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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Unfettered Mind: Translated By William Scott Wilson.
The translater - William Scott Wilson - is an American scholar widely recognised as the foremost expert on Japanese samurai literature, the Bushido Code and the Edo Period of imperial Japan. His translations are reliable, retain original meaning and are easily accessible to the general reader. This book is about the application of Zen Buddhist meditation to the activity...
Published on 14 Nov. 2011 by ShiDaDao Ph.D

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3.0 out of 5 stars More for the historian than the seeker (and finder :).
OK, but more as a curious historical document than a text that inspires. In that sense I prefer some writings of D.T. Suzuki and Eugen Herrigel etc.
Published 2 months ago by M. Nicolas


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Unfettered Mind: Translated By William Scott Wilson., 14 Nov. 2011
The translater - William Scott Wilson - is an American scholar widely recognised as the foremost expert on Japanese samurai literature, the Bushido Code and the Edo Period of imperial Japan. His translations are reliable, retain original meaning and are easily accessible to the general reader. This book is about the application of Zen Buddhist meditation to the activity of the use of the Japanese sword. The writings contained within this book date to 16th and 17th century Japan, and are spiritually motivated on all the many levels of nuance. The original Japanese work was written by Rinzai Zen monk Takuan Soho (1573-1645).

The paperback (1987) edition contains 101 numbered pages and consists of a Foreword, an Introduction, a Notes section and a Bibliography. This book is comprised of three essays written by Takuan Soho:

Foreword.
Introduction.
The Mysterious Record of Immovable Wisdom - (Letter to master Yagyu Munenori).
The Clear Sound of Jewels - (Advice on knowing 'right' from 'selfishness').
Annals of the Sword Taia - (Letter to either Munenori or Ono Tadaaki).
Notes.
Bibliography.

Wilson provides the English translation for the Japanese text known as Nihon no Zen Goroku Zenshu, Vol 13, which gathered its information from the Takuan Osho Zenshu. These two letters and one instructional text offer advice about sword technique, mind development, self-transcendence, duty, psychology of combat and spiritual growth, the avoidance of selfishness, the cultivation of wisdom, correct dying for a warrior, and compassion. The sword is inbued with divine power within Japanese traditional culture. Takuan was a very well thought of Zen monk in Japan, who became an abbot of a temple in Kyoto at just 35 years old! This is astonishingly young for a Zen monk, and is indicative of the good reputation Takuan is thought to have had. It is known that he gave advice to the great master swordsman Miyamoto Musashi (1584-1645), and to the abdicated emperor Go-Mizunoo (1596-1680). Takuan, as a Zen monk, gave advice to all who needed it, includng the warrior class. He always brought their attention back to their mind-essence through his instruction. Although the 'hook' in these essays is martial endeavour, the objective is always a mind of no delusion. When such a mind is achieved, there is no need for violence, and martial arts become spiritualised as a result. A spiritual classic.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A different angle, 10 Jan. 2009
By 
M. Davidson (Southampton) - See all my reviews
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I have read allot of these types of books, I find them very hard going at times. What I get out of them is a view into a different world, sometimes they barely seem human but in-between they give a philosophical output that borders the superhuman.
I feel allot gets lost in translation and there is a vast cultural gap that is way out of time. If you put in the effort you will find lots to muse over and compare. The theory of "no mind" is the central aspect of this way of thinking that shows a very natural height that can be recognized and more actively sought after. Something about the writing makes the essence timeless.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Great Translation, 7 Oct. 2007
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M. A. Ramos (Florida USA) - See all my reviews
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This book contains a collection of three letters/essays from Takuan Soho to masters of the sword arts. They contain some incredible gems. This book should not just be read; but reflected upon.As another reviwer said, "The ideas of the interval between striking flint and steel to the production of the spark, or the visual and mental image of the glint of light on the blade of a sword become captivating and even revelatory." I could not have said it any better myself. This is a must read book.
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19 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Illuminating, an essential companion for all men of faith, 30 Aug. 2001
By A Customer
Takuan Soho's insight into the mechanics of the mind and its effects on performance, is much more than a manual for the martial artist. To sum up the first essay simply as saying "practice makes perfect" shows the ignorance Soho addresses in the first line of the first essay.
The three essays requires contemplation and an appreciation of its context. It is a useful companion to anyone who sees the usefulness of constant striving to improve one's Self, "We are that which we habitually do...", and a reminder to all faiths that humanity requires a moral code.
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13 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A magnificent collection from an old master, 24 Nov. 2002
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In this book, do not expect to find either enlightenment or the answer to your questions, because this is not a guide to life or spiritualism. Rather, the unfettered mind is a collection of letters, each revealing the viewpoint of the Zen master Takuan to the reciever. An amusing and deeply philosophical book, portraying a "path" long since abandoned. A must for anyone's bookshelf that contains spiritual books.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A very deep book, 13 Jan. 2013
By 
Anthony Alwell Herdman (Belfast, Ireland) - See all my reviews
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This books offers an insight into the unique mindset of the Japanese Samurai during an era when one was not simply expected to master the sword but to also master his own self.
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3.0 out of 5 stars More for the historian than the seeker (and finder :)., 26 Mar. 2015
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M. Nicolas (Portugal) - See all my reviews
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OK, but more as a curious historical document than a text that inspires. In that sense I prefer some writings of D.T. Suzuki and Eugen Herrigel etc.
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10 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A PATH TO ENLIGHTENMENT, 11 July 1998
By A Customer
I have been involved with the martial arts for over 25 years. Student, instructor, swordsman. I consider this book a reference tool and a source of inspiritation. My copy is worn and tattered, what more can I say.
I am sure that Musashi valued his friendship with the author. The insights into human nature and self improvement are timeless.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 10 Feb. 2015
This book it`s amazing. It is a must have.
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9 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, but not illuminating., 6 April 1998
By A Customer
Takuan Soho has a book made of 3 parts, the first is a letter he wrote to a sword master about not "stopping the mind" and "the right mind" which basically amounts to "practice makes perfect" to the modern marital artist. I can't say that it went any further than that.

The next section reminded me very strongly of Plato's republic, as Takuan Soho went into the nature of the world as it is, which is very much seen through the lense of his understanding (16th century Japanese science I guess) which is sometimes ridiculous, and of limited use.

The third section is interesting, as he takes writing of various martial artists and interprets them or critiques them. This is useful for a modern martial artist, as we lack much of the historical and cultural context to interpret these directly from the translation. This section, along with the first are what makes the book worth reading. Still, I think that there are many more useful books out there for the martial artist to read before this one. Try Frederick Lovret's "Way and the Power", or Sun Tzu's "The Art of War" or Musashi's "A Book of Five Rings". All of these are much more useful.
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The Unfettered Mind: Writings from a Zen Master to a Master Swordsman
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