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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quirk Classics Does It Again
This prequel immediately opens with zombie action at a funeral. The late Mr. Ford reanimates; while Mrs. Ford believes he must have been alive all along, most of the congregation flees the church in absolute hysteria. Luckily, Mr. Bennett has prior experience dispatching zombies. This time, however, he decides to test his daughters' reactions to the "dreadful" (use of the...
Published on 3 April 2010 by Ursula K. Raphael

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Zombie/Austen Mashup Prequel
Journey back to Regency England - Land of the Undead

Dawn of the Dreadfuls by Steve Hockensmith is a prequel to the hugely successful zombie/Jane Austen mash-up novel Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. Set five years before the first novel, it follows the five Bennet sisters as they are trained in the deadly arts of the warrior, in order to combat the undead...
Published on 28 Feb 2011 by Pablo Cheesecake (The Eloquent...


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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quirk Classics Does It Again, 3 April 2010
By 
Ursula K. Raphael "AstraDaemon of The Zombiep... (USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Dawn of the Dreadfuls (Quirk Classics): Pride and Prejudice and Zombies (Paperback)
This prequel immediately opens with zombie action at a funeral. The late Mr. Ford reanimates; while Mrs. Ford believes he must have been alive all along, most of the congregation flees the church in absolute hysteria. Luckily, Mr. Bennett has prior experience dispatching zombies. This time, however, he decides to test his daughters' reactions to the "dreadful" (use of the Zed word is not appropriate behavior back then). He is disappointed when he realizes that the five sisters are not at all prepared for the inevitable outbreak.

Mr. Bennett contacts his Order, and Master Hawksworth shows up to train the Bennett sisters, as well as put Mr. Bennett through a refresher course. In addition to the training, Mr. Bennett tries to persuade Lord Lumpley to help him convince the military to send soldiers to pre-empt the outbreak. Believing that the zombie plague was behind them, for the previous five years, the deceased were allowed to keep their heads attached to their bodies, so the plan is to remove the problem before they crawl out of the graves.

When the soldiers do arrive, Dr. Keckilpenny is among them. He believes science holds the key to solving the problem with dreadfuls. His character reminded me of the doctor in Romero's Day of the Dead. For some reason, Elizabeth Bennett finds his unique way of reasoning very interesting, and there is some attraction between the two. However, there is also some attraction between herself and Master Hawksworth, which is beginning to derail the training of the Bennett sisters.

In addition to Elizabeth's mixed emotions, Jane is facing her own dilemna with the lecherous attention from Lord Lumpley. Of course, the Bennett sisters have their mother's "help." (If not for the rest of the family, Mrs. Bennett would have no chance of surviving much of anything.) The problem with this being a prequel to a parody of a well-known novel is that there are obvious spoilers concerning the futures of the five Bennett sisters, but the outcomes concerning the other characters are still somewhat unpredictable.

While the book maintains a mix of zombie gore and Jane Austen propriety, there are moments of humor that made me laugh so hard, I could barely breathe. I will never forget the image of Lord Lumpley and his slice of fruit, or Belgrave calmly offering to get another slice.

The writing style is more relaxed than Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, but Steve Hockensmith didn't have to contend with Jane Austen's style as Seth Grahame-Smith did. Also, the POV is not exclusive to Elizabeth Bennett in the prequel, as Mr. Bennett and Jane have their moments as well. I also liked the way chapters were not limited to the thoughts of just one character at a time, which made made the story flow quickly from one action scene to another.

If you like historical zombie fiction, I highly recommend Queen Victoria: Demon Hunter.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Zombie/Austen Mashup Prequel, 28 Feb 2011
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This review is from: Dawn of the Dreadfuls (Quirk Classics): Pride and Prejudice and Zombies (Paperback)
Journey back to Regency England - Land of the Undead

Dawn of the Dreadfuls by Steve Hockensmith is a prequel to the hugely successful zombie/Jane Austen mash-up novel Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. Set five years before the first novel, it follows the five Bennet sisters as they are trained in the deadly arts of the warrior, in order to combat the undead menace that plagues England.

