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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A wealth of emotional, scientific and philosophical conflict
Third in Orson Scott Card's "Ender" cycle, "Xenocide" charts the events on the planet of Lusitania, home to all three sentient species in existence, two of which are not represented anywhere else in the universe. All living things on Lusitania are subject to a virus, the Descolada, which attacks and modifies the genetic information of the host and is evolving rapidly to...
Published on 23 Mar 2005 by Semioticghost

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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not on par with the first two...
First two books in Ender series are wonderful reads with a gripping storyline and excellent writing. Well, the third book has the same excellent writing but lacks the storyline.
No wonder Mr.Card is a great writer; whatever he writes he writes it good. Unfortunately Xenocide serves the purpose of bringing up a number of muddled ideas rather than telling a story. As a...
Published on 18 Oct 2001


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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A wealth of emotional, scientific and philosophical conflict, 23 Mar 2005
Third in Orson Scott Card's "Ender" cycle, "Xenocide" charts the events on the planet of Lusitania, home to all three sentient species in existence, two of which are not represented anywhere else in the universe. All living things on Lusitania are subject to a virus, the Descolada, which attacks and modifies the genetic information of the host and is evolving rapidly to the extend that combating it requires constant alteration of viricides in both non-native sentient species. Yet the native species, the Pequeninos, require the Descolada to survive, as it forms the means by which they transform into the different phases of their lifecycle. Any species looking to leave the planet would be required to take the Descolada with them, as it adapts and becomes a necessary part of any organism's genetic make-up. This is one of the main problems the planet is faced with, but the second is equally serious:
Lusitania is under threat of being annihilated by a fleet sent by Starways Congress, because the planet's scientists have broken the law of not interfering with alien species by helping the sentient Pequeninos to gain a foothold in agriculture. Rather than sending the scientists to trial and certain lifelong exile, the colony rebels and is thus to be turned into an example.
The narrative hinges on Ender Wiggin and those around him, with a wealth of emotional, scientific and philosophical conflict between unique characters against a background of questions more normally expected in moral philosophy.
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21 of 24 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not on par with the first two..., 18 Oct 2001
By A Customer
First two books in Ender series are wonderful reads with a gripping storyline and excellent writing. Well, the third book has the same excellent writing but lacks the storyline.
No wonder Mr.Card is a great writer; whatever he writes he writes it good. Unfortunately Xenocide serves the purpose of bringing up a number of muddled ideas rather than telling a story. As a matter of fact there are so many ideas (overcoming an intelligent virus, how to save Jane, the Godspoken, Novinha's frustration against Ender, Ender's "split" personality, piggies' rights, virus rights, Bugger's way of thinking, Inside and Outside, faster-than-light-travel and some more minor things) that all comes to frustrating complexity and since the author does not have enough "time" (number of pages) to devote to each idea, almost everything except a few becomes muddled.
At the end, since the author creates more problems than necessary for a book - that can be handled in a single book - in order to neatly tie all that mess up, he has to resort to deus ex machina by means of hard sci-fi. Well Mr. Card is a great writer of characters, but he's not that great in hard sc-fi; thus his attempt makes you feel kinda cheated.
Overall this is an inescapable book. If you've started Ender Saga you'll have to read this. Thanks to Card's writing, it is still a fun read but especially with its ending it is unsatisfactory.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Getting tired now, 3 July 2013
By 
Alexander McNabb (United Arab Emirates) - See all my reviews
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It reminded me of Frank Herbert's Dune series - stunning first book is head-spinningly brilliant, second book has maybe a little less verve and swagger but nevertheless delivers and then the third one starts to suffer from Lorenzian urges and just loses impetus under the increasingly suffocating swathes of irrelevance and invention for its own sake. It flies off to the left and right like a kid with Tourette's, barking here and howling there but never engaging or startling as Ender's Game did. By now I'm a little sick of Andrew Wiggins (and starting to think how sad it would be if the universe were indeed multiply saved by someone called Andrew Wiggins) and feeling he's something of a smug wee prig.

