Customer Reviews


13 Reviews
5 star:
 (11)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A good combination
A very good deal with 2 great classic stories. Bought for my daughter studying an abridged version at school and wanted to read the whole. The double edition provided a good opportunity to extend interest. Recommended value.
Published on 20 Nov 2009 by M. Lawrance

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars its ok
was ok, has two great science fiction stories, however the book did seem a bt flimsy and seemed easy to break if not used carefully.
Published 8 months ago by Bilal Bhatti


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A good combination, 20 Nov 2009
By 
M. Lawrance (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A very good deal with 2 great classic stories. Bought for my daughter studying an abridged version at school and wanted to read the whole. The double edition provided a good opportunity to extend interest. Recommended value.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Does it stand the test of time?, 20 Feb 2010
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I bought this for my son who had expressed an interest in reading it. My main concern was that 'modern' books are a lot faster, and pacier, than the books of the past and he might find it 'slow'. He didn't. He thought both stories were terrific, as did his young sister, so I would highly recommend it as a book which contains two gripping stories but also interests youngsters in the novelists of the past.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars I have always loved the film version of the time machine, 1 Mar 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I have always loved the film version of the time machine, and always wanted to read the book. Verey good. I loved it. The invisible man has had a number of films made of it, but I think the book is better. I really ought to read more H G Wells.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars its ok, 3 Nov 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
was ok, has two great science fiction stories, however the book did seem a bt flimsy and seemed easy to break if not used carefully.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars I saw the movie first. The book difference was a surprise, 1 July 2013
By 
bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
An unnamed time traveler sees the future of man (802,701 A.D.) and then the inevitable future of the world. He tells his tale in detail. Some of the details are fascinating as the traveler come to discover the secret of the results of social striation over centuries which eventually creates two separate species from humans. Which species is the more human? Can anything be done to prevent or correct this?

I grew up on the Rod Taylor /George Pal movie. When I started the book I expected it to be slightly different with a tad more complexity as with most book/movie relationships. I was surprised to find the reason for the breakup of species (Morlock and Eloi) was class Vs atomic (in later movie versions it was political). I could live with that but to find that some little pink thing replaced Yvette Mimieux was too munch.

After all the surprises we can look at the story as unique in its time, first published in 1895, yet the message is timeless. The writing and timing could not have been better. And the ending was certainly appropriate for the world that he describes. Possibly, if the story were written today the species division would be based on eugenics.

Anticipations: Of the Reaction of Mechanical and Scientific Progress upon Human life and Thought
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2.0 out of 5 stars The classics I could've skipped reading, 18 Jun 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I saw on a reading list of recommended classic those two stories as easy-read classics. Either whoever posted that comment has a completely idea of easy read from me or I have missed something. The time Machine is awfully written story that I regret reading (thankfully I already started forgetting most of it). I am still reading The Invisible Man and although it is a better story it is still not as good as the title implies. Overall I could have skipped reading those.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Great books!, 9 Feb 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I bought it used, but the book was in a very good condition. I had never read something from Wells before, but I have to say I loved him, The Time Machine was my favourite one. Don't believe people who tell you that science fiction is a useless kind of literature. It's just great, and I'm not even an expert in the field
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Scientists run amuck, 26 Aug 2011
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Time Machine and The Invisible Man, The (Barnes & Noble classics) (Paperback)
One of the very first science fiction authors -- and the one with the biggest impact on sci-fi -- was undoubtedly H.G. Wells. And this collection brings together two of his timeless novels, "The Time Machine" and "The Invisible Man," both of which center on brilliant scientists whose experiments take them past everything we know.

"The Time Machine" concerns the Time Traveller, an English scientist who has built a machine capable of taking a person through time. So he goes to the year 802,701 A.D. and finds that civilization has fallen -- the human race has become the grotesque, apish Morlocks and the innocent, vague Eloi. And as he continues traveling into the future, it becomes bleaker.

"The Invisible Man" involves... well, an invisible man. A stranger covered entirely in clothes, goggles and bandages arrives in the village of Iping, and frightens the locals with his strange behavior. When the "invisible man" stumbles across the house of Dr. Kemp, he reveals his true identity and just how he became invisible...

A future "dying earth," time machines, strange elixirs and the archetypical "mad scientist" -- H.G. Wells came up with a lot of the ideas that are now pretty common in science fiction. Some of his ideas have been disproven (the whole invisibility potion), but that doesn't make his books any less groundbreaking.

Wells wrote in a staid 19th-century style, full of vivid descriptions ("The red eastern sky, the northward blackness, the salt Dead Sea, the stony beach crawling with these foul, slow-stirring monsters") and powerful emotions (the wild chase scenes in "The Invisible Man"). He also had a knack for inserting some really alien stuff into the stories, as well as some truly bleak depictions of what might come to pass.

And he wove in plenty of undeniable science -- bacteria, albinism, evolution and the life cycle of a planet, as well as the question of whether there was life on other worlds. I can only imagine how these books must have expanded the imaginations of the Victorians who read them.

Two of HG Wells' most famous works are brought together in "The Time Machine/The Invisible Man" -- bleak, brilliant sci-fi that needs to be read to be believed.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Feudalism even within creatures!, 28 Mar 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I am a great fan of H.G.Wells' work and cannot fault this one at all. It follows the same genre of science fiction as his other works such as The Island of Dr Maurou - which I would also recommend for you to read. The Time Machine is a fiction depicting futuristic prophecy in terms of the use of ideas of the human race advancing in technology. It is ofcourse a dystopian science-fiction, almost bleak, gothic and apocolyptically depressing in some aspects, however, once the gritty stuff is over and done with the book flows more naturally - as you gain an understanding of the sub-text and after you understand Wells' own state of mind and his interest in the art of science. The novel deals with the idea of savages, the non-elitists and the feudal system, this is once again a reference to the period the novel was written in. A time of discovery and travel, and obviously anything/anyone different to the typical English race was regarded as a savage, this is a common theme in The Time Machine. I am not one to give away too much in a review, but this is definately one worth reading. Although, I wouldnt advise it as a bed time read, more like a book to read after you've watched the SCI-FI channel. It is a classic novel and one which the more current science fiction novels regard as setting the standards and conventions of the genre. Here we are talking about breaking away from romanticism, but high-lighting the issues in society in a fictional form and almost criticising the use of technological advances.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The revelation of a great writer, 29 Dec 2010
By 
Nikolaos Oikonomidis (Thessaloniki Greece) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Of course I was aware of the stories, having watched the relevant films, but up till now I had read only The island of Dr. Moreau, which I liked a lot. Now that the picture is more complete I can definitely say that Wells is one of the greatest writers and his novels are superbly written and full of charm and imagination. Not simply a great genre writer, but one of the best ever. Everyone should have a go at these ones, if he hasn't already.No wonder these stories became classic.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Time Machine and The Invisible Man, The (Barnes & Noble classics)
Time Machine and The Invisible Man, The (Barnes & Noble classics) by introduction and notes by Alfred Mac Adam H. G. Wells (Paperback - 17 Dec 2012)
7.13
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews