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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A well presented book
This is easy to read and full of ideas and I sight, even for people like me who are in that are of business. Very entertaining like his presentations on YouTube, which I also recommend
Published on 21 April 2012 by Kassandra

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Free ebook download
I purchased this for the price shown and was reasonable happy with
the content which I found to be quite entertaining

This book seems to be marked "free ebook download" on the cover
although I paid the full fee for the kindle edition?
Published on 7 Oct 2010 by Freehold


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A well presented book, 21 April 2012
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This review is from: No Tech Hacking: A Guide to Social Engineering, Dumpster Diving, and Shoulder Surfing (Paperback)
This is easy to read and full of ideas and I sight, even for people like me who are in that are of business. Very entertaining like his presentations on YouTube, which I also recommend
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An eye opener, 23 May 2009
By 
K. Bourouba (Edinburgh) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: No Tech Hacking: A Guide to Social Engineering, Dumpster Diving, and Shoulder Surfing (Paperback)
I think a lot of people could pass the book by just from looking at the title.

I bought this book around a year ago having suffered from having my personal email accounts etc hacked. I wish I had read this book before hand.

Anyone who has a presence on the Internet, from an email account to a blog should really try and read this book. We can buy security applications to protect ourselves from virii and mal-ware, we can buy security hardware to protect ourselves from Internet based attackers from getting into our systems - but what can we do to secure ourselves from people armed with coathangers and wet towels?

That last sentence isnt a joke, the book describes how a security system was breached with these items. It also discusses things that we dont really consider to be personal information and how to safe guard ourselves from ID scammers etc.

Its a very interesting book and I would recommend it to anyone from a normal person who has ever thought "is this secure?" to a security analyst. I also applaud the author for his very upfront manner and attitudes to this area in security
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good primer, 28 May 2010
This review is from: No Tech Hacking: A Guide to Social Engineering, Dumpster Diving, and Shoulder Surfing (Paperback)
For those people interested in seeing what it takes to be a physical penetration testers, then this, exceptionally easy to read and understand book, is the book for you. It is a simple, enthralling read which really does show you how simple it is to get into places where people don't want you to be.

The book takes you in simple steps through the sort of problems that you will encounter as a physical pen-tester: from getting in through the front door, to defeating door locks and other security systems, to bypassing security systems such as CCTV.
I am also heartened to see that the book does not simply concentrate on the "oh wow, gosh how cool is this" aspects of no-tech hacking, but also covers the ethical, moral and legal aspects of such operations; albeit from an US perspective - which to be fair to the author is his target audience. Those security experts working the UK might be better to look to Wil Allsopp's book "Unauthorised Access: Physical Penetration Testing for IT Security Teams".

I would advise any reader to take careful note of the author's musing on whether to disclose or not, when encountering security issues in the real world that are not part of your Rules of Engagement - they are very wise indeed.

The book is packed with little snippets and facts that will stop and make you pause for thought. For instance the section on how to defeat CCTV cameras really was an eye opener for me.

The book also contains sections on areas normally ignored by other physical security testing books such as Wil Allsopp's book "Unauthorised Access: Physical Penetration Testing for IT Security Teams" in that it has sections on: examining the security of public facing kiosks - such as ATM machines, information kiosks and the like; vehicle surveillance - although not one which involves you leaping into a cab and yelling "follow that car", but rather what your vehicle says about the you; and people watching, which has a stricking resonance with the workings of Sherlock Holmes, as after all, people are generally the weakest link in the security chain.

Whilst the standard of the book is high, there are two chapters: 6 and 7, which simply feel like they don't belong. Both chapters cover fairly higher tech attacks - in the case of Chapter 6, this is leveraging the power of Google, whilst Chapter 7 covers P2P attacks. Both chapters, whilst it is exceptionally interesting and informative, don't really strike me as really belonging in a book focusing on no-tech attacks. In fact the style of these chapters is sufficiently different that I have often wondered if the author wrote them for some earlier book and added them in to pad out this one.

Although the book sounds scary it is, for the final section contains some simple and cost effective suggestions on how to correct the flaws in your physical security. There is enough material in this section for an internal security team to be able to set up a cost effective and simple training programme based upon the lessons contained within the book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Free ebook download, 7 Oct 2010
I purchased this for the price shown and was reasonable happy with
the content which I found to be quite entertaining

This book seems to be marked "free ebook download" on the cover
although I paid the full fee for the kindle edition?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 4 Aug 2010
By 
T. Young (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: No Tech Hacking: A Guide to Social Engineering, Dumpster Diving, and Shoulder Surfing (Paperback)
This is a very basic book, and doesn't really cover much of what you'd believe from the title. At least half of the book is about very basic "Google hacking" - i.e. customising search terms to find things that are in the public domain that you aren't meant to see. The author even admits that "this is not no-tech hacking" - in other words, it's filler.

The small amount here devoted to social engineering is covered far better in Mitnick's "The Art of Deception".

If you're a 14-year-old interested in becoming an Elite Hacker, this might be a good place to start - but don't expect too much about, well, social engineering, dumpster diving, or shoulder surfing.
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