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on 26 October 2006
Deadwood by David Milch is more than a book about a TV series. Very much in the vein of the show's writing, Milch's profane, matter-of-fact prose delivers up his thoughts on everything from incipient society to the futility of marriage. He's even candid about his own drug taking. For the would-be author, it's also a writing master-class. Learn which events and characters have historical depth and which are Milch's glorious creation. Incidentally, studded throughout the book there are also in depth character profiles from the main actors, in their own words, exploring their character's contradictions and motivations. And around the characters there are also symbols. Milch is big on symbols - the most important being Gold - its ability to orchestrate the camp of Deadwood from a puddle of mud - into it's most monstrous abstraction made flesh; George Hearst. Revealed also; the symbolism of Al Swearegen's peaches - in their own way, just as important as oranges in The Godfather films. And once that symbol has been established, the folly in its unsolicited modification.

Finally, one cannot talk about Deadwood without mentioning its colorful language. Milch's take on the profanity of the series is that it exists as a common method of disavowing the passivity of language - that its absence questions the strengths of the characters. Which, ironically, makes the reader wonder about Milch's own profanity in the context of the book. If it's a veiled, macho posture: what does it conceal? We can but guess. For those, like myself, who despair at the loss of the series in its third season - and eagerly anticipate the concluding telefilms - this book is a great way to keep the show alive, it even includes an episode guide. I can't recommend it highly enough.
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on 19 February 2009
A truly beautiful book. The look and feel of the tome is perfect and mirrors that of the show. The photos (of which they are LOADS) are STUNNING. The historical references and newspaper clippings brings the whole thing to life, Milch's narrative is enlightening and the cast interviews are very interesting. Includes some choice quotes/script sections and an episode guide at the back. Never seen a better TV show or movie companion. Only criticisms are: 1) about 20 pages too short and 2) Milch's rather lame postscript on why there was to be no final series makes the blood boil. Is a really nice gift for any fan of the show.
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If you are a fan of the TV series 'Deadwood' then this fine book is an absolute must.There are brief synopsis of each episode from the three series,interviews,history and lots of photos.It's not just cast members that share their thoughts as people behind the scenes get a richly deserved look in as well.

The book is presented in a very professional manner and there is hardly anything that I can think of that has been left out.A truly excellent tie in to an excellent series.Highly recommended.
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VINE VOICEon 3 April 2015
I only discovered the TV series Deadwood a few weeks ago - me and my wife then devoured the three series on Amazon Prime in less than a week! The TV show is an uncompromising look at life in the real wild west. It is violent and full of bad language - but you soon see right past that - it is poetic, Shakespearean even and you soon begin to care about all of the characters. This companion book to the series is a great read and lets you delve in to the world created by the genius that is David Milch.
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on 26 June 2014
This is a beautifully constructed and produced book that is part guide to the series and part standalone interpretation of what Deadwood actually represents. The illustrations and images are high quality and the prose significant and interesting. If you found Deadwood engaging then you will appreciate this book.
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on 5 June 2014
A great book
Main focus as companion to show.
There is however facts from the real Deadwood.
The photos at times are very well defined for a book.
Buy it for a fan or yourself;brilliant!
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on 4 April 2009
Well what can you say!
This series is a master piece and the book is just great.
In watching the whole series you take on board that David Milch was finding his own way through the series and sometimes left you a little dimayed at the progress and introduction of so many characters. In watching, it was hard to put an "American TV" tag on it.
The quality of the book is brilliant and the interviews help a lot with the characters and how Milch works.
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on 15 May 2015
This is a super book for those who have seen the series
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on 17 August 2011
This book gives both an historical and contemporary look at the people and town of Deadwood, with some great writing from the creator of the show David Milch. Highly recommended by me.
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on 14 February 2010
I was hoping this book would be the story of "Deadwood" with background about the characters and detail of the "real" Deadwood.

It is more of a thesis about the 19th century morals and beliefs.

Very heavy going.
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