea of UFOs as of ET origin might surprise the reader unfamiliar with the material: from scientific public opinion polls and from straw-polls taken at hundreds of lectures over the years it appears certain that a majority of the population of the western world accepts the idea of UFOs as of ET origin, and that the more highly educated the person the more likely they are to accept the ET hypothesis. About 10% of the population of the western world admit to having a personal sighting - a huge number - and most people questioned have a family member or other close friend or trusted person who has had some kind of interaction with the phenomenon.

Friedman spends a chapter discussing the principles of near-light or faster-than-light propulsion systems of various types (nuclear fusion and the like) from his own professional work in the field and from the current opinion-leaders in the physical sciences. From a less talented writer this might have been overly technical and dull, but not from Stan: it's lively, informative and interesting even for a non-scientist.

One of the author's oft-used phrases for the international government cover-up is 'Cosmic Watergate', originated by Friedman and now used by other writers in the field. The reasons why this might be perpetuated are intelligently speculated about, and Stan, like this reviewer, considers possible concerns about public panic and social dislocation on revelation of an ET presence to be out-of-date and misplaced. If 'disclosure' were to happen, most people's attitude would be "well we all knew anyway; about time you came clean on this. Now what's for dinner?"

Friedman takes on so-called 'skeptics' very effectively and presents the blinkered thinking of SETI advocates as a kind of cult, restricted by cultic belief-systems about what ETs are supposed to do and not do whilst studiously ignoring the evidence that they are, in fact, already visiting us. He also, unusually for a writer on the subject, has a chapter on science fiction and the surprisingly narrow and non-scientific public attitudes professed by writers such as Asimov and Clarke.

Two connected areas of research where Stan has focussed a great deal of effort over the years are the 1947 Roswell (Corona) crash and recovery, and the MJ-12 documents. Each of these has been the subject of a whole book from the author in the past, and a chapter is devoted to an up-to-date synopsis of the evidence for each where again, the focus is on the hard evidence and of the battles with debunkers and detractors. The great thing about Stan is that he knows his stuff, and leaves no stone unturned.

FSAS does not regurgitate the same old case reports (unfortunately all too common in this field) but is genuinely fresh with a lot of new information. There is unfortunately a bit too much focus on arguing against the ignorance of debunkers; it's understandable why the author feels as strongly as he does about detractors over the decades, but it's less engaging for the reader to be talked through all the arguments again.

Friedman's prose is easy to read, and this book has an original perspective.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Of limited interest, 23 May 2010
By 
Ben Finn (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Flying Saucers And Science: A Scientist Investigates the Mysteries of UFO's (Paperback)
This book is mainly Friedman's lookback at his life as a UFO investigator (the author is now in his 70s). However I wouldn't recommend it for those new to the subject, and it could really have done with proper editing.

There's a lot of material about Friedman's investigations, media appearances etc. in the fairly distant past (e.g. 1960s and 1970s), which are of limited interest. Also there's too much said about Friedman's (again long-distant) work on various government-funded nuclear propulsion projects; the sole relevance being to demonstrate that (a) Friedman is a scientist, and (b) many UFO sceptics (including scientists) make ill-informed statements about e.g. whether interstellar travel is possible.

The book takes numerous other swipes at UFO sceptics, particularly those who have had conflicts with Friedman; and while it appears he has justification in his criticisms of them, it is written in an arrogant, personal tone which is distracting. As if, this is his last chance to settle a bunch of old scores, so he's going to make the most of it.

There is also rather a lot about the Majestic-12 documents (supposedly about a top secret US government committee dealing with crashed UFOs), which is hard for most readers to follow: much discussion of signatures, military ranks, date formats, typewriter fonts, paper, and other ins-and-outs of documentary evidence of the kind that might be raised by an expert in some abstruse court case. Though the content of the documents would be interesting if more were available, the arguments about their veracity are of little interest to non-specialists.

Aside from the above, the fact that this book should have been properly edited by someone becomes clear on pages 79-80, in which (with a strange sense of deja vu) the reader becomes aware that a substantial discussion of Friedman's analysis of Soviet nuclear space propulsion and the crash of the Cosmos 954 satellite had already appeared on pages 47-48. It seems Friedman forgot that he'd already made the same points earlier, albeit in slightly different wording. Though the book does list an editor, clearly no-one read it properly before it went to press.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A must read, 29 April 2014
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An excellent factual review of the ET craft phenomena, a must read for any skeptic or for those who want to prove the skeptics just don't look at the facts, and base opinions on rubbish served up by the media to rubbish the subject which should be taken seriously.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Competent, but Not for Beginners, 11 Sep 2013
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This review is from: Flying Saucers And Science: A Scientist Investigates the Mysteries of UFO's (Paperback)
Item reviewed: New Page edn, 2008

OVERVIEW. This book is an interesting one from one of the most serious and well-qualified of ufologists. It is a collection of 11 topics written over the years, which ideally should have been rewritten. Prior knowledge of science is not a necessity, but a knowledge of UFOs is.

DETAIL.

This book is a collection of topics written over the years, which ideally should have been rewritten instead of assembled. Sometimes this is very obvious, as in references to the Soviet Union, dissolved 17 years before the book's publication. Some of the topics give the flavour of a man long used to the insults and misrepresentations spread by the opposition. There are too many verbs that are in the first person singular.

He is (or was, as he is now in his 70s) a nuclear physicist. He may be regarded as a heavy hitter for the more respectable side of ufology. Friedman prefers the term "Flying Saucer" to "UFO", to avoid the ambiguity of the latter, although both terms have ambiguities.

