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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very Diverting Absurdist Fun
First Second is a wonderful imprint that's been publishing some of the most interesting graphic storytelling of the last several years in beautifully produced editions. This slender story, a translation of a book that appeared ten years ago in France, is no exception. At 64 pages, with generally six panels a page, it's a quick read, albeit a pretty strange one. Sort of...
Published on 12 Dec 2007 by A. Ross

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Dusty
The classic romantic setup of boy meets girl is given a twist where a professor's daughter falls for a mummy. The mummy is Imhotep IV who imagines his long-dead wife in the visage of the woman, not such a laughable storyline as you'd think given that it preceded the Stephen Sommers "Mummy" movies by a couple of years, and that film had the exact same premise...
Published on 8 Feb 2012 by Noel


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very Diverting Absurdist Fun, 12 Dec 2007
By 
A. Ross (Washington, DC) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Professor's Daughter (Paperback)
First Second is a wonderful imprint that's been publishing some of the most interesting graphic storytelling of the last several years in beautifully produced editions. This slender story, a translation of a book that appeared ten years ago in France, is no exception. At 64 pages, with generally six panels a page, it's a quick read, albeit a pretty strange one. Sort of Monty Python meets Preston Sturges meets Tales From the Crypt -- or something like that.

There's no way to summarize the story and do it justice, all you need to know is that it involves a romance (of sorts) between the beautiful daughter of an Egyptologist and the decidedly animated mummy of Imhotep IV. A day out together turns into a madcap farce involving drunken disorder, poisoning, element, multiple kidnappings, a pirate mummy, a court scene, a soggy Queen Victoria, surreal dream sequences, and various other outlandish elements.

It all moves along at a cracking pace with abrupt shifts in the story, so much so that I had to stop a few times and make sure I hadn't missed some transitional page along the way. For the most part, the translation manages to hit the right sassy, snappy, silly tone, with only a few misfires here and there. The artwork is really excellent and unusual, lovely pencilwork and watercolors with a great sense of palette. Guibert captures the Victorian era and brings it to life while also creating engaging characters with relatively simple features. The lettering is slightly disappointing, a lame faux-handprinted font called "Felt Tip" that is resized throughout depending on space. This a minor quibble though, and the book is perfect for the reader looking for an absurd and witty diversion.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Dusty, 8 Feb 2012
By 
Noel - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Professor's Daughter (Paperback)
The classic romantic setup of boy meets girl is given a twist where a professor's daughter falls for a mummy. The mummy is Imhotep IV who imagines his long-dead wife in the visage of the woman, not such a laughable storyline as you'd think given that it preceded the Stephen Sommers "Mummy" movies by a couple of years, and that film had the exact same premise.

The artwork is so-so, the story kind of tired as the silliness of a mummy doesn't really go anywhere. Imhotep's dad is quite funny and I did laugh once when he threw Queen Victoria in the Thames. But it's a brief comic book that doesn't really go anywhere or say anything much interesting. The story is a bit dull, the characters barely there, and while both Joann Sfar and Emmanuel Guibert would go on to write much better books, their first collaboration, "The Professor's Daughter", is a weak and forgettable book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Old fashioned love story... sort of, 14 Dec 2007
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Professor's Daughter (Paperback)
First, Joann Sfar tackled the subject of a dorky bloodsucker's "Vampire Loves," and now it's the love life of a lonely mummy.

Yeah, it's a weird story, and it gets progressively wackier, cleverer and more feverish as it goes on. But Sfar and Emmanuel Gilbert crafted a sweetly offbeat love story, between a young Victorian lady, and her father's three-thousand-year-old mummy, Imhotep IV.

When the professor is away, Lillian Browell and the mummy Imhotep IV like to tour London together. But one of their walks goes horribly wrong -- Imhotep gets dead drunk and trashes a cafe, and Lillian learns that he's about to be sent to the museum. When the cops arrive to arrest him, she accidentally poisons them. And when her father arrives, Imhotep sweeps her out of the house and elopes to Egypt.

Except they never get further than the docks: Lillian is kidnapped by a pirate mummy, and Imhotep is forced to hide in a kindly man's house. Their love is tested like never before when they are both jailed, and both their fathers -- the professor and the pirate mummy -- are determined to save them. Too bad they're no good at it.

"The Professor's Daughter" is kind of like watching a charming, quaint little screwball comedy. A very romantic one, I might add -- the romance between Lillian and Imhotep IV is one of those sweet, comfortable ones where you just want them to live happily ever after.

But in the meantime, Sfar keeps the quirky, poignant story rolling -- accidental poisoning, the arrest of hundreds of mummies, and Imhotep III proposing marriage to Queen Victoria (and subsequently chucking her in the river). Even the dialogue has that quirkiness: "The last time I meddled in his affairs was three thousand years ago, and he's STILL furious at me."

In fact, the second half of the story is basically a madcap caper through London, which ends in a most unexpected (and slightly gruesome) manner. Yet Sfar never loses touch with the poignant side of things, having Imhotep IV conversing with his long-dead children and mourning his lost wife (whom Lillian resembles).

That charm is only helped along by Emmanuel Gilbert's artwork, which is somewhere between contemporary graphic art and Victorian pen-and-ink drawings. Lots of firelight, stormy seas and stone jails, with lots of pale light and vaguely blurred lines around the edges.

The lovers are what keep this story moving, even when they're not in it, and it's hard not to feel a little tug when their relationship hits a speed bump. The actual professor is kind of a nonentity, compared to the gung-ho mummy Imhotep III, who is either insane or totally out of touch with human reality.

"The Professor's Daughter" is a sweet, slightly wacked-out follow-up to Sfar's tales of vampiric dating, with a slight twist on the usual boy meets girl story. Mummy meets girl?
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5.0 out of 5 stars Stunning artwork, 10 Jun 2012
This review is from: The Professor's Daughter (Paperback)
There story is fine, Victorian England, a daughter of an Egyptian Professor falls in love with a mummy. However, I purchased this graphic novel (comic-book) due to the stunning artwork of Emmanuel Guibert. This book stands out from so many other books which are crafted digitally (although done well is not the same) and other standard comic book styles. Painted in watercolours, many in muted and sepia colours it captures the era. The detailed obtain with watercolours and style are nothing but exquisite. I would recommend this book without any hesitation.
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