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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Moses and Akhenaten
Moses and Akhenaten - Review
MBPLee

The impression I get with the Old and New Testaments is that it is too cosmetic, too clinical, and too comprehensive and too immediate. The whole basis of the doctrines of Judaism (and Christianity) in the Bible essentially rests on the tablets and the message brought down from Mount Sinai by Moses. But did Judaism...
Published on 1 Dec. 2012 by M. B. P. Lee

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2 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A sceptic in the making
Not sure that his findings were altogether accurate and find it hard to comprehend that they could be one and the same, only that one may have influenced the other, but don't let me stop you reading the book for yourself.
Published on 16 April 2010 by Barbara Lunn


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Moses and Akhenaten, 1 Dec. 2012
By 
M. B. P. Lee - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Moses and Akhenaten: The Secret History of Egypt at the Time of the Exodus (Paperback)
Moses and Akhenaten - Review
MBPLee

The impression I get with the Old and New Testaments is that it is too cosmetic, too clinical, and too comprehensive and too immediate. The whole basis of the doctrines of Judaism (and Christianity) in the Bible essentially rests on the tablets and the message brought down from Mount Sinai by Moses. But did Judaism really appear suddenly in 1314 BC out of the genius of Moses and his seeing the "Burning Bushes" or did the religious beliefs of Moses and monotheism evolve from existing religions, gods, cultures, and traditions of the peoples in Egypt? And If it did evolve from Egyptian religious cultures, why has this fact been suppressed all this time?

Egyptian historical evidence has proven that the Pharaoh Akhenaten (1380 - 1334 BC) also known as Pharaoh Amenhotep IV abolished polytheism and replaced it with a single god Aten who was spiritual without image or form. Akhenaten ruled Egypt for seventeen years, but his vision of a mono-theist god upset the people and especially the fundamentalists polytheist priests to such an extent that he was forced to abdicate the throne and allowed his successor to allow the people to include the worship of the old gods of Egypt, Amun. The animosity of the polytheists and the followers of the monotheists were irreconcilable at that point in time. Akhenaten was forced to seek refuge in Sinai taking with him his Egyptian and Israelite supporters. And this was the beginnings of Judaism.

Sigmund Freud had suggested that Moses was in fact one of the Egyptian priests from the Aten Temples who started the religion of Judah. But as he was Egyptian, it was convenient if his identity was removed so as not to alienate the Jews since there was not much love between the Egyptians and the Jewish people.

But Egyptian scholar Ahmed Osman hypothesized that in fact Moses as depicted in the Old Testament was, in fact, a spiritual representation of Akhenaten. They were one and the same person although the accounting differed in the different texts.

The Egyptians, of course, divorced themselves from this blasphemy. The Jews wanted a new identity also divorced from any Egyptian connections. The Romans and Christians were determined to suppress any connections to the Egyptian polytheist culture as it would have undermined their own narratives, independence and authority.

The lives of Amenhotep IV, Akhenaten, Moses, the creation of Aten, the Temples of Aten, and monotheism all occurred about the same time in history. Was it simply coincidence, or is there some credibility in the hypothesis of Sigmund Freud and Ahmed Osman? Only further archaeological findings will prove of disprove such hypothesis but the evidence and timing is too coincidental to be chance.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 12 Oct. 2007
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This review is from: Moses and Akhenaten: The Secret History of Egypt at the Time of the Exodus (Paperback)
I am no historian but I found this book by Ahmed Osman very fascinating and enlightening. Introduced me to a subject I knew/cared little about but it's got me really interested and i'll be reading a lot more on it now.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good read, 11 Nov. 2013
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This review is from: Moses and Akhenaten: The Secret History of Egypt at the Time of the Exodus (Paperback)
I found the concept intriguing and extremely plausable that Moses could have been Akhenaten . There seems to be quite a comprehensive arguement in favour of this theory ,backed up by documentation and rationalisation
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5.0 out of 5 stars Ahhhhh! what a book. We cannot get enough ..., 2 April 2015
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D. Njoku (Toronto, Canada) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Moses and Akhenaten: The Secret History of Egypt at the Time of the Exodus (Paperback)
Ahhhhh! what a book. We cannot get enough of Ahmed Osman. A tireless researcher. A challenging historian and knowledgeable exponent of Egyptian history. A scholar. I invite the world to read his works. Anything you can lay your hands on by Osman will be greatly rewarding. I assure you.
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2 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A sceptic in the making, 16 April 2010
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This review is from: Moses and Akhenaten: The Secret History of Egypt at the Time of the Exodus (Paperback)
Not sure that his findings were altogether accurate and find it hard to comprehend that they could be one and the same, only that one may have influenced the other, but don't let me stop you reading the book for yourself.
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16 of 42 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not one and the same, 27 Nov. 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Moses and Akhenaten: The Secret History of Egypt at the Time of the Exodus (Paperback)
Akhenaten far from being the heretical monotheistic pharaoh portrayed by this book, founded the city of the Aten called Ahketaten whilst not supressing polytheism in the remainder of Egypt, as the evidence clearly shows. Something as simplistic as his throne name clearly shows this: "Neferkheprure Waenre" and his wife: "Nefernefruaten Mery Waenre" commonly known as Nefertiti. Note the Suffix "-Re" on both names of Ahkenaten dedicated to Re. Why would a heretical monotheist keep such blatant references to another Egyptian deity such as Re. For an account of the 18th dynasty based on evidence rather than drama, read Tutankhamen by Christine El Mahdy. A compelling read.
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