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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Intense, skillful, expression of war's toll on the psyche
The Signet Classic publication of John Dos Passos' brilliant anti-war novel provides us access to another significant account of the Great War and the writings of this 'lost generation' novelist. Although first released over seventy-six years ago, the novel's timeless message relating the effects of war and military life on the psyches of three young men is as relative...
Published on 18 Mar 1997

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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars good/old copy
item was as it said, book of three soldiers- john dos pasoos however book was really old- it had written inside messages of grafiti from 1950. never the less book was not damage but the photograph of the front cover was not as shown on product orignaly.
Published on 27 Oct 2010 by suzanna


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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Intense, skillful, expression of war's toll on the psyche, 18 Mar 1997
By A Customer
The Signet Classic publication of John Dos Passos' brilliant anti-war novel provides us access to another significant account of the Great War and the writings of this 'lost generation' novelist. Although first released over seventy-six years ago, the novel's timeless message relating the effects of war and military life on the psyches of three young men is as relative today as in 1921. Dos Passos' indictment of the war and America's role in it, contrasts starkly with the crusade like image of the War presented to the American people. The novel accurately reflects the diversity of a conscript army embodied in the three soldiers; a first generation Italian-American from San Francisco, an Indiana farm boy and an east coast Harvard man. Each enters the service with confidence in the role they would play in this clash between good and evil. The transformation of these young men carries through until the end of the war. Although, they all survive there is little left of their former selves. The brilliance of the language and the depth of feeling demonstrated by the author will captivate the reader. This novel rightly belongs alongside cumming's The Enormous Room, Remarque's All Quiet on the Western Front, and Hemingway's Farewell to Arms.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better than a textbook, 20 July 1999
By A Customer
I probably shouldn't have read this after the great and mighty USA trilogy since anything else he did only pales to that great work but this is a fine, if little known work from a great writer. As people who have read the USA trilogy know, Dos Passos absolutely hated WWI and everything it stood for and here he got to take out his anger on a few targets. While not as focused as 1919 was, he shows his feelings with a deft touch and a depth of feeling that was rarely seen in war novels, his characters aren't all brilliant, the only really three dimensional one is Andrews but they depict a cross section of American life and through their adventures he shows what his firm belief was: that the machine of the army sucked the spirit out of someone and turned them nearly into a automaton. And without focused on the gory battles, he shows the horror of the war in a way that few writers have. Definitely a book that needs to be looked at again and should be ranked with The Naked and the Dead, and Red Badge of Courage (among others).
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4.0 out of 5 stars The army game, 28 Feb 2013
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Officer Dibble (Zummerzet) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
John Dos Passos was only 26 when he wrote this astonishingly mature work. Based on his experiences as an ambulance driver in the Great War, this novel is anti-army first and anti-war second.

The three soldiers are a cross-section of the USA; socially, geographically and educationally. Despite the title, the book is heavily weighted towards the character John Andrews. The story focuses on his own battle against getting 'lost in the machine' and avoiding the fate of a 'coarse automaton'. Andrews is clearly the alter ego of Dos Passos and he despises the army routine, snobbery and ignorance.

By contrast the other two soldiers represent lesser pieces in the game. One is borderline psychotic whilst the other seeks survival and acceptance by 'staying in good'.

It is often vivid in its descriptions of army life in 1917-1919, yet this is most definitely not a 'trench' novel. Indeed one of the longest sections deals with the post-Armistice period. Even when the war is won, the shackles of army life bind tight.

This book was written in 1921 and the author's bitterness is still raw; a strength and weakness of the novel.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars good/old copy, 27 Oct 2010
This review is from: Three Soldiers (Paperback)
item was as it said, book of three soldiers- john dos pasoos however book was really old- it had written inside messages of grafiti from 1950. never the less book was not damage but the photograph of the front cover was not as shown on product orignaly.
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Three Soldiers
Three Soldiers by John Dos Passos (Paperback - 1 Nov 2005)
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