Friedman unfortunately uses the term "believer" for someone who takes the reality of UFOs to be extraterrestrial. So Friedman, a physicist whose views on UFOs were arrived at from a serious scientific examination of the evidence, is a "believer", whereas someone like the magician-philosopher Paul Kurtz, whose views on UFOs are based on his deep faith in humanism, is a "non-believer". This is both misleading and an unnecessary propaganda gift to Friedman's enemies.

There are a couple of good forewords by Bruce Maccabee and astronaut Edgar Mitchell.

Chapter 1 is very good once he gets on to the various scientific studies of UFOs and asks why so few of them are well-known.

Chapter 2 is to say that aliens could come to Earth, unfortunately made long-winded because he insists on including material on his past career researching nuclear aircraft, etc. With my technological background I found this quite interesting, but others may see his career as simply irrelevant.

Chapter 3 is about where flying saucers might come from. Friedman introduces the Betty Hill/Marjorie Fish star-map centred on Zeta Reticuli. He does nothing to convince the reader that the map (obtained under hypnosis) is correct, or that Zeta Reticuli is the only possible interpretation of the map.

Chapter 4 is about how the military keeps secrets. Main good points: much U.S. government deception, most relevant info still kept above Secret level and not released, the media is generally unquestioning of what the government says, UFO data still held by many different agencies. Much of Bob Lazar's evidence on Area 51 is to be disbelieved.

Chapter 5 gives 16 reasons why SETI will not work, regardless of whether or not there are aliens out there. This is a chance for him to move onto the attack.

Chapter 6 answers a number of FAQ including the perennial Why Don't Aliens Land on the White House Lawn?

Chapter 7 concerns why 3 SciFi writers (Asimov, Bova, Clarke) have dissed the UFO subject and UFO witnesses.

Chapter 8 is about flying saucers and public opinion, which is much more pro-the reality of UFOs than is commonly supposed. Friedman makes the bull point that what deniers call a "conspiracy theory" is simply a case of classified materials being kept secret.

Chapter 9 is about Roswell, where Friedman was instrumental in demolishing the "weather balloon" explanation, still fondly believed by many deniers. I found myself lost in the detail.

Chapter 10 says persuasively that while the press may be sceptical of the government on political matters (e.g. Watergate), they ask too few questions over UFO "explanations".

Chapter 11 is about the Majestic-12 documents: Friedman says some are genuine and some are fakes. Again, a lot of detail.

There is a small index. The book is unsuitable for a beginner to the UFO scene. It is not essential to know any science before reading.

There was one thing that puzzled me, so I e-mailed the question to the author. He stated that the USAAF retrieved a crashed saucer in 1947, and could not immediately reverse-engineer it. That would be expected in such a circumstance. But surely there would have been a truly major effort at reverse engineering in the 1950s. Instead, the USAF spent hundreds of $millions on ultimately futile advanced research that had nothing to do with alien technology, as he knew very well because he worked on some of these programs. Did that not strike him as odd? He was kind enough to reply: the USAF research was not necessarily futile, such advanced technology as on the saucer would take a very long time to back-engineer, possibly samarium cobalt permanent magnets were developed as a result of examining the saucer wreckage, but in any case the exigencies of the Cold War required new weapons quickly. Let the reader decide.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Mr roswell, 16 Jun 2013
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This review is from: Flying Saucers And Science: A Scientist Investigates the Mysteries of UFO's (Paperback)
This book has been well put together (BY ONE OF THE GREATS) and as such is a very good read for a beginner to this subject or someone researching it. After all this man put Roswell back on the map.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Okay book, did not like the writing style, 7 May 2010
By 
S. P. Oatley (Isle of Wight, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Flying Saucers And Science: A Scientist Investigates the Mysteries of UFO's (Paperback)
I have read neumorous books on the UFO subject and had high expectations with this book but I found Stanton Friedman writing style very tiresome and irritating to the point I nearly gave up. The book seems to be a personal crusade against the debunkers and he came across as being very arrogant. I would not recommend this book to someone new to ufology but recommend they ready other books on subject before attempting this book.
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars flyng saucers and science by stanton friedman, 16 Sep 2008
By 
Paul Harker - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Flying Saucers And Science: A Scientist Investigates the Mysteries of UFO's (Paperback)
Stanton friedman puts the ufo debunkers in there place with this book these people have totally ignored the evidence for the past several decades and have mislead the public in the press and on tv.I liked the chapter on seti listening for radio signals when theres evidence right here on this earth.If i have got one criticism i found the chapter on MJ12 a little heavy going.This is not a book for people looking for a rundown on ufo sightings. I would recommend this book for people who have been interested in ufos for some time and are familiar with the evidence.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars UFOs, 23 Sep 2009
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This review is from: Flying Saucers And Science: A Scientist Investigates the Mysteries of UFO's (Paperback)
A good read but if you have a lot of books on this subject, I felt as though I was not as updated with things as origianlly thought.....quite in depth with this area of UFOLOGY though.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A worthwhile read, 10 Sep 2009
By 
Mr. Rafal Slotwinski (Staines, Middx United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Flying Saucers And Science: A Scientist Investigates the Mysteries of UFO's (Paperback)
If - like me - you are a True Believer, but are bored with "newspaper style" treatment of the UFO / EBE subject, then here is a dose of science from someone well-known and well-respected in the field. Certainly a worthwhile read which will give you a few arguments when discussing the subject with philistines and debunkers. Not for "first timers" or sensation seakers, though.
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