I liked the Chinese girl idea, but again the execution became wearysome. By the time we discover faster-than-light flight (by sitting in a cardboard box and rubbing the side of our noses) I've seen visions of Paul as a sandworm - a book I last read over 30 years ago - and remembered the frustration of a legendary saga that hit the ground running and then just started digging until it ran out of steam.

A shame, that...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining, intriguing, but just a little less than the previous two., 25 Nov 2013
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The book is the continuation of the Ender saga and continues in the style of "The speaker for the dead". The third book is just a little less of all the positives of the previous book for me. While still drawing you in, this instalment is just a little less intriguing and a bit too blunt and straight forward sometimes. Some revelations just pop up a bit too fast and arbitrarily perhaps.

It's more a feeling than a fact, but to me this book is just a notch down from the two previous books in pretty much every way. Still a good read though!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I found I didn't care..., 3 July 2013
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I read Ender's Game a long time ago and recently decided to read it again. It was as good as I remembered. I then moved on to Speaker for the Dead and enjoyed that novel as well. I had high hopes for Xenocide even though some of the reviews were distinctly "meh".

I have found that those reviews were spot on (I'm looking at YOU "A Customer"). I felt some significant social and theological issues were being explored, but near the end some elements were introduced that made me think - "actually, I don't care any more. This was unnecessary." 4 stars for what OSC attempted. 2 stars for leaving me unconcerned whether or not there was a 4th book. If there is, I'll never read it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Just not as good sadly, 11 May 2013
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Loved the first book and the second one i think preferred as it made me think about what if we did meet a fundamentally different species. Number 3 sadly just didn't hold my interest, felt more like a re-hash of 2 throwing in some oriental culture i couldnt make myself care about. I didn't read it all so maybe it gets better further into it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Xenocide, 10 Oct 2011
By 
J. M. Poulain - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
A very well written book by Orson scott Card, this shows the series continuing to tackle more complicated ethical ideas as opposed to the military fiction of Ender's Game. Ender has grown into a distinct character instead of playing the sterotypical child genius from the first book. Though occasionaly the normally hard science fiction elements can devolved into more metaphysical religion I thouroughly recommend the book.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Pushing the limits of believability, but still enjoyable., 12 May 2000
By A Customer
Ender's Game probably didn't need sequels, but I suppose these books are not a bad way to go about it. Xenocide focuses on the inhabitants of Luisitania after the pequininos have been integrated into society, and on the Jane, the comuter program who seems to be more than she appears. It also follows three members of a Chinese society on a remote world and their relationships with their Gods. Jane plays a crucial role in their lives and reveals some truths abou the Starways Congress that they may find difficult to accept. Xenocide is an enjoyable story, pushing the limits of believability, and seems at times to come up with too many answers too quickly, but if you enjoyed Speaker For The Dead then you will probably want to find out what happens. However, this book does not complete the story, rather it merely paves the way for more sequels.
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4.0 out of 5 stars It is still however a great book., 5 Feb 1999
By A Customer
This book follows on from Enders game and Speaker for the dead and continues the story, but unlike the other two books (which I read in the wrong order) it requires you to have read the earlier episodes to truly understand this one. Also the charactors seem slightly subservient to the plot. This book is filled with musings about the nature of life itself, but seems to be a scene setter for the next book in the series; a tying up of loose ends in preperation for the rest of the story to continue. Some new plot elements are introduced, but don't feel fully fleshed out. This is of course a purely personal opinion and I can't wait for the next installment.
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3.0 out of 5 stars A good book but with a few weak points., 5 Nov 2007
By 
plot hound (Dublin, Ireland) - See all my reviews
The emotional dramas are a little over the top, they are reasonably believable but not very interesting to read.

The plot carries on from the previous book with a few twists and turns but very little really added, the most interesting addition is the planet of genetically modified geniuses.

The pace is good and the characters are well developed with a lot of shades of grey but although there is a surprising twist near the end the rest of the ending is a little too easy and is almost anticlimactic.
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Xenocide (Ender Wiggin Saga)
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