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53 of 61 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What Malcolm learned....
One man's opinion, Malcolm Gladwell is at his best when writing essays for magazines (notably The New Yorker) or when writing Outliers: The Story of Success, his most recently published book. (I do not share others' enthusiasm for his earlier books, The Tipping Point and Blink.) In it, he provides a rigorous and comprehensive examination of the breakthrough research...
Published on 13 Nov 2009 by Robert Morris

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70 of 72 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars What the Gladwell fan saw
I have followed Malcolm Gladwell for a long time, and look forward to reading his work. He is thoughtful, lateral, creative. He writes simply and conveys difficult concepts simply. Gladwell has become an important writer. And for me Outliers has been one of my most important reads of the last few years.

All the same, with What the dog saw, Malcolm could do...
Published on 28 Nov 2009 by Rbby


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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting collection, 26 July 2010
This is an interesting collection of articles/essays by Malcolm Gladwell. While obviously taking advantage of his popularity of his books over the last few years, this is still mainly new & refreshing material. An enjoyable read that you can dip into at any point. Good read.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars fascinating insights, 13 July 2010
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A great read, well written with a great span of topics. Chewy, insightful and entertaining. Who could ask from more from a book of essays?
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great collection of essays, 15 Feb 2010
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S. Gale "Stephen Gale" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I am a Malcolm Gladwell fan and I don't think this collection of short essays disappoints. I am not an avid reader of The New Yorker so all these essays are new to me. Malcolm Gladwell has such a relaxing writing style that it makes each of the essays very easy to read. Each of them has their own individual message.

I found the chapter on Taleb Nassim really interesting. I attempted to read "The Black Swan", but found the Taleb's style too difficult to overcome. Like other readers, I gave up part way through. This chapter, however, provided an insight into the mind of Taleb and the people around him. Much more readabale. Much more understandable. I thought the chapter on the Enron saga also provided some fascinating insights into what has been a much reported and written about set of events.

I read the book cover to cover and got something out of each of the chapters.

Since it is a collection of essays, where each of them stands up in their own right, unlike the author's other books, there is no argument that runs throughout the entire book. Each of the chapters has their own story to tell and I found it very insightful.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars a malcolm gladwell fan, 10 April 2010
I am a self confessed malcolm gladwell fan. unlike many of the reviewers i had never read these articles before and was genuinely intrigued by gladwell's irrepressible curiosity. He seems to find wonder in every aspect of human life, nothhing is boring for him and reading him sends us the reader on an extraordinary journey including such disparit subjects as the history of ketchup, hair dye and dog behaviour. its dizzying and exciting.
however, i must point out one rather irritating misrepresentation. probably the most contentious essay in the book is that on dogs. gladwell discusses the fallacious evidence that suggests that pitt bulls are dangerous dogs and should be controlled. whether or not i agree with that statement is not relevant, i dont, actually but that is beside the point. gladwell and i can argue till the cows come home that pitt bulls, bred to fight and kill at least their own species if not our own are not safe companions, however that is beside the point. in arguing his case he mentioned the issue of the first face transplant. this happened in france a number of years ago. the womam who lost her face had it mauled off by her pet labrador. gladwell used this as evidence to prove that evven a non vicious breed such as a labrodor can be dangerous. what he failed to add was that the woman had attempted suicide. the dog was desperately trying to wake her. eventually the dog was succcessful she woke, her suicide attempt though cost her her face. the dog then was not her vicious attacker as gladwell suggested but her saviour and it is irritating to have him state otherwise.
despite this i do recommend this book, gladwell writes with such and ease and enthusiasm that one cannot help but feel gladwells own thrill at discovering such a strange and fascinating world.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Open your eyes, 29 Mar 2010
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Mr. P. Holt "Phillip Holt" (I travel the world) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
In Malcolm Gladwell's forth book to date, What the Dog Saw, he has put together a number of essays, at taking a fresh look of why incidents or things happen. In NLP terms, to "chunk down", to look beyond what seems to be obvious.

Once again, Gladwell cites examples to back-up his writing, examples of why the birth-control bill, has a monthly cycle of taking the drug and a period of time when the drug is not taken. It makes sense when Gladwell explains that one of the inventors of the birth-control pill, John Rock was a practicing Roman Catholic, going to mass every morning, and the Vatican believes there should be no artificial methods of birth-control. Rock stated that the birth-control pill used the natural chemicals of the female body to trick it to believe it was already pregnant, and thus not release an egg, but still produce the menstrual cycle, thus the church should accept the pill.

Gladwell, explains how Rock's ideas were based upon trying to please the Roman Catholic Church, which prefers the rhythm method of abstinence, and had no bearing in the working of the birth-control pill which could be taken continuously. Research says that females are better off not having their monthly periods, being that the increase in the natural chemicals, estrogen and progestin in the females body at the time of mensuration, can cause cancer.

Gladwell explains why making the tops of medicine bottles more difficult to remove in the interests of child safety, makes them more dangerous due to the complacency of the parents.

He explores how we make instant decisions when meeting people, who is right for the job and who is not, and much more.

In Gladwell's 19 essays, he helps to look at things in a different way. A good read.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five stars if you don't read the New Yorker. Two if you do, 20 Mar 2010
By 
Chris Widgery (London) - See all my reviews
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What you need to know about this book is that it is a collection of Gladwell's writings from the New Yorker. So if you read the Ne Yorker, you will have read these already. If you don't, then this is five stars. It is just so so so interesting. He takes a series of issues/problems and writes about them for ten pages or so. Really, it's great. Every essay is fascinating. Loved it
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My Dad Loves The Book, 3 Mar 2010
I can't comment too much personally as I bought this book for my (90 year old) Dad as we had watched Malcolm Gladwell being interviewed on TV together and were both really impressed with his stance. So I ordered it on Amazon, it arrived promptly and he's enjoying it enormously, in small doses (due to his advanced age). I'll borrow it from him when he's finished reading it! Dad said it is exceptionally well written and as he has read much and widely in his lifetime, his opinion counts for a lot.
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What the Dog Saw: And Other Adventures
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