The reader learns of Oscar Bennet's part in 'The Troubles' and how, as a younger man, he made a promise to raise all his children as warriors, irrespective of their gender. It is a definite plus point that the reader gets to learn more about the character of Mr Bennet. In Pride and Prejudice and Zombies he is very much a secondary character but in the prequel his story is brought to the fore. He is head of the family and still, just about, in control of his wayward daughters.

Once again Elizabeth is the main female protagonist but in this case she is only eighteen and much less sure of herself. Mr Darcy is not yet on the scene so she finds herself torn between the enigmatic Master Hawksworth, and a man of science, Dr Keckilpenny. Both men offer Elizabeth a glimpse of something different and what is missing from her staid country life. Hawksworth is Elizabeth's training master while Dr Keckilpenny is attempting to study the `strange plague' and its resulting offspring.

Dawn of the Dreadfuls is distinctly different in tone than its predecessor. There has been a change of author for the prequel and the attempts to emulate Austen's writing style feels somewhat lacking. This had been one of the highlights of the previous novel and I felt a little disappointed by this change. Austen's voice is not as loud as it was before.

On a more positive note, there is a definite ramping up in the action stakes. There are more zombie encounters than before. Each of the Bennet girls need to find it within themselves to embrace their training as they learn how to dispatch the undead. There are some very inventive methods used to dispatch the zombies and these became more and more outlandish as the novel progressed.

From a horror standpoint, I felt that this novel was actually an improvement over Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. The author has revisited some traditional zombie narrative staples and these work well. The novel's climax has a marvelously claustrophobic feeling as the Bennet family and their neighbors are trapped in the local manor house awaiting an incoming zombie attack.

Dawn of the Dreadfuls is a fun read and, if anything, it is more accessible than Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. There is valuable insight into the history of the Bennet family as well as the zombie hordes. Overall, I continue to be entertained by the juxtaposition of regency manners versus the ravaging undead.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic, build up for next one, 31 Mar 2011
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This review is from: Dawn of the Dreadfuls (Quirk Classics): Pride and Prejudice and Zombies (Paperback)
Just finished reading and now cannot wait for the 3rd to arrive, have pre-ordered so not long now to wait, this was as i thought a really good read, some nights two or three chapters as it keep you wanting to carry on reading, very good well worth it if your into your period dramas as the author refers to all the proper words and dress sense for the time it was written for.Great ending and i love the reference's to Mrs Bennet she is as batty in this as Pride & Prejudice, great fun
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Well Written Book with some Original Ideas, 17 Mar 2011
This review is from: Dawn of the Dreadfuls (Quirk Classics): Pride and Prejudice and Zombies (Paperback)
A very brave attempt to follow up on the success of Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, but Steve Hockensmith achieves this admirably and closes some obvious gaps in the original mash up.

The storyline is original with plenty of zombies chucked in and the Bennet family at the core of events. It follows the Bennet sisters training as warriors and their final `graduation' as protectors of their village when it is overrun by zombies. In the midst of the Zombie mayhem, Hockensmith manages to incorporate romance in the form of Master Hawksworth, a Darcy-type character who trains the sisters and Dr Keckilpenny, a man of science, both vying for the affections of the young Elizabeth Bennet.

