Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop Amazon Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Voyage Shop Now Shop now

Customer Reviews

10
4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
4
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
Darkest Hour (Age of Misrule)
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:£17.00+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 9 June 2005
The Brothers and Sisters of Dragons have succeeded in their task. The Tuatha De Danann, the Gods of ancient times, have returned to this world to fight the Fomorii, agents of darkness. But, as always with these higher beings, all is not as it seems. The Brothers and Sisters of Dragons have been manipulated from the beginning into doing the work of the Tuatha De Danann, and now they find themselves turned away whilst the Gods make plans to retake our world. With technology failing and Church devastated that the taint of the Fomorii led to the Gods' rejection of the Brothers and Sisters of Dragons, they decide that their only option is to take the battle to the Fomorii themselves - but even a victory may not be as well-won as they hoped, for the return of an old friend in a new guise and a devastating revelation for Ruth may mean the end for humanity's last hope . . .
With trilogies, it often happens that the middle book becomes something of a 'filler' - something to tie up loose ends from the first book, and prepare the twists and turns of the third. Not so with Mark Chadbourn.
Although, obviously, there are matters to be resolved and cliffhangers to be created, Darkest Hour is in no way a 'filler' book - it is a perfectly-constructed novel of its own. Moving on from the general feel of despair left at the end of the first novel, this book continues to build up the characterisation of characters which was so apparent in the first book, World's End, but to a greater degree, giving room not only for velopment but also evolution of characters as they find themselves changed by the events unfolding around them.
Chadbourn's portrayal of a world driven mad by the loss of modernity is also chillingly realistic, with villages trying to survive on their own and whole communities driven to fear and paranoia by the loss of all they knew. He also manages to inject lighter touches - the travelling bands who aren't affected by loss of electricity, or the many moments of humour, dark or otherwise, that are scattered through the book.
This is one of Chadbourn's greatest strengths, the ability to take us from emotion to emotion in a split second without taking away from the power of what he is writing. While reading a passage from the book you feel as though you are being led down a river, with a world of opportunity that lets you experience everything before gently nudging you to the next thing.
You keep writing, Mr Chadbourn, and we'll keep reading.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 9 December 2000
Picking up where 'World's End' left off this book follows the further exploits of the first book's heroes. With a summary of the story so far at the beginning, 'The Darkest Hour' is readable even if you've not read 'World's End'. As before, Church, Laura, Ruth & Shavi are battling to stop the world being overrun by creatures from Celtic legend. This time, though, the old Gods of the Celts have also arrived, having been brought back by the heroes in the previous book. The problem is that the Gods are not always nice either!
This is not the type of books classics are made of, but it stands head and shoulders above most of the urban fantasy books on the market at the moment. Fans of Charles de Lint will probably enjoy Mark Chadbourn, but be warned, this is much harsher than anything I've read of de Lint's. The characters are more flawed, more real and less arty than de Lint's. And I'm a de Lint fan. This trilogy is more like classic fantasy, but transferred to the here-now, not some ethereal distant world.
As in 'World's End', 'The Darkest Hour' ends on a cliffhanger. It's not brilliant as a book, but I've got to know what eventually happens, so I will be getting the last book when it's published. Therefore, Chadbourn's doing his job as a writer: keeping the reader entertained and wanting to stick with the story.
Try it. If you like le Guin, de Lint, Leiber or even just mythology and legend, you'll probably like this.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 24 August 2001
Reading Chadbourn's work must be what it was like for the hippies reading Tolkien in the sixties - absolutely mindblowing! He peels back the patina of our contemporary world to show the magic lurking just beneath. It's a breathtaking vision. This book is the perfect follow-up to the first in the trilogy - more mysteries, romance, action, chills...and the last page leaves you begging for the final volume. I can't wait!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 2 August 2001
I love these books. How many people in britain actually know of our own mythology? They teach you the classics in school but never touch our own rich legends.
I like this series because of the break down of our current technological world, the re-imergence of the old magic and who sez that science is everything. Just because you can't measure it doesn't mean it's not there!
The darkest hour is a good continuation of the first book and I can't wait for the finale. Will King Arthur appear? I hope so.
A good read for those with an open mind and open heart
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 28 February 2011
A multi-sided political struggle develops. Humans, the Tuatha De Danaan, and the Fomorii. These are all basically opposed to each other, but the Dragon sibling group seeks an alliance with sympathetic Tuatha to help them do something about the problems that beset them.

The problem they have is that some of the others are quite nihilistic, or don't really want to do anything. God psychology can be tricky.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 13 January 2013
My umpteenth read of this, the whole trilogy grabs me and sucks me in every time! Too too possible for comfort!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 31 August 2014
great books, I would recommend the set
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 30 July 2001
This second book in the series seems less tightly written than World's end, almost rambling in places, which undermines its impact. A number of episodes vividly illustrate the impact of "the return" upon individuals and communities, but do not serve to advance the heroes' quest. However, the author is able to excite sympathy even for these "walk-on" characters and much more so for the five heroes, who are put through hell. Folklore fans will recognise many familiar strands in these tales, that they're woven into a cohesive tale is no small feat.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 22 July 2015
Superb book
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 9 October 2001
Excellent-a must-read for any fantasy lover. Really original and full of intriguing ideas. Many questions raised for answering in the final part of the trilogy, Always Forever, and the continuation of the compelling storyline of the previous book-surreal and wonderful.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
World's End: Book One of the Age of Misrule
World's End: Book One of the Age of Misrule by Mark Chadbourn (Mass Market Paperback - 14 Sept. 2000)


The Devil in Green (Dark Age Book 1) (Dark Age (Pyr))
The Devil in Green (Dark Age Book 1) (Dark Age (Pyr)) by Mark Chadbourn (Paperback - 25 May 2010)
£10.85
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.