Customer Reviews


113 Reviews
5 star:
 (32)
4 star:
 (27)
3 star:
 (22)
2 star:
 (13)
1 star:
 (19)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Austen Parody/Tribute Ever
I don't think of myself as a hardcore Austen fan, nor a hardcore zombie fan, but this book pleased both sides of me.

This monster mashup is well aware of what it is and makes no effort to conceal its quirk and strangeness, which is exactly what makes it so good. It's straight-faced, ridiculous zombie action in a Regency suit, it's a jester with substance and...
Published on 16 Jun 2012 by ElvenAngel

versus
51 of 57 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A book with mischievious intent, that doesn't deliver consistently
If you look at all the reviews, you'll see that this monster mash-up of the beloved novel has totally split opinions of those who have read it. I'll tell you mine after a bit of explanation.

Zombies have been plaguing the English countryside for years. It's no longer safe to venture out alone; you need to be either armed to the teeth, or have safety in numbers...
Published on 25 Aug 2009 by Annabel Gaskell


‹ Previous | 1 212 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Austen Parody/Tribute Ever, 16 Jun 2012
This review is from: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: The Classic Regency Romance-now with Ultraviolent Zombie Mayhem! (Quirk Classics) (Paperback)
I don't think of myself as a hardcore Austen fan, nor a hardcore zombie fan, but this book pleased both sides of me.

This monster mashup is well aware of what it is and makes no effort to conceal its quirk and strangeness, which is exactly what makes it so good. It's straight-faced, ridiculous zombie action in a Regency suit, it's a jester with substance and wit and a funny hat. And it works. It largely keeps in tone with Austen's original dialogue and much of the original text, which makes it even funnier when you start reading lines about martial arts, shuffling undead, ninjas, disembowelment, vomit and some of the funniest innuendos I've seen in ages.

Look, this book is not high-brow literature. It's still quality work beyond doubt, but you'll be reading this for fun. And fun you shall have.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


51 of 57 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A book with mischievious intent, that doesn't deliver consistently, 25 Aug 2009
By 
Annabel Gaskell "gaskella2" (Nr Oxford, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: The Classic Regency Romance-now with Ultraviolent Zombie Mayhem! (Quirk Classics) (Paperback)
If you look at all the reviews, you'll see that this monster mash-up of the beloved novel has totally split opinions of those who have read it. I'll tell you mine after a bit of explanation.

Zombies have been plaguing the English countryside for years. It's no longer safe to venture out alone; you need to be either armed to the teeth, or have safety in numbers. The Bennets are well equipped to deal with the undead, for Mr Bennet and his daughters have been trained in the deadly arts in China and are warriors all with swords and feet alike, having their own dojo at home to keep their skills honed.

The Zombies and martial arts are all shoe-horned into Austen's novel, most of which is left in tact - it's usually pretty obvious which are the additions and adaptations, although not having read the original for many years, I kept it by me so I could compare and contrast if needed. I am also an expert in the BBC's wonderful P&P series from 1995, which enriched this reading immensely - imagining Colin Firth as Darcy swashing and buckling against zombies...
... Sorry, where was I? The novel starts off really well, it had me chortling loud enough to have to read the first few lines out to my other half:-

"It is a truth universally acknowledged that a zombie in possession of brains must be in want of more brains. Never was this truth more plain than during the recent attacks at Netherfield Park, in which a household of eighteen was slaughtered and consumed by a horde of the living dead.
"My dear Mr Bennet," said his lady to him one day, "have you heard that Netherfield Park is occupied again?"
Mr Bennet replied that he had not and went about his morning business of dagger sharpening and musket polishing - for attacks bt the unmentionables had grown alarmingly frequent in recent weeks."

Even from just this small quote you can see already that it mixes the new and old and rewrites other sentences to fit. Some of the adaptations are witty, and there is the added frisson of a little double-entendre introduced between Lizzie and Darcy. There's nothing like a little smut to remind you that this mash-up is intended to entertain - some of the other write-ups I've read seem to have expected a more serious shock-horror treatment, but the comedy approach was fine by me.