The story flows well enough and covers the zombie defence in the 19th century and fights in good detail, unlike its predecessor. A well written book with original ideas. Highly recommended as a follow up to P & P & Z.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars not as good as Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, 9 July 2010
This review is from: Dawn of the Dreadfuls (Quirk Classics): Pride and Prejudice and Zombies (Paperback)
enjoyable read, but not as good as Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, i guess you can relate more in the first book with the characters, when you know the original.
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3.0 out of 5 stars the book came and the back page of the book was bent and looked like it had just been threw into the packaging so ..., 12 Oct 2014
This review is from: Dawn of the Dreadfuls (Quirk Classics): Pride and Prejudice and Zombies (Paperback)
Bought this as a present for my boyfriend as he has the other book, the book came and the back page of the book was bent and looked like it had just been threw into the packaging so i was quite disappointed and had to explain that it came like that. It was too close to the persons birthday to send it back and get a new one. But other than that the price was good and the story line is great, so along as you don't mind your book having a few bent pages then its a bargain! :-)
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5.0 out of 5 stars Superb!, 16 April 2014
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A excellent read, thoroughly enjoyed reading this exciting and darkly humorous novel. Found it hard to put down, I love the quirk classic series of books so far and will definitely be getting the next book in the series.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Very entertaining read, 9 Sep 2013
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I think this is my fav of the 3 PPZ stories. In the first PPZ it generally follows the normal pride and prejudice plot but with the added twist of zombies. The thing I like about this book and dreadfully ever after (part 3) is that this 'prequal' is unbridled from the constraints of the original plot and is all the better for it. I would consider reading this one first before PPZ as this is really the first book in terms of timeline. It deals with the training of the girls following the reemergence of the plague. Both this and dreadfully ever after would make great movies. Brilliant fun.
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4.0 out of 5 stars zombie gore with a side dish of humour, 2 Jun 2013
This review is from: Dawn of the Dreadfuls (Quirk Classics): Pride and Prejudice and Zombies (Paperback)
I read the Quirk Classics novel 'Pride and Prejudice and Zombies' early last year and absolutely loved it. I've been wanting to get my hands on the prequel 'Dawn of the Dreadfuls' since then, in the hopes that it would live up to the standards already set. It seriously did not disappoint.

For those of you who haven't read 'Pride and Prejudice and Zombies', just imagine Jane Austen's story set against the backdrop of a Britain ravaged by the walking dead. See in your mind an Elizabeth Bennett who is happier wielding a Katana than a sewing needle and you might just be there. It's a wonderful romp through a world of zombie-slaying English gentlemen and a band of sisters who can give any man a run for his money, including the infamous Mr Darcy.

'Dawn of the Dreadfuls' takes us back four years to a time of tranquillity at Longbourne. 'The Troubles' have been over for years, the deceased have been buried with their heads still attached to their shoulders. And Mr Bennett, zombie-slayer has allowed his wife to turn his dojo into a greenhouse. But things are about to change. When a funeral goes dramatically wrong and the corpse fights his way out of his coffin, it becomes apparent that 'The Troubles' are far from over. Zombies are once again roaming the English countryside. And it is down to Mr Bennett to teach his daughters the wisdom of zombie-slaying.

We watch Elizabeth Bennett grow from naive young woman to warrior extraordinaire, dealing with the rotting forms of people she once knew and cared for and fighting off the affections of two potential suitors, the Chinese-trained warrior teacher Master Hawksworth and the zombie-obsessed Dr Keckilpenny. Who will win Elizabeth's heart? And can the undead hordes be held back long enough for us to find out?

'Dawn of the Dreadfuls' is an imaginative and compelling look at the years preceding 'Pride and Prejudice and Zombies' and I would definitely recommend it to those who like their zombie gore with a side dish of humour.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Dawn of the Dreadfuls, 19 Mar 2013
This review is from: Dawn of the Dreadfuls (Quirk Classics): Pride and Prejudice and Zombies (Paperback)
I purchased this book from HMV not Amazon but will write a review anyway. I'm not a fan of Jane Austen or that style of writing but I'm interested in zombies a bit. I bought this for a laugh just to see what it was like. I've nearly finished it and I must say it has taken its time to get to the good bits. By reading it I understand the Austen novels and the way they are written. I do recommend you buy this book.

I read it one chapter at a time just to get a grasp of what was going on. I have 2 chapters left and I'm considering getting another book to read similar to this one. 7/10
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Dawn of the Dreadfuls (Quirk Classics): Pride and Prejudice and Zombies
Dawn of the Dreadfuls (Quirk Classics): Pride and Prejudice and Zombies by Steve Hockensmith (Paperback - 1 April 2010)
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