The only problem is, that with one notably sad exception, the zombies are a mere nuisance, seemingly there to prevent travel and explain the high turnover in servants - there are missed opportunities for more zombie mayhem in more elevated circles. It's mostly a class thing - the rich can afford warrior training and/or servants to do the zombie killing for them, unlike the working class who get devoured with relentless monotony. There is one real highlight though, appended at the end of the novel which, if you decide to read it, you too must save for the end - in which the author's comedic credentials are exploited to the full. A neat finish, but I can't tell you more.

So what did I make of it all? It was a great concept, (with a fantastic cover). It was fun, but not sustained all the way through. Did I enjoy it enough to read the next title from Quirk Books - Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters - well maybe! (6 .5 out of 10)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Austen vs. Zombies, 25 Feb 2011
By 
This review is from: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: The Classic Regency Romance-now with Ultraviolent Zombie Mayhem! (Quirk Classics) (Paperback)
Recently I wrote the following statement while reviewing a book - I have often suspected any novel can only be enhanced by the addition of rampaging hordes of undead. The publisher Quirk Books, originators of the mash-up novel, were obviously listening and sent me some books that would allow me to test that theory. Over the next few days I'll be posting reviews of a few of them.

The first novel I read is Pride and Prejudice and Zombies by Jane Austen & Seth Grahame-Smith. Before I begin, I have an admission to make, I have to be honest and admit that I have never read any of Jane Austen's work.

After discussing the book at length with my wife, who has read Austen, I am assured that the majority of the plot remains the same as the original text. The five Bennet sisters are all of marriageable age and their mother is keen to ensure that they all marry well into wealthy, well to-do families. The second eldest daughter, Elizabeth, is headstrong and independent. She refuses to bow to convention and very much knows her own mind. Enter a darkly brooding Mr Fitzwilliam Darcy. Initially he appears prideful and standoffish but as the novel develops Darcy and Elizabeth realise their feelings for one another. The additional plots strands regarding Elizabeth's other sisters and her friend Charlotte Lucas also remain largely intact.

Lots of stiff upper lips and starched collars are still in evidence here but tempering that with horror works well. In typically British fashion most characters consider the zombie menace little more than an inconvenience. This is where the Regency setting really works. It's clear that Grahame-Smith has made a supreme effort to blend his text with Austen's original. The best example of this is in the terms used to describe the undead. Zombie is considered a decidedly uncouth phrase when describing the unfortunate deceased so many different names are used. My personal favourite being `manky dreadful`.

The addition of action scenes don't feel forced. They are peppered throughout the novel at sensible points. The Bennet sisters have been trained in the deadly arts of the warrior, and are as comfortable dispatching Satan's servants as being demure and lady like. The darkly comic descriptions of ladies attacking zombies with katanas and flintlock pistols while in full evening dress will certainly stay with me.

My main concern, before reading the book, was always that I would get bogged down in flowery, difficult to read language and be ultimately bored by the experience. I'm glad to say that this was not the case. The witticisms and verbal sparring between the characters, seen by many as an Austen hallmark, are still present but I was able to follow these vocal gymnastics without much difficulty.

So does the inclusion of zombies enhance this particular novel? In my opinion the answer is a firm yes. The motivations of characters like Darcy and Elizabeth are only strengthened by having an additional, and in this case undead, burden to bear. I felt that the amendments made by Grahame-Smith have been handled in as a respectful manner as is possible.

I have heard talk of a movie version of this novel in the offing. I hope this happens as Pride and Prejudice and Zombies is a fun re-invention of an extremely popular story and would be great to see on the big screen.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Irreverent and dry, 20 May 2011
This review is from: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: The Classic Regency Romance-now with Ultraviolent Zombie Mayhem! (Quirk Classics) (Paperback)
AT LAST - the good people at Quirk books have made Jane Austen palatable... thank you, thank you, thank you!!!
Very dry humour, if you like irreverence and irony
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Very disappointing, 18 Feb 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: The Classic Regency Romance-now with Ultraviolent Zombie Mayhem! (Quirk Classics) (Paperback)
I love to read Jane Austin adaptations and thought this would be ok after reading the first few pages. However the parallels used are far fetched with no humour in them and the book is frankly turgid. It was so bad I abandoned it half way through.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Reveals the potential for mayhem that already exists in Austen, 21 Dec 2009
By 
Roman Clodia (London) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: The Classic Regency Romance-now with Ultraviolent Zombie Mayhem! (Quirk Classics) (Paperback)
Like Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters, this is Austen's original text with some excisions and a zombie plot-line inserted: so if you hate Austen's measured and leisurely style this might not be the book for you. I think this is a really clever idea which both subverts the genteel world that Austen creates and, yet, exploits the potential which already exists in the text.

Elizabeth's 'wildness' which Miss Bingley attributes to her after she struggles through the rain to see Jane is here turned into a ninja warrior's skill; and Charlotte's decision to settle for domestic un-bliss with Mr Collins becomes something both darker and funnier. Austen nearly always keeps the darker side of her historical world hidden (although it sometimes seeps through with the number of militia men around, and the battles at sea that enable Captain Wentworth in Persuasion to be promoted) and the zombie theme reinserts this sense of a society at war back into the main story, albeit in a humourous manner.

Plenty of reviewers have pronounced that Austen fans will hate this - well, I'm a fan and I love it. It's certainly possible to read this as a straightforward parody/burlesque/spoof, but actually it also reveals interesting things about genre and the way the Austen text is able to blend with something very different and yet still maintain its core values.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


23 of 28 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Be a good Fast Show sketch, but..., 25 Jun 2009
By 
Mr. B. S. Reynolds "Bruce" (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: The Classic Regency Romance-now with Ultraviolent Zombie Mayhem! (Quirk Classics) (Paperback)
Lets face it, as a full blown novel, this is a one-joke indulgence that's neither as clever nor well written as Seth and other seem to think it is. I don't demand much from books (lord knows I don't) but some kind of internal consistency is required even from jokes - the mere juxtaposition of one genre into another does not create synergy but merely drags the whole project down. Why hasn't the British Army destroyed all the unmnetionables in 55 years? If the aristocracy can send their children to years of oriental training, why not whole regiments? In fact the whole ninja aspect merely wrenches what minimal period charm could have remained in the concept. And as for the illustrations, what total rubbish!
Don't believe the hype!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Braaains, 1 Feb 2014
This review is from: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: The Classic Regency Romance-now with Ultraviolent Zombie Mayhem! (Quirk Classics) (Paperback)
Pride and Prejudice with added zombies seemed like an interesting idea. I went into this book open minded and I am sorry to say I was disappointed. I was expecting a little more than just Pride and Prejudice with a scattering of sentences changed to make them refer to zombies. I might be being overly critical but that's the way it read to me. I gave it two stars because it wasn't awful, it was amusing in places but it just didn't live up to expectations for me.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very funny, 7 Jan 2014
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: The Classic Regency Romance-now with Ultraviolent Zombie Mayhem! (Quirk Classics) (Paperback)
I bought this and the companion book - Dreadfully ever after - for my daughter but ended up reading and enjoying myself as well. I found it very amusing - not sure how funny you would find it if you hadn't read Jane Austen's original for comparison but I had a good chuckle as I went through it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic take on a classic!, 12 July 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: The Classic Regency Romance-now with Ultraviolent Zombie Mayhem! (Quirk Classics) (Paperback)
If you view the alterations and modifications of a "classic" as both wrong and tragic (as I have heard some people say!), then I would steer clear of this book altogether. Though the title should have perhaps alluded to this fact without my having to tell you.

Myself, however, loved this quirky interpretation. Seth Grahame-Smith made an excellent job of incorporating the prospect of a zombie threat into Austenesque times, and did so with flair. His biggest saving grace, as I'm sure most readers would agree, was to do very little in terms of character overhaul or writing style. With the exception of two or three characters, Smith did very little to change the actual outcome of most of the characters. And the improvisations he did make were most wholly welcome - in fact, dare I say, I preferred these certain circumstances better than the original novel (which I love!).

The fact that he didn't try to 'modernise' the dialogue or writing style was very clever and added authenticity to the story - if he'd tried to set the Bennets in some 21st century apartment complex, and provided them with some "chav-tastic" speeches then I would have downright refused to read it. Though a few veiled sexual references between Elizabeth and Darcy were downright hilarious, and not unwelcome.

I really did love this interpretation and would absolutely recommend it to anyone looking for a quirky, light-hearted version of a celebrated classic. You know, just in case your feeling too lazy for the original. Or would like a few more laughs!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 212 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Only search this product